The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

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In October 1933, 6,000 Boy Scouts descended on Long Island in what was the largest of an annual pilgrimage to the grave of Theodore Roosevelt. Held every year since the president’s death in 1919, the event was to commemorate his birthday. This time, the “veteran National Scout Commander” Daniel Carter Beard, at the age of 86, led the mile-and-a-half walk to the site in Oyster Bay. Photo: The New York Times
In October 1933, 6,000 Boy Scouts descended on Long Island in what was the largest of an annual pilgrimage to the grave of Theodore Roosevelt. Held every year since the president’s death in 1919, the event was to commemorate his birthday. This time, the “veteran National Scout Commander” Daniel Carter Beard, at the age of 86, led the mile-and-a-half walk to the site in Oyster Bay. Photo: The New York Times

In October 1933, 6,000 Boy Scouts descended on Long Island in what was the largest of an annual pilgrimage to the grave of Theodore Roosevelt. Held every year since the president’s death in 1919, the event was to commemorate his birthday. This time, the “veteran National Scout Commander” Daniel Carter Beard, at the age of 86, led the mile-and-a-half walk to the site in Oyster Bay. Photo: The New York Times

A stamp on the back of this picture from Japan reads April 25, 1945, on which date The Times had blaring headlines about the state of the war in Europe (it was winding down), and a smaller article at the bottom of the front page about an impasse at Okinawa, in the Pacific, that “American infantrymen” had brought to an end. “The fighting was heavy along the entire front as the doughboys moved cautiously from one fortification to another and there were as yet no indications of large gains,” The Times reported. Photo: The New York Times
A stamp on the back of this picture from Japan reads April 25, 1945, on which date The Times had blaring headlines about the state of the war in Europe (it was winding down), and a smaller article at the bottom of the front page about an impasse at Okinawa, in the Pacific, that “American infantrymen” had brought to an end. “The fighting was heavy along the entire front as the doughboys moved cautiously from one fortification to another and there were as yet no indications of large gains,” The Times reported. Photo: The New York Times

A stamp on the back of this picture from Japan reads April 25, 1945, on which date The Times had blaring headlines about the state of the war in Europe (it was winding down), and a smaller article at the bottom of the front page about an impasse at Okinawa, in the Pacific, that “American infantrymen” had brought to an end. “The fighting was heavy along the entire front as the doughboys moved cautiously from one fortification to another and there were as yet no indications of large gains,” The Times reported. Photo: The New York Times

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos
A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos

Aug. 12, 1959: “4 Chimp Children Take Up the City Ways,” the headline said, explaining how these chimpanzees at the Bronx Zoo leapt into the city water on hot New York days, even though they would never swim in the Congo. “On warmer mornings, they get wet without coaxing although they squeal and hesitate like human 4-year-olds,” The Times reported. As well as smooch their masters like human 4-year-olds. Photo: Arthur Brower/The New York Times
Aug. 12, 1959: “4 Chimp Children Take Up the City Ways,” the headline said, explaining how these chimpanzees at the Bronx Zoo leapt into the city water on hot New York days, even though they would never swim in the Congo. “On warmer mornings, they get wet without coaxing although they squeal and hesitate like human 4-year-olds,” The Times reported. As well as smooch their masters like human 4-year-olds. Photo: Arthur Brower/The New York Times

Aug. 12, 1959: “4 Chimp Children Take Up the City Ways,” the headline said, explaining how these chimpanzees at the Bronx Zoo leapt into the city water on hot New York days, even though they would never swim in the Congo. “On warmer mornings, they get wet without coaxing although they squeal and hesitate like human 4-year-olds,” The Times reported. As well as smooch their masters like human 4-year-olds. Photo: Arthur Brower/The New York Times

May 12, 1958: A contact sheet from a photo shoot at the Bronx Zoo for which an emperor penguin named Jill was the star, occasioning the addition of two duck-billed platypuses, which called “attention to the many other outstanding specimens” at the zoo. “The emperors are hand-fed — five pounds of mackerel a day,” her keeper, Chappie Solanto, told the Times magazine. “The public thinks they look like old men. And people are surprised at their fatness and that they don’t go into the water like other penguins here.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
May 12, 1958: A contact sheet from a photo shoot at the Bronx Zoo for which an emperor penguin named Jill was the star, occasioning the addition of two duck-billed platypuses, which called “attention to the many other outstanding specimens” at the zoo. “The emperors are hand-fed — five pounds of mackerel a day,” her keeper, Chappie Solanto, told the Times magazine. “The public thinks they look like old men. And people are surprised at their fatness and that they don’t go into the water like other penguins here.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

May 12, 1958: A contact sheet from a photo shoot at the Bronx Zoo for which an emperor penguin named Jill was the star, occasioning the addition of two duck-billed platypuses, which called “attention to the many other outstanding specimens” at the zoo. “The emperors are hand-fed — five pounds of mackerel a day,” her keeper, Chappie Solanto, told the Times magazine. “The public thinks they look like old men. And people are surprised at their fatness and that they don’t go into the water like other penguins here.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

April 12, 1956: A colony of Antarctica’s comical flightless bird, the penguin, waddling across icy rock in an unpublished picture from a spread of images taken during the United States-led mission, Operation Deepfreeze, to reach the South Pole. The Cold War-era operation was in preparation for the International Geophysical Year, a period of international cooperation, including that of the Soviet Union, to explore Earth’s most hard-to-reach places, plumbing the depths, soaring the heights and crossing its underbelly. Photo: Bernard Kalb/The New York Times.
April 12, 1956: A colony of Antarctica’s comical flightless bird, the penguin, waddling across icy rock in an unpublished picture from a spread of images taken during the United States-led mission, Operation Deepfreeze, to reach the South Pole. The Cold War-era operation was in preparation for the International Geophysical Year, a period of international cooperation, including that of the Soviet Union, to explore Earth’s most hard-to-reach places, plumbing the depths, soaring the heights and crossing its underbelly. Photo: Bernard Kalb/The New York Times.

April 12, 1956: A colony of Antarctica’s comical flightless bird, the penguin, waddling across icy rock in an unpublished picture from a spread of images taken during the United States-led mission, Operation Deepfreeze, to reach the South Pole. The Cold War-era operation was in preparation for the International Geophysical Year, a period of international cooperation, including that of the Soviet Union, to explore Earth’s most hard-to-reach places, plumbing the depths, soaring the heights and crossing its underbelly. Photo: Bernard Kalb/The New York Times.

Jan. 21, 1975: Three inches of snow accumulated in parts of northern New Jersey, including Allendale, closing schools and hindering traffic of virtually every variety — plane, train, automobile — but not toboggan. In other news of the day, the front page reported that 10 hostages were released by terrorists at a Paris airport and that a police officer was shot to death in a Greenwich Village subway. Photo: Joyce Dopkeen/The New York Times
Jan. 21, 1975: Three inches of snow accumulated in parts of northern New Jersey, including Allendale, closing schools and hindering traffic of virtually every variety — plane, train, automobile — but not toboggan. In other news of the day, the front page reported that 10 hostages were released by terrorists at a Paris airport and that a police officer was shot to death in a Greenwich Village subway. Photo: Joyce Dopkeen/The New York Times

Jan. 21, 1975: Three inches of snow accumulated in parts of northern New Jersey, including Allendale, closing schools and hindering traffic of virtually every variety — plane, train, automobile — but not toboggan. In other news of the day, the front page reported that 10 hostages were released by terrorists at a Paris airport and that a police officer was shot to death in a Greenwich Village subway. Photo: Joyce Dopkeen/The New York Times

Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

July 6, 1953: With the photographer Sam Falk visible on the front of the helicopter’s bubble shield, two police officers sat ready at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn to begin a patrol. “The helicopters of the Police Department Aviation Bureau, which heretofore flew daily at random all over the city, will start today to patrol the city’s waterfront, waterways and the five boroughs on a regular ‘beat’ basis,” The Times reported two weeks earlier. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
July 6, 1953: With the photographer Sam Falk visible on the front of the helicopter’s bubble shield, two police officers sat ready at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn to begin a patrol. “The helicopters of the Police Department Aviation Bureau, which heretofore flew daily at random all over the city, will start today to patrol the city’s waterfront, waterways and the five boroughs on a regular ‘beat’ basis,” The Times reported two weeks earlier. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

July 6, 1953: With the photographer Sam Falk visible on the front of the helicopter’s bubble shield, two police officers sat ready at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn to begin a patrol. “The helicopters of the Police Department Aviation Bureau, which heretofore flew daily at random all over the city, will start today to patrol the city’s waterfront, waterways and the five boroughs on a regular ‘beat’ basis,” The Times reported two weeks earlier. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

Jan. 17, 1956: From the annals of improbable aircraft, the Army’s aerocycle, tested at Camp Kilmer, N.J., by Chris Kopp of de Lackner Helicopter. Like a wacky harbinger of Segway technology, the aerocycle was reported to have “two advantages over the conventional helicopter — it is more stable and it is easier to control because the operator steers it by leaning his body in the desired direction.” For the overdetermined navigator who feared leaning too far and falling on the rotating blades, there was a safety belt, and a rubber doughnut absorbed the shock if the pilot came down too hard. Photo: Patrick Burns/The New York Times
Jan. 17, 1956: From the annals of improbable aircraft, the Army’s aerocycle, tested at Camp Kilmer, N.J., by Chris Kopp of de Lackner Helicopter. Like a wacky harbinger of Segway technology, the aerocycle was reported to have “two advantages over the conventional helicopter — it is more stable and it is easier to control because the operator steers it by leaning his body in the desired direction.” For the overdetermined navigator who feared leaning too far and falling on the rotating blades, there was a safety belt, and a rubber doughnut absorbed the shock if the pilot came down too hard. Photo: Patrick Burns/The New York Times

Jan. 17, 1956: From the annals of improbable aircraft, the Army’s aerocycle, tested at Camp Kilmer, N.J., by Chris Kopp of de Lackner Helicopter. Like a wacky harbinger of Segway technology, the aerocycle was reported to have “two advantages over the conventional helicopter — it is more stable and it is easier to control because the operator steers it by leaning his body in the desired direction.” For the overdetermined navigator who feared leaning too far and falling on the rotating blades, there was a safety belt, and a rubber doughnut absorbed the shock if the pilot came down too hard. Photo: Patrick Burns/The New York Times