The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: vintage
May 10, 1972: Annie Catullo, puffing on a cigarette, inspected a fish’s freshness at a market where she intended to buy fish from a wholesaler for her upper Park Avenue store. The picture was evidently intended to accompany an article published in the paper of Aug. 13, 1974, that gave ample information about the frozen fish market and its bursting bubbles. “There has been a suggestion,” The Times reported with a soupçon of intrigue, “that the Canadian Government will buy and hold some of the Canadian wholesalers’ oversupply until prices rise again and then sell it back to the packers at the price it was bought.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times
May 10, 1972: Annie Catullo, puffing on a cigarette, inspected a fish’s freshness at a market where she intended to buy fish from a wholesaler for her upper Park Avenue store. The picture was evidently intended to accompany an article published in the paper of Aug. 13, 1974, that gave ample information about the frozen fish market and its bursting bubbles. “There has been a suggestion,” The Times reported with a soupçon of intrigue, “that the Canadian Government will buy and hold some of the Canadian wholesalers’ oversupply until prices rise again and then sell it back to the packers at the price it was bought.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

May 10, 1972: Annie Catullo, puffing on a cigarette, inspected a fish’s freshness at a market where she intended to buy fish from a wholesaler for her upper Park Avenue store. The picture was evidently intended to accompany an article published in the paper of Aug. 13, 1974, that gave ample information about the frozen fish market and its bursting bubbles. “There has been a suggestion,” The Times reported with a soupçon of intrigue, “that the Canadian Government will buy and hold some of the Canadian wholesalers’ oversupply until prices rise again and then sell it back to the packers at the price it was bought.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

Douglas MacLean, with a record catch of barracuda. Mr. MacLean was a star of silent films like “Seven Keys to Baldpate,” or “Soft Cushions,” the latter of which co-starred a cricket that was “captured in California and trained to tricks.” It was also reported that the “cricket donned a make-up for the part,” and was “expected to race a brother cricket in a novel game invented by MacLean. In order to distinguish the two crickets one wears a dab of grease paint.” Though this picture is undated, one is tempted to guess it was taken before his second divorce, in 1948, from Barbara Barondes, a former Broadway actress. That news appeared alongside an unrelated notice headed “Bees Get Dander Up,” which described a scene like something from a slapstick farce: “Angry bees on the farm of G.P. Steyn, of Orange River, South Africa, drove his pigs into a duck pond, chased his cows through the krall gate and killed many chickens.” Photo: The New York Times
Douglas MacLean, with a record catch of barracuda. Mr. MacLean was a star of silent films like “Seven Keys to Baldpate,” or “Soft Cushions,” the latter of which co-starred a cricket that was “captured in California and trained to tricks.” It was also reported that the “cricket donned a make-up for the part,” and was “expected to race a brother cricket in a novel game invented by MacLean. In order to distinguish the two crickets one wears a dab of grease paint.” Though this picture is undated, one is tempted to guess it was taken before his second divorce, in 1948, from Barbara Barondes, a former Broadway actress. That news appeared alongside an unrelated notice headed “Bees Get Dander Up,” which described a scene like something from a slapstick farce: “Angry bees on the farm of G.P. Steyn, of Orange River, South Africa, drove his pigs into a duck pond, chased his cows through the krall gate and killed many chickens.” Photo: The New York Times

Douglas MacLean, with a record catch of barracuda. Mr. MacLean was a star of silent films like “Seven Keys to Baldpate,” or “Soft Cushions,” the latter of which co-starred a cricket that was “captured in California and trained to tricks.” It was also reported that the “cricket donned a make-up for the part,” and was “expected to race a brother cricket in a novel game invented by MacLean. In order to distinguish the two crickets one wears a dab of grease paint.” Though this picture is undated, one is tempted to guess it was taken before his second divorce, in 1948, from Barbara Barondes, a former Broadway actress. That news appeared alongside an unrelated notice headed “Bees Get Dander Up,” which described a scene like something from a slapstick farce: “Angry bees on the farm of G.P. Steyn, of Orange River, South Africa, drove his pigs into a duck pond, chased his cows through the krall gate and killed many chickens.” Photo: The New York Times

May 24, 1960: Sam Falk of The New York Times sought the perfect shot of an aquarium shark in a year when a Jersey Shore shark attack frightened the Metro area. The Times sought to set the record straight on Aug. 28: “Scientists point out there is less chance of a swimmer being attacked by a shark than struck by lightning.” And experts surmised that “there is no real increase, but merely more swimmers and sun bathers to report sighting of sharks” as well as “other large fish, which are often mistaken for sharks.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
May 24, 1960: Sam Falk of The New York Times sought the perfect shot of an aquarium shark in a year when a Jersey Shore shark attack frightened the Metro area. The Times sought to set the record straight on Aug. 28: “Scientists point out there is less chance of a swimmer being attacked by a shark than struck by lightning.” And experts surmised that “there is no real increase, but merely more swimmers and sun bathers to report sighting of sharks” as well as “other large fish, which are often mistaken for sharks.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

May 24, 1960: Sam Falk of The New York Times sought the perfect shot of an aquarium shark in a year when a Jersey Shore shark attack frightened the Metro area. The Times sought to set the record straight on Aug. 28: “Scientists point out there is less chance of a swimmer being attacked by a shark than struck by lightning.” And experts surmised that “there is no real increase, but merely more swimmers and sun bathers to report sighting of sharks” as well as “other large fish, which are often mistaken for sharks.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

April 30, 1961: As part of the “American Assault on Space,” astronauts were ordered to spend up to 24 hours underwater to simulate weightlessness and “problems of dexterity.” There was also the hope to gain traction in the space race with the Soviet Union. However, not, apparently, to gain traction in the Cold War chess race — they decided on checkers. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
April 30, 1961: As part of the “American Assault on Space,” astronauts were ordered to spend up to 24 hours underwater to simulate weightlessness and “problems of dexterity.” There was also the hope to gain traction in the space race with the Soviet Union. However, not, apparently, to gain traction in the Cold War chess race — they decided on checkers. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

April 30, 1961: As part of the “American Assault on Space,” astronauts were ordered to spend up to 24 hours underwater to simulate weightlessness and “problems of dexterity.” There was also the hope to gain traction in the space race with the Soviet Union. However, not, apparently, to gain traction in the Cold War chess race — they decided on checkers. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

Sept. 12, 1960: Flooding on West and Cortlandt Streets, brought by Hurricane Donna, which laid waste to Florida and on up the East Coast. The storm killed dozens in Florida and Puerto Rico and elsewhere. Indeed, according to the National Hurricane Center, it was the United States’ 10th costliest hurricane — adjusted for inflation, population and wealth normalization. The intersection at West and Cortlandt Streets was razed a few years later to make way for the World Trade Center. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times
Sept. 12, 1960: Flooding on West and Cortlandt Streets, brought by Hurricane Donna, which laid waste to Florida and on up the East Coast. The storm killed dozens in Florida and Puerto Rico and elsewhere. Indeed, according to the National Hurricane Center, it was the United States’ 10th costliest hurricane — adjusted for inflation, population and wealth normalization. The intersection at West and Cortlandt Streets was razed a few years later to make way for the World Trade Center. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

Sept. 12, 1960: Flooding on West and Cortlandt Streets, brought by Hurricane Donna, which laid waste to Florida and on up the East Coast. The storm killed dozens in Florida and Puerto Rico and elsewhere. Indeed, according to the National Hurricane Center, it was the United States’ 10th costliest hurricane — adjusted for inflation, population and wealth normalization. The intersection at West and Cortlandt Streets was razed a few years later to make way for the World Trade Center. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

July 1, 1960: Happy campers’ eyes were dry on a day of exodus as 7,000 children from the city boarded trains at Grand Central Terminal to be whisked to various summer camps. “By next Thursday,” The Times reported, “about 35,000 will have passed through the terminal and Pennsylvania Station. Other thousands will depart by bus.” Some children, however, stayed behind, and got soaked, as these children did in the Bronx, playing in front of a fire hydrant opened by the Police Athletic League. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times
July 1, 1960: Happy campers’ eyes were dry on a day of exodus as 7,000 children from the city boarded trains at Grand Central Terminal to be whisked to various summer camps. “By next Thursday,” The Times reported, “about 35,000 will have passed through the terminal and Pennsylvania Station. Other thousands will depart by bus.” Some children, however, stayed behind, and got soaked, as these children did in the Bronx, playing in front of a fire hydrant opened by the Police Athletic League. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

July 1, 1960: Happy campers’ eyes were dry on a day of exodus as 7,000 children from the city boarded trains at Grand Central Terminal to be whisked to various summer camps. “By next Thursday,” The Times reported, “about 35,000 will have passed through the terminal and Pennsylvania Station. Other thousands will depart by bus.” Some children, however, stayed behind, and got soaked, as these children did in the Bronx, playing in front of a fire hydrant opened by the Police Athletic League. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

March 13, 1947: Coiled firehoses at the scene of a South Street blaze, published in 1951 in a Sunday magazine roundup of fire stories, “some fairly curious recent episodes in which fire was the villain,” for National Fire Prevention Week. Some of those curious episodes included a man who tried to kill mosquitos by tossing flour into the air and brushing a lit torch through the dust cloud (it “flattened his home”) or a man who, after a fight with his wife, wrote a fake suicide note to scare her after she walked out, then turned on the gas. “He waited a while, had another little drink or two, and tried to light a cigarette. A month or so later he was out of the hospital, but the house had to be rebuilt.” The piece did not report if there was a reconciliation. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
March 13, 1947: Coiled firehoses at the scene of a South Street blaze, published in 1951 in a Sunday magazine roundup of fire stories, “some fairly curious recent episodes in which fire was the villain,” for National Fire Prevention Week. Some of those curious episodes included a man who tried to kill mosquitos by tossing flour into the air and brushing a lit torch through the dust cloud (it “flattened his home”) or a man who, after a fight with his wife, wrote a fake suicide note to scare her after she walked out, then turned on the gas. “He waited a while, had another little drink or two, and tried to light a cigarette. A month or so later he was out of the hospital, but the house had to be rebuilt.” The piece did not report if there was a reconciliation. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

March 13, 1947: Coiled firehoses at the scene of a South Street blaze, published in 1951 in a Sunday magazine roundup of fire stories, “some fairly curious recent episodes in which fire was the villain,” for National Fire Prevention Week. Some of those curious episodes included a man who tried to kill mosquitos by tossing flour into the air and brushing a lit torch through the dust cloud (it “flattened his home”) or a man who, after a fight with his wife, wrote a fake suicide note to scare her after she walked out, then turned on the gas. “He waited a while, had another little drink or two, and tried to light a cigarette. A month or so later he was out of the hospital, but the house had to be rebuilt.” The piece did not report if there was a reconciliation. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

Jan. 13, 1977: A four-alarm fire on Jones Street in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, part of, apparently, a phenomenon: “Fireman Victor Bengyak, a veteran member of Engine Company 24 in the West Village, recalled during the fire that Jones Street had had ‘an amazing number of major-alarm fires.’” As had the rest of the city: 19 companies from outer boroughs responded to seven multi-alarm fires in Manhattan that night, to cover the depleted forces addressing the Jones Street building. Photo: Paul Hosefros/The New York Times
Jan. 13, 1977: A four-alarm fire on Jones Street in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, part of, apparently, a phenomenon: “Fireman Victor Bengyak, a veteran member of Engine Company 24 in the West Village, recalled during the fire that Jones Street had had ‘an amazing number of major-alarm fires.’” As had the rest of the city: 19 companies from outer boroughs responded to seven multi-alarm fires in Manhattan that night, to cover the depleted forces addressing the Jones Street building. Photo: Paul Hosefros/The New York Times

Jan. 13, 1977: A four-alarm fire on Jones Street in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, part of, apparently, a phenomenon: “Fireman Victor Bengyak, a veteran member of Engine Company 24 in the West Village, recalled during the fire that Jones Street had had ‘an amazing number of major-alarm fires.’” As had the rest of the city: 19 companies from outer boroughs responded to seven multi-alarm fires in Manhattan that night, to cover the depleted forces addressing the Jones Street building. Photo: Paul Hosefros/The New York Times

Jan. 4, 1933: The oceanliner L’Atlantique, en route to Cherbourg from Bordeaux for “annual overhauling,” caught fire near the Normandy coast, near its destination,  and “rumors of sabotage were current.” The fire had spread so swiftly, starting from somewhere in the first-class quarters, that its cause couldn’t be determined, and 17 of its 238 crew were presumed dead (and, later, five stowaways were found dead). A literal tug-o’-war ensued, as ships from France, Germany and the Netherlands vied to tow it back and receive compensation. A French and Dutch ship reached the beleaguered vessel first, and “the tugs started pulling in opposite directions, getting nowhere and endangering the L’Atlantique even further.” Order was restored by a nearby warship. Photo: The New York Times
Jan. 4, 1933: The oceanliner L’Atlantique, en route to Cherbourg from Bordeaux for “annual overhauling,” caught fire near the Normandy coast, near its destination,  and “rumors of sabotage were current.” The fire had spread so swiftly, starting from somewhere in the first-class quarters, that its cause couldn’t be determined, and 17 of its 238 crew were presumed dead (and, later, five stowaways were found dead). A literal tug-o’-war ensued, as ships from France, Germany and the Netherlands vied to tow it back and receive compensation. A French and Dutch ship reached the beleaguered vessel first, and “the tugs started pulling in opposite directions, getting nowhere and endangering the L’Atlantique even further.” Order was restored by a nearby warship. Photo: The New York Times

Jan. 4, 1933: The oceanliner L’Atlantique, en route to Cherbourg from Bordeaux for “annual overhauling,” caught fire near the Normandy coast, near its destination,  and “rumors of sabotage were current.” The fire had spread so swiftly, starting from somewhere in the first-class quarters, that its cause couldn’t be determined, and 17 of its 238 crew were presumed dead (and, later, five stowaways were found dead). A literal tug-o’-war ensued, as ships from France, Germany and the Netherlands vied to tow it back and receive compensation. A French and Dutch ship reached the beleaguered vessel first, and “the tugs started pulling in opposite directions, getting nowhere and endangering the L’Atlantique even further.” Order was restored by a nearby warship. Photo: The New York Times

May 14, 1935: The American yacht Yankee, towed into Gosport, in southern England, to compete in the America’s Cup (which is an international award named for a schooner named America, which raced around the Isle of Wight and earned the inaugural trophy in 1851). After months of fervent speculation and drama, the Yankee had a mixed record,  often bested by the Endeavour and the Astra, before being scrapped in 1941. Photo: The New York Times
May 14, 1935: The American yacht Yankee, towed into Gosport, in southern England, to compete in the America’s Cup (which is an international award named for a schooner named America, which raced around the Isle of Wight and earned the inaugural trophy in 1851). After months of fervent speculation and drama, the Yankee had a mixed record,  often bested by the Endeavour and the Astra, before being scrapped in 1941. Photo: The New York Times

May 14, 1935: The American yacht Yankee, towed into Gosport, in southern England, to compete in the America’s Cup (which is an international award named for a schooner named America, which raced around the Isle of Wight and earned the inaugural trophy in 1851). After months of fervent speculation and drama, the Yankee had a mixed record,  often bested by the Endeavour and the Astra, before being scrapped in 1941. Photo: The New York Times