The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

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Sept. 30, 1956: The Times feted the Waldorf-Astoria hotel on its 25th anniversary (at its Park Avenue site) with a spread in the magazine, which sought to determine why the place was better than any other first-class hotel. The article also explored the provenance of the hyphen. (It was originally the Waldorf hotel; quoth the article, “A prime jape of the day was to say ‘Meet me at the Hyphen.’ ”) Perhaps a lesser known fact: The newer iteration, which opened on Oct. 1, 1931, “operated in the red for a dozen years.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
Sept. 30, 1956: The Times feted the Waldorf-Astoria hotel on its 25th anniversary (at its Park Avenue site) with a spread in the magazine, which sought to determine why the place was better than any other first-class hotel. The article also explored the provenance of the hyphen. (It was originally the Waldorf hotel; quoth the article, “A prime jape of the day was to say ‘Meet me at the Hyphen.’ ”) Perhaps a lesser known fact: The newer iteration, which opened on Oct. 1, 1931, “operated in the red for a dozen years.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

Sept. 30, 1956: The Times feted the Waldorf-Astoria hotel on its 25th anniversary (at its Park Avenue site) with a spread in the magazine, which sought to determine why the place was better than any other first-class hotel. The article also explored the provenance of the hyphen. (It was originally the Waldorf hotel; quoth the article, “A prime jape of the day was to say ‘Meet me at the Hyphen.’ ”) Perhaps a lesser known fact: The newer iteration, which opened on Oct. 1, 1931, “operated in the red for a dozen years.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

May 3, 1968: “There were no sticks or pucks and the only ice around was in the drinks,” reported Enid Nemy in The Times, describing a specially invented version of hockey at the St. Regis Hotel, where the elite bounced a balloon around a ballroom at a benefit for the Girl Scouts. “It turned out to be a rather ephemeral version of basketball,” Ms. Nemy wrote. The game had a penalty box (another table), referees and rules, with teams even opting for the balloon over a beach ball for fear of breaking the chandeliers. Opposing players had gardening gloves to know whose side they were on, and the “mistress of ceremonies” said “kicking or dribbling was permitted but warned against biting, gouging or breaking balloons with fingernails.” “I’m glad I’m crippled and can’t play this game,” said one observer, who had hurt his wrist in an accident. Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times
May 3, 1968: “There were no sticks or pucks and the only ice around was in the drinks,” reported Enid Nemy in The Times, describing a specially invented version of hockey at the St. Regis Hotel, where the elite bounced a balloon around a ballroom at a benefit for the Girl Scouts. “It turned out to be a rather ephemeral version of basketball,” Ms. Nemy wrote. The game had a penalty box (another table), referees and rules, with teams even opting for the balloon over a beach ball for fear of breaking the chandeliers. Opposing players had gardening gloves to know whose side they were on, and the “mistress of ceremonies” said “kicking or dribbling was permitted but warned against biting, gouging or breaking balloons with fingernails.” “I’m glad I’m crippled and can’t play this game,” said one observer, who had hurt his wrist in an accident. Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times

May 3, 1968: “There were no sticks or pucks and the only ice around was in the drinks,” reported Enid Nemy in The Times, describing a specially invented version of hockey at the St. Regis Hotel, where the elite bounced a balloon around a ballroom at a benefit for the Girl Scouts. “It turned out to be a rather ephemeral version of basketball,” Ms. Nemy wrote. The game had a penalty box (another table), referees and rules, with teams even opting for the balloon over a beach ball for fear of breaking the chandeliers. Opposing players had gardening gloves to know whose side they were on, and the “mistress of ceremonies” said “kicking or dribbling was permitted but warned against biting, gouging or breaking balloons with fingernails.” “I’m glad I’m crippled and can’t play this game,” said one observer, who had hurt his wrist in an accident. Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times

Sept. 2, 1971: Fans reached for a foul ball hit by Horace Clarke of the Yankees in the first inning of a 2-0 loss to the Washington Senators, who maintained a “strange dominance over the Yankees,” who managed only four hits. Not three weeks later, the Senators were given approval to move to Texas to become the Rangers. Senators fans were so angry that some stormed the field during the team’s last game in Washington, another against the Yankees, and someone made off with first base. The umpire called a forfeit in favor of the Yankees. Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times
Sept. 2, 1971: Fans reached for a foul ball hit by Horace Clarke of the Yankees in the first inning of a 2-0 loss to the Washington Senators, who maintained a “strange dominance over the Yankees,” who managed only four hits. Not three weeks later, the Senators were given approval to move to Texas to become the Rangers. Senators fans were so angry that some stormed the field during the team’s last game in Washington, another against the Yankees, and someone made off with first base. The umpire called a forfeit in favor of the Yankees. Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

Sept. 2, 1971: Fans reached for a foul ball hit by Horace Clarke of the Yankees in the first inning of a 2-0 loss to the Washington Senators, who maintained a “strange dominance over the Yankees,” who managed only four hits. Not three weeks later, the Senators were given approval to move to Texas to become the Rangers. Senators fans were so angry that some stormed the field during the team’s last game in Washington, another against the Yankees, and someone made off with first base. The umpire called a forfeit in favor of the Yankees. Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

Nov. 8, 1944: “Times Square’s first wartime national election crowd,” reported The Times, “numbering from 250,000 to 500,000 predominantly and noisily pro-Roosevelt,” convened to ring in an unprecedented fourth term for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. “There was little horn-blowing, little clangor of bells and din of rattles,” the article said. “Boys and men who ordinarily might have provided all the sound effects were far from Times Square, engaged in grimmer noisemaking.” Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times
Nov. 8, 1944: “Times Square’s first wartime national election crowd,” reported The Times, “numbering from 250,000 to 500,000 predominantly and noisily pro-Roosevelt,” convened to ring in an unprecedented fourth term for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. “There was little horn-blowing, little clangor of bells and din of rattles,” the article said. “Boys and men who ordinarily might have provided all the sound effects were far from Times Square, engaged in grimmer noisemaking.” Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

Nov. 8, 1944: “Times Square’s first wartime national election crowd,” reported The Times, “numbering from 250,000 to 500,000 predominantly and noisily pro-Roosevelt,” convened to ring in an unprecedented fourth term for President Franklin D. Roosevelt. “There was little horn-blowing, little clangor of bells and din of rattles,” the article said. “Boys and men who ordinarily might have provided all the sound effects were far from Times Square, engaged in grimmer noisemaking.” Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

July 10, 1960: In Southern California, delegates descended on the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena to nominate the Democratic candidate for president; John F. Kennedy won on the first ballot, almost doubling the votes that went to Lyndon B. Johnson. This photo adorned The Times Magazine cover, which provided a sort of guide to the convention’s goings-on, the “big powwow.” Photo: The New York Times
July 10, 1960: In Southern California, delegates descended on the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena to nominate the Democratic candidate for president; John F. Kennedy won on the first ballot, almost doubling the votes that went to Lyndon B. Johnson. This photo adorned The Times Magazine cover, which provided a sort of guide to the convention’s goings-on, the “big powwow.” Photo: The New York Times

July 10, 1960: In Southern California, delegates descended on the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena to nominate the Democratic candidate for president; John F. Kennedy won on the first ballot, almost doubling the votes that went to Lyndon B. Johnson. This photo adorned The Times Magazine cover, which provided a sort of guide to the convention’s goings-on, the “big powwow.” Photo: The New York Times

May 15, 1977: An article in The Times Magazine presented President Jimmy Carter, early in his single term, as a “Maestro of the Media,” explaining his success on the screen. “These are the glory days,” reported Richard Reeves, “and the man can seem to do no electronic wrong.” To the left of the president’s ear, Barry Jagoda gave some last-minute advice. Photo: Theresa Zabala/The New York Times
May 15, 1977: An article in The Times Magazine presented President Jimmy Carter, early in his single term, as a “Maestro of the Media,” explaining his success on the screen. “These are the glory days,” reported Richard Reeves, “and the man can seem to do no electronic wrong.” To the left of the president’s ear, Barry Jagoda gave some last-minute advice. Photo: Theresa Zabala/The New York Times

May 15, 1977: An article in The Times Magazine presented President Jimmy Carter, early in his single term, as a “Maestro of the Media,” explaining his success on the screen. “These are the glory days,” reported Richard Reeves, “and the man can seem to do no electronic wrong.” To the left of the president’s ear, Barry Jagoda gave some last-minute advice. Photo: Theresa Zabala/The New York Times

Oct. 4, 1949: How better to sell the government’s debt than with multitudes of the smiling visage of President Harry S. Truman? Such was the thinking in 1949, when a group of “the country’s top cartoonists and comic-strip artists” was assembled to accompany a traveling exhibit of their work to help sell government bonds. Before the tour began, reported The Times, they gathered in the Rose Garden to meet with the president, face to faces. Photo: Bruce Hoertel/The New York Times
Oct. 4, 1949: How better to sell the government’s debt than with multitudes of the smiling visage of President Harry S. Truman? Such was the thinking in 1949, when a group of “the country’s top cartoonists and comic-strip artists” was assembled to accompany a traveling exhibit of their work to help sell government bonds. Before the tour began, reported The Times, they gathered in the Rose Garden to meet with the president, face to faces. Photo: Bruce Hoertel/The New York Times

Oct. 4, 1949: How better to sell the government’s debt than with multitudes of the smiling visage of President Harry S. Truman? Such was the thinking in 1949, when a group of “the country’s top cartoonists and comic-strip artists” was assembled to accompany a traveling exhibit of their work to help sell government bonds. Before the tour began, reported The Times, they gathered in the Rose Garden to meet with the president, face to faces. Photo: Bruce Hoertel/The New York Times