The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: vintage
April 7, 1946: “Despite Cain’s stare, Queen Victoria hasn’t a hangover. The ‘icebag’ protects her elaborately carved crown,” The Times reported in the magazine. “Wonderful as are the works in the display galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art — one of the five or six great treasure houses of this world — a large part of the museum’s wonders is hidden from view in some forty storerooms, most of them underground,” wrote Charles Grutzner. Other pictures of some of the museum’s treasures sport innuendo-rife captions: “Bronze nudes and a marble Antigone share museum’s nether regions with a giant boar and undraped Venuses.” Photo: The New York Times
April 7, 1946: “Despite Cain’s stare, Queen Victoria hasn’t a hangover. The ‘icebag’ protects her elaborately carved crown,” The Times reported in the magazine. “Wonderful as are the works in the display galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art — one of the five or six great treasure houses of this world — a large part of the museum’s wonders is hidden from view in some forty storerooms, most of them underground,” wrote Charles Grutzner. Other pictures of some of the museum’s treasures sport innuendo-rife captions: “Bronze nudes and a marble Antigone share museum’s nether regions with a giant boar and undraped Venuses.” Photo: The New York Times

April 7, 1946: “Despite Cain’s stare, Queen Victoria hasn’t a hangover. The ‘icebag’ protects her elaborately carved crown,” The Times reported in the magazine. “Wonderful as are the works in the display galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art — one of the five or six great treasure houses of this world — a large part of the museum’s wonders is hidden from view in some forty storerooms, most of them underground,” wrote Charles Grutzner. Other pictures of some of the museum’s treasures sport innuendo-rife captions: “Bronze nudes and a marble Antigone share museum’s nether regions with a giant boar and undraped Venuses.” Photo: The New York Times

June 3, 1953: “In the tramp of ten thousand marching feet the oldest among the spectators heard an echo of the might and majesty of the greatest empire that the world has ever known,” a breathless reporter for The New York Times wrote on the occasion of Queen Elizabeth II’s crowning. “Only the British, among all the peoples of the earth, could have staged such a display and every moment of it seemed to be savored by an appreciative public drawn from the four quarters of the globe and from virtually every nation and people under the sun.” A far cry from these days, when it seems the only thing keeping the monarchy from receding into obscurity is a single tiny baby. Photo: The New York Times
June 3, 1953: “In the tramp of ten thousand marching feet the oldest among the spectators heard an echo of the might and majesty of the greatest empire that the world has ever known,” a breathless reporter for The New York Times wrote on the occasion of Queen Elizabeth II’s crowning. “Only the British, among all the peoples of the earth, could have staged such a display and every moment of it seemed to be savored by an appreciative public drawn from the four quarters of the globe and from virtually every nation and people under the sun.” A far cry from these days, when it seems the only thing keeping the monarchy from receding into obscurity is a single tiny baby. Photo: The New York Times

June 3, 1953: “In the tramp of ten thousand marching feet the oldest among the spectators heard an echo of the might and majesty of the greatest empire that the world has ever known,” a breathless reporter for The New York Times wrote on the occasion of Queen Elizabeth II’s crowning. “Only the British, among all the peoples of the earth, could have staged such a display and every moment of it seemed to be savored by an appreciative public drawn from the four quarters of the globe and from virtually every nation and people under the sun.” A far cry from these days, when it seems the only thing keeping the monarchy from receding into obscurity is a single tiny baby. Photo: The New York Times

Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and waiting. “I’ll probably get fired,” a secretary was quoted complaining. “But I’ve waited this long so I’m going to wait till she comes down — even if I don’t make it back to the office before closing time.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times
Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and waiting. “I’ll probably get fired,” a secretary was quoted complaining. “But I’ve waited this long so I’m going to wait till she comes down — even if I don’t make it back to the office before closing time.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and waiting. “I’ll probably get fired,” a secretary was quoted complaining. “But I’ve waited this long so I’m going to wait till she comes down — even if I don’t make it back to the office before closing time.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

In 1955, Easter fell on April 10, and in the day’s paper a stand-alone photo — taken on Good Friday — showed Torrance Helen watering lilies on the 64th floor of the RCA Building (30 Rockefeller Plaza). The picture ran near a mention of an egg-rolling event in Central Park that drew 1,500 children to push eggs across the Great Lawn, and a prediction of 70 degree weather on Sunday. The story provided a variety of other Easter observations, including one for Sing Sing’s 1,450 prisoners, who would “get an opportunity to attend Easter services in chapels bedecked with plants and flowers, enjoy a special dinner and see the movie, ‘Gone With the Wind.’ ” Photo:
In 1955, Easter fell on April 10, and in the day’s paper a stand-alone photo — taken on Good Friday — showed Torrance Helen watering lilies on the 64th floor of the RCA Building (30 Rockefeller Plaza). The picture ran near a mention of an egg-rolling event in Central Park that drew 1,500 children to push eggs across the Great Lawn, and a prediction of 70 degree weather on Sunday. The story provided a variety of other Easter observations, including one for Sing Sing’s 1,450 prisoners, who would “get an opportunity to attend Easter services in chapels bedecked with plants and flowers, enjoy a special dinner and see the movie, ‘Gone With the Wind.’ ” Photo:

In 1955, Easter fell on April 10, and in the day’s paper a stand-alone photo — taken on Good Friday — showed Torrance Helen watering lilies on the 64th floor of the RCA Building (30 Rockefeller Plaza). The picture ran near a mention of an egg-rolling event in Central Park that drew 1,500 children to push eggs across the Great Lawn, and a prediction of 70 degree weather on Sunday. The story provided a variety of other Easter observations, including one for Sing Sing’s 1,450 prisoners, who would “get an opportunity to attend Easter services in chapels bedecked with plants and flowers, enjoy a special dinner and see the movie, ‘Gone With the Wind.’ ” Photo:

Smog over New York, 1966: Around Thanksgiving, smog swept into the city, prompting a flurry of articles, dramatic front page pictures and emergency alerts in several states. Though hospitals reported that no one was immediately injured by the smog, the long-term effects were cited as a concern, and Mayor John V. Lindsay — back in City Hall after a Bermuda vacation — discussed a plan to require buildings to dispose of garbage by means other than incinerators. Would rents increase as a result? “I can’t say for sure. There’s a problem,” the mayor said. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Smog over New York, 1966: Around Thanksgiving, smog swept into the city, prompting a flurry of articles, dramatic front page pictures and emergency alerts in several states. Though hospitals reported that no one was immediately injured by the smog, the long-term effects were cited as a concern, and Mayor John V. Lindsay — back in City Hall after a Bermuda vacation — discussed a plan to require buildings to dispose of garbage by means other than incinerators. Would rents increase as a result? “I can’t say for sure. There’s a problem,” the mayor said. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Smog over New York, 1966: Around Thanksgiving, smog swept into the city, prompting a flurry of articles, dramatic front page pictures and emergency alerts in several states. Though hospitals reported that no one was immediately injured by the smog, the long-term effects were cited as a concern, and Mayor John V. Lindsay — back in City Hall after a Bermuda vacation — discussed a plan to require buildings to dispose of garbage by means other than incinerators. Would rents increase as a result? “I can’t say for sure. There’s a problem,” the mayor said. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

March 8, 1961: In the years following the second World War, finding a home for the thousands of Liberty ships that survived the fighting — like these on the Hudson River — was a challenge for the Federal Maritime Board. Many were sold, many were decommissioned and scrapped; some became floating docks, another, a floating nuclear station. Photo: The New York Times
March 8, 1961: In the years following the second World War, finding a home for the thousands of Liberty ships that survived the fighting — like these on the Hudson River — was a challenge for the Federal Maritime Board. Many were sold, many were decommissioned and scrapped; some became floating docks, another, a floating nuclear station. Photo: The New York Times

March 8, 1961: In the years following the second World War, finding a home for the thousands of Liberty ships that survived the fighting — like these on the Hudson River — was a challenge for the Federal Maritime Board. Many were sold, many were decommissioned and scrapped; some became floating docks, another, a floating nuclear station. Photo: The New York Times

July 19, 1954: One of the more boastful cruise ships to set sail since the Titanic, the superliner United States (“America’s largest, fastest and newest passenger liner”) had an appointment with its own special “beauty parlor” in Bayonne, N.J. “A spokesman for the line said this would be the third time in her two-year career that she would be looked over below the waterline,” The Times reported. “Work to be performed at Bayonne will include bottom scraping, painting and a check of her propellers.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times
July 19, 1954: One of the more boastful cruise ships to set sail since the Titanic, the superliner United States (“America’s largest, fastest and newest passenger liner”) had an appointment with its own special “beauty parlor” in Bayonne, N.J. “A spokesman for the line said this would be the third time in her two-year career that she would be looked over below the waterline,” The Times reported. “Work to be performed at Bayonne will include bottom scraping, painting and a check of her propellers.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

July 19, 1954: One of the more boastful cruise ships to set sail since the Titanic, the superliner United States (“America’s largest, fastest and newest passenger liner”) had an appointment with its own special “beauty parlor” in Bayonne, N.J. “A spokesman for the line said this would be the third time in her two-year career that she would be looked over below the waterline,” The Times reported. “Work to be performed at Bayonne will include bottom scraping, painting and a check of her propellers.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

Jan. 23, 1969: Boarding at Pier 86 at 46th Street in Manhattan, passengers walked the gangway to the superliner United States as a strike of longshoremen was hurting shipping-dependent industries. Truckers, for example, had had nothing to transport for 24 days. President Nixon was getting involved while American ocean liners’ departmental supervisors were reported to have taken over the work of their striking dockers, carting supplies onto boats. “I’m not hungry, just tired,” The Times quoted a pier supervisor as saying. “I only know that I have muscles I never dreamed of before.”   Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Jan. 23, 1969: Boarding at Pier 86 at 46th Street in Manhattan, passengers walked the gangway to the superliner United States as a strike of longshoremen was hurting shipping-dependent industries. Truckers, for example, had had nothing to transport for 24 days. President Nixon was getting involved while American ocean liners’ departmental supervisors were reported to have taken over the work of their striking dockers, carting supplies onto boats. “I’m not hungry, just tired,” The Times quoted a pier supervisor as saying. “I only know that I have muscles I never dreamed of before.”   Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Jan. 23, 1969: Boarding at Pier 86 at 46th Street in Manhattan, passengers walked the gangway to the superliner United States as a strike of longshoremen was hurting shipping-dependent industries. Truckers, for example, had had nothing to transport for 24 days. President Nixon was getting involved while American ocean liners’ departmental supervisors were reported to have taken over the work of their striking dockers, carting supplies onto boats. “I’m not hungry, just tired,” The Times quoted a pier supervisor as saying. “I only know that I have muscles I never dreamed of before.”   Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

April 4, 1956: Hugh Wiley, “the 29-year-old seagoing horseman on leave from the Navy” led his horse up a chartered plane at Idlewild, now Kennedy Airport, for Hamburg, where the Olympic riding team was en route for training before arriving in Stockholm. Though the 1956 Olympics were held in Melbourne, Australia, Australia’s fear of horse-borne diseases meant a six-month quarantine; the International Olympic Committee decided it was easier to host the horse events in Europe. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times
April 4, 1956: Hugh Wiley, “the 29-year-old seagoing horseman on leave from the Navy” led his horse up a chartered plane at Idlewild, now Kennedy Airport, for Hamburg, where the Olympic riding team was en route for training before arriving in Stockholm. Though the 1956 Olympics were held in Melbourne, Australia, Australia’s fear of horse-borne diseases meant a six-month quarantine; the International Olympic Committee decided it was easier to host the horse events in Europe. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

April 4, 1956: Hugh Wiley, “the 29-year-old seagoing horseman on leave from the Navy” led his horse up a chartered plane at Idlewild, now Kennedy Airport, for Hamburg, where the Olympic riding team was en route for training before arriving in Stockholm. Though the 1956 Olympics were held in Melbourne, Australia, Australia’s fear of horse-borne diseases meant a six-month quarantine; the International Olympic Committee decided it was easier to host the horse events in Europe. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times