The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: vintage
May 15, 1977: An article in The Times Magazine presented President Jimmy Carter, early in his single term, as a “Maestro of the Media,” explaining his success on the screen. “These are the glory days,” reported Richard Reeves, “and the man can seem to do no electronic wrong.” To the left of the president’s ear, Barry Jagoda gave some last-minute advice. Photo: Theresa Zabala/The New York Times
May 15, 1977: An article in The Times Magazine presented President Jimmy Carter, early in his single term, as a “Maestro of the Media,” explaining his success on the screen. “These are the glory days,” reported Richard Reeves, “and the man can seem to do no electronic wrong.” To the left of the president’s ear, Barry Jagoda gave some last-minute advice. Photo: Theresa Zabala/The New York Times

May 15, 1977: An article in The Times Magazine presented President Jimmy Carter, early in his single term, as a “Maestro of the Media,” explaining his success on the screen. “These are the glory days,” reported Richard Reeves, “and the man can seem to do no electronic wrong.” To the left of the president’s ear, Barry Jagoda gave some last-minute advice. Photo: Theresa Zabala/The New York Times

Oct. 4, 1949: How better to sell the government’s debt than with multitudes of the smiling visage of President Harry S. Truman? Such was the thinking in 1949, when a group of “the country’s top cartoonists and comic-strip artists” was assembled to accompany a traveling exhibit of their work to help sell government bonds. Before the tour began, reported The Times, they gathered in the Rose Garden to meet with the president, face to faces. Photo: Bruce Hoertel/The New York Times
Oct. 4, 1949: How better to sell the government’s debt than with multitudes of the smiling visage of President Harry S. Truman? Such was the thinking in 1949, when a group of “the country’s top cartoonists and comic-strip artists” was assembled to accompany a traveling exhibit of their work to help sell government bonds. Before the tour began, reported The Times, they gathered in the Rose Garden to meet with the president, face to faces. Photo: Bruce Hoertel/The New York Times

Oct. 4, 1949: How better to sell the government’s debt than with multitudes of the smiling visage of President Harry S. Truman? Such was the thinking in 1949, when a group of “the country’s top cartoonists and comic-strip artists” was assembled to accompany a traveling exhibit of their work to help sell government bonds. Before the tour began, reported The Times, they gathered in the Rose Garden to meet with the president, face to faces. Photo: Bruce Hoertel/The New York Times

While the Cuban missile crisis threatened nuclear Armageddon, Stephen I. Horn, of the Jonas Brothers Studios taxidermy, was lamenting that most folks don’t realize what it takes to make a decorative fur rug. “They think taxidermy is just stuffing animals,” he was quoted as saying in the paper of Oct. 25, 1962. “It’s much more than that.” The article elaborates, showing how to make a head: “A papier-mâché form is molded. This is covered with soft putty. Glass eyes are set into the wet putty and the skin is carefully fitted over it. The head takes two or three days to dry completely.” Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times
While the Cuban missile crisis threatened nuclear Armageddon, Stephen I. Horn, of the Jonas Brothers Studios taxidermy, was lamenting that most folks don’t realize what it takes to make a decorative fur rug. “They think taxidermy is just stuffing animals,” he was quoted as saying in the paper of Oct. 25, 1962. “It’s much more than that.” The article elaborates, showing how to make a head: “A papier-mâché form is molded. This is covered with soft putty. Glass eyes are set into the wet putty and the skin is carefully fitted over it. The head takes two or three days to dry completely.” Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times

While the Cuban missile crisis threatened nuclear Armageddon, Stephen I. Horn, of the Jonas Brothers Studios taxidermy, was lamenting that most folks don’t realize what it takes to make a decorative fur rug. “They think taxidermy is just stuffing animals,” he was quoted as saying in the paper of Oct. 25, 1962. “It’s much more than that.” The article elaborates, showing how to make a head: “A papier-mâché form is molded. This is covered with soft putty. Glass eyes are set into the wet putty and the skin is carefully fitted over it. The head takes two or three days to dry completely.” Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times

In an undated photo, Ernesto Peruggi, a “prominent designer of dolls,” sculpted from young Mildred Marcia Pinkenfeld, who, at 16 weeks, was known as “America’s perfect baby.” According to a brief death notice, Mr. Peruggi, of Fair Lawn, N.J., died in 1957 at the age of 73. (Questions about what distinguishes a regular baby from a “perfect baby” might find answers — although probably far more questions — in this 1913 Pittsburgh Press clipping.) Photo: The New York Times
In an undated photo, Ernesto Peruggi, a “prominent designer of dolls,” sculpted from young Mildred Marcia Pinkenfeld, who, at 16 weeks, was known as “America’s perfect baby.” According to a brief death notice, Mr. Peruggi, of Fair Lawn, N.J., died in 1957 at the age of 73. (Questions about what distinguishes a regular baby from a “perfect baby” might find answers — although probably far more questions — in this 1913 Pittsburgh Press clipping.) Photo: The New York Times

In an undated photo, Ernesto Peruggi, a “prominent designer of dolls,” sculpted from young Mildred Marcia Pinkenfeld, who, at 16 weeks, was known as “America’s perfect baby.” According to a brief death notice, Mr. Peruggi, of Fair Lawn, N.J., died in 1957 at the age of 73. (Questions about what distinguishes a regular baby from a “perfect baby” might find answers — although probably far more questions — in this 1913 Pittsburgh Press clipping.) Photo: The New York Times

March 8, 1919: The statue of Bartolomeo Colleoni, a 15th-century Venetian military person of rank, was removed from Venice to prevent vandalism of it during Austria-Hungary’s advance on the Italian front during World War I. The statue was saved from the Austrians’ foul scribblings, but not, alas, from the pigeons of the Santi Giovanni e Paolo church, who rest on Colleoni’s bronze steed to this day. Photo: The New York Times
March 8, 1919: The statue of Bartolomeo Colleoni, a 15th-century Venetian military person of rank, was removed from Venice to prevent vandalism of it during Austria-Hungary’s advance on the Italian front during World War I. The statue was saved from the Austrians’ foul scribblings, but not, alas, from the pigeons of the Santi Giovanni e Paolo church, who rest on Colleoni’s bronze steed to this day. Photo: The New York Times

March 8, 1919: The statue of Bartolomeo Colleoni, a 15th-century Venetian military person of rank, was removed from Venice to prevent vandalism of it during Austria-Hungary’s advance on the Italian front during World War I. The statue was saved from the Austrians’ foul scribblings, but not, alas, from the pigeons of the Santi Giovanni e Paolo church, who rest on Colleoni’s bronze steed to this day. Photo: The New York Times

April 7, 1946: “Despite Cain’s stare, Queen Victoria hasn’t a hangover. The ‘icebag’ protects her elaborately carved crown,” The Times reported in the magazine. “Wonderful as are the works in the display galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art — one of the five or six great treasure houses of this world — a large part of the museum’s wonders is hidden from view in some forty storerooms, most of them underground,” wrote Charles Grutzner. Other pictures of some of the museum’s treasures sport innuendo-rife captions: “Bronze nudes and a marble Antigone share museum’s nether regions with a giant boar and undraped Venuses.” Photo: The New York Times
April 7, 1946: “Despite Cain’s stare, Queen Victoria hasn’t a hangover. The ‘icebag’ protects her elaborately carved crown,” The Times reported in the magazine. “Wonderful as are the works in the display galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art — one of the five or six great treasure houses of this world — a large part of the museum’s wonders is hidden from view in some forty storerooms, most of them underground,” wrote Charles Grutzner. Other pictures of some of the museum’s treasures sport innuendo-rife captions: “Bronze nudes and a marble Antigone share museum’s nether regions with a giant boar and undraped Venuses.” Photo: The New York Times

April 7, 1946: “Despite Cain’s stare, Queen Victoria hasn’t a hangover. The ‘icebag’ protects her elaborately carved crown,” The Times reported in the magazine. “Wonderful as are the works in the display galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art — one of the five or six great treasure houses of this world — a large part of the museum’s wonders is hidden from view in some forty storerooms, most of them underground,” wrote Charles Grutzner. Other pictures of some of the museum’s treasures sport innuendo-rife captions: “Bronze nudes and a marble Antigone share museum’s nether regions with a giant boar and undraped Venuses.” Photo: The New York Times

June 3, 1953: “In the tramp of ten thousand marching feet the oldest among the spectators heard an echo of the might and majesty of the greatest empire that the world has ever known,” a breathless reporter for The New York Times wrote on the occasion of Queen Elizabeth II’s crowning. “Only the British, among all the peoples of the earth, could have staged such a display and every moment of it seemed to be savored by an appreciative public drawn from the four quarters of the globe and from virtually every nation and people under the sun.” A far cry from these days, when it seems the only thing keeping the monarchy from receding into obscurity is a single tiny baby. Photo: The New York Times
June 3, 1953: “In the tramp of ten thousand marching feet the oldest among the spectators heard an echo of the might and majesty of the greatest empire that the world has ever known,” a breathless reporter for The New York Times wrote on the occasion of Queen Elizabeth II’s crowning. “Only the British, among all the peoples of the earth, could have staged such a display and every moment of it seemed to be savored by an appreciative public drawn from the four quarters of the globe and from virtually every nation and people under the sun.” A far cry from these days, when it seems the only thing keeping the monarchy from receding into obscurity is a single tiny baby. Photo: The New York Times

June 3, 1953: “In the tramp of ten thousand marching feet the oldest among the spectators heard an echo of the might and majesty of the greatest empire that the world has ever known,” a breathless reporter for The New York Times wrote on the occasion of Queen Elizabeth II’s crowning. “Only the British, among all the peoples of the earth, could have staged such a display and every moment of it seemed to be savored by an appreciative public drawn from the four quarters of the globe and from virtually every nation and people under the sun.” A far cry from these days, when it seems the only thing keeping the monarchy from receding into obscurity is a single tiny baby. Photo: The New York Times

Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and waiting. “I’ll probably get fired,” a secretary was quoted complaining. “But I’ve waited this long so I’m going to wait till she comes down — even if I don’t make it back to the office before closing time.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times
Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and waiting. “I’ll probably get fired,” a secretary was quoted complaining. “But I’ve waited this long so I’m going to wait till she comes down — even if I don’t make it back to the office before closing time.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and waiting. “I’ll probably get fired,” a secretary was quoted complaining. “But I’ve waited this long so I’m going to wait till she comes down — even if I don’t make it back to the office before closing time.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times