The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

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Smog over New York, 1966: Around Thanksgiving, smog swept into the city, prompting a flurry of articles, dramatic front page pictures and emergency alerts in several states. Though hospitals reported that no one was immediately injured by the smog, the long-term effects were cited as a concern, and Mayor John V. Lindsay — back in City Hall after a Bermuda vacation — discussed a plan to require buildings to dispose of garbage by means other than incinerators. Would rents increase as a result? “I can’t say for sure. There’s a problem,” the mayor said. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Smog over New York, 1966: Around Thanksgiving, smog swept into the city, prompting a flurry of articles, dramatic front page pictures and emergency alerts in several states. Though hospitals reported that no one was immediately injured by the smog, the long-term effects were cited as a concern, and Mayor John V. Lindsay — back in City Hall after a Bermuda vacation — discussed a plan to require buildings to dispose of garbage by means other than incinerators. Would rents increase as a result? “I can’t say for sure. There’s a problem,” the mayor said. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Smog over New York, 1966: Around Thanksgiving, smog swept into the city, prompting a flurry of articles, dramatic front page pictures and emergency alerts in several states. Though hospitals reported that no one was immediately injured by the smog, the long-term effects were cited as a concern, and Mayor John V. Lindsay — back in City Hall after a Bermuda vacation — discussed a plan to require buildings to dispose of garbage by means other than incinerators. Would rents increase as a result? “I can’t say for sure. There’s a problem,” the mayor said. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

March 8, 1961: In the years following the second World War, finding a home for the thousands of Liberty ships that survived the fighting — like these on the Hudson River — was a challenge for the Federal Maritime Board. Many were sold, many were decommissioned and scrapped; some became floating docks, another, a floating nuclear station. Photo: The New York Times
March 8, 1961: In the years following the second World War, finding a home for the thousands of Liberty ships that survived the fighting — like these on the Hudson River — was a challenge for the Federal Maritime Board. Many were sold, many were decommissioned and scrapped; some became floating docks, another, a floating nuclear station. Photo: The New York Times

March 8, 1961: In the years following the second World War, finding a home for the thousands of Liberty ships that survived the fighting — like these on the Hudson River — was a challenge for the Federal Maritime Board. Many were sold, many were decommissioned and scrapped; some became floating docks, another, a floating nuclear station. Photo: The New York Times

July 19, 1954: One of the more boastful cruise ships to set sail since the Titanic, the superliner United States (“America’s largest, fastest and newest passenger liner”) had an appointment with its own special “beauty parlor” in Bayonne, N.J. “A spokesman for the line said this would be the third time in her two-year career that she would be looked over below the waterline,” The Times reported. “Work to be performed at Bayonne will include bottom scraping, painting and a check of her propellers.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times
July 19, 1954: One of the more boastful cruise ships to set sail since the Titanic, the superliner United States (“America’s largest, fastest and newest passenger liner”) had an appointment with its own special “beauty parlor” in Bayonne, N.J. “A spokesman for the line said this would be the third time in her two-year career that she would be looked over below the waterline,” The Times reported. “Work to be performed at Bayonne will include bottom scraping, painting and a check of her propellers.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

July 19, 1954: One of the more boastful cruise ships to set sail since the Titanic, the superliner United States (“America’s largest, fastest and newest passenger liner”) had an appointment with its own special “beauty parlor” in Bayonne, N.J. “A spokesman for the line said this would be the third time in her two-year career that she would be looked over below the waterline,” The Times reported. “Work to be performed at Bayonne will include bottom scraping, painting and a check of her propellers.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

Jan. 23, 1969: Boarding at Pier 86 at 46th Street in Manhattan, passengers walked the gangway to the superliner United States as a strike of longshoremen was hurting shipping-dependent industries. Truckers, for example, had had nothing to transport for 24 days. President Nixon was getting involved while American ocean liners’ departmental supervisors were reported to have taken over the work of their striking dockers, carting supplies onto boats. “I’m not hungry, just tired,” The Times quoted a pier supervisor as saying. “I only know that I have muscles I never dreamed of before.”   Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Jan. 23, 1969: Boarding at Pier 86 at 46th Street in Manhattan, passengers walked the gangway to the superliner United States as a strike of longshoremen was hurting shipping-dependent industries. Truckers, for example, had had nothing to transport for 24 days. President Nixon was getting involved while American ocean liners’ departmental supervisors were reported to have taken over the work of their striking dockers, carting supplies onto boats. “I’m not hungry, just tired,” The Times quoted a pier supervisor as saying. “I only know that I have muscles I never dreamed of before.”   Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Jan. 23, 1969: Boarding at Pier 86 at 46th Street in Manhattan, passengers walked the gangway to the superliner United States as a strike of longshoremen was hurting shipping-dependent industries. Truckers, for example, had had nothing to transport for 24 days. President Nixon was getting involved while American ocean liners’ departmental supervisors were reported to have taken over the work of their striking dockers, carting supplies onto boats. “I’m not hungry, just tired,” The Times quoted a pier supervisor as saying. “I only know that I have muscles I never dreamed of before.”   Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

April 4, 1956: Hugh Wiley, “the 29-year-old seagoing horseman on leave from the Navy” led his horse up a chartered plane at Idlewild, now Kennedy Airport, for Hamburg, where the Olympic riding team was en route for training before arriving in Stockholm. Though the 1956 Olympics were held in Melbourne, Australia, Australia’s fear of horse-borne diseases meant a six-month quarantine; the International Olympic Committee decided it was easier to host the horse events in Europe. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times
April 4, 1956: Hugh Wiley, “the 29-year-old seagoing horseman on leave from the Navy” led his horse up a chartered plane at Idlewild, now Kennedy Airport, for Hamburg, where the Olympic riding team was en route for training before arriving in Stockholm. Though the 1956 Olympics were held in Melbourne, Australia, Australia’s fear of horse-borne diseases meant a six-month quarantine; the International Olympic Committee decided it was easier to host the horse events in Europe. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

April 4, 1956: Hugh Wiley, “the 29-year-old seagoing horseman on leave from the Navy” led his horse up a chartered plane at Idlewild, now Kennedy Airport, for Hamburg, where the Olympic riding team was en route for training before arriving in Stockholm. Though the 1956 Olympics were held in Melbourne, Australia, Australia’s fear of horse-borne diseases meant a six-month quarantine; the International Olympic Committee decided it was easier to host the horse events in Europe. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

April 22, 1938: The original Seabiscuit, with his trainer Tom Smith, second from right, and his owner, Charles S. Howard, right, on his way to race War Admiral, a horse who, though a year younger than Seabiscuit, was both Seabiscuit’s uncle and chief rival. (Man o’ War was Seabiscuit’s grandfather and War Admiral’s father.) The match was eventually held in November, the only time they actually raced each other, and Seabiscuit, “the phlegmatic ugly duckling with the lame leg from the Pacific Coast” beat War Admiral with a record-breaking run. Photo: The New York Times
April 22, 1938: The original Seabiscuit, with his trainer Tom Smith, second from right, and his owner, Charles S. Howard, right, on his way to race War Admiral, a horse who, though a year younger than Seabiscuit, was both Seabiscuit’s uncle and chief rival. (Man o’ War was Seabiscuit’s grandfather and War Admiral’s father.) The match was eventually held in November, the only time they actually raced each other, and Seabiscuit, “the phlegmatic ugly duckling with the lame leg from the Pacific Coast” beat War Admiral with a record-breaking run. Photo: The New York Times

April 22, 1938: The original Seabiscuit, with his trainer Tom Smith, second from right, and his owner, Charles S. Howard, right, on his way to race War Admiral, a horse who, though a year younger than Seabiscuit, was both Seabiscuit’s uncle and chief rival. (Man o’ War was Seabiscuit’s grandfather and War Admiral’s father.) The match was eventually held in November, the only time they actually raced each other, and Seabiscuit, “the phlegmatic ugly duckling with the lame leg from the Pacific Coast” beat War Admiral with a record-breaking run. Photo: The New York Times

April 7, 1934: At the Aintree Racecourse near Liverpool, England, the Becher’s Brook fence is a formidable obstacle to any horse-jockey duo seeking glory at the Grand National (scenes from that competition are here, on Page 17). So formidable, in fact, that the fence terrifies the animals, who act erratically before the race, including the heavy-betting favorite of 2012, Synchronised, who died in that year’s Grand National. That death and later ones reignited debate and concern that the race’s dangers might “lead Parliament to ban it as it did, in time, with bearbaiting, dog-coursing and fox hunting.” Photo: The New York Times
April 7, 1934: At the Aintree Racecourse near Liverpool, England, the Becher’s Brook fence is a formidable obstacle to any horse-jockey duo seeking glory at the Grand National (scenes from that competition are here, on Page 17). So formidable, in fact, that the fence terrifies the animals, who act erratically before the race, including the heavy-betting favorite of 2012, Synchronised, who died in that year’s Grand National. That death and later ones reignited debate and concern that the race’s dangers might “lead Parliament to ban it as it did, in time, with bearbaiting, dog-coursing and fox hunting.” Photo: The New York Times

April 7, 1934: At the Aintree Racecourse near Liverpool, England, the Becher’s Brook fence is a formidable obstacle to any horse-jockey duo seeking glory at the Grand National (scenes from that competition are here, on Page 17). So formidable, in fact, that the fence terrifies the animals, who act erratically before the race, including the heavy-betting favorite of 2012, Synchronised, who died in that year’s Grand National. That death and later ones reignited debate and concern that the race’s dangers might “lead Parliament to ban it as it did, in time, with bearbaiting, dog-coursing and fox hunting.” Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 6, 1930: Wild horses, some “ready for the saddle,” 1,500 strong, were brought to Dublin Canyon, Calif., to be sold. A note on the picture’s back observes that “Will James could write several books on the different personalities of this group.” Mr. James was a popular author and illustrator of cowboy tales, including one about his own origins: that he was born “on a wagon in Montana or Wyoming,” orphaned, then raised by a French-Canadian trapper. (In fact, his given name was Joseph Ernest Nephtali Dufault and he was born in Saint-Nazaire-d’Acton, in Quebec.) Photo: The New York Times
Dec. 6, 1930: Wild horses, some “ready for the saddle,” 1,500 strong, were brought to Dublin Canyon, Calif., to be sold. A note on the picture’s back observes that “Will James could write several books on the different personalities of this group.” Mr. James was a popular author and illustrator of cowboy tales, including one about his own origins: that he was born “on a wagon in Montana or Wyoming,” orphaned, then raised by a French-Canadian trapper. (In fact, his given name was Joseph Ernest Nephtali Dufault and he was born in Saint-Nazaire-d’Acton, in Quebec.) Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 6, 1930: Wild horses, some “ready for the saddle,” 1,500 strong, were brought to Dublin Canyon, Calif., to be sold. A note on the picture’s back observes that “Will James could write several books on the different personalities of this group.” Mr. James was a popular author and illustrator of cowboy tales, including one about his own origins: that he was born “on a wagon in Montana or Wyoming,” orphaned, then raised by a French-Canadian trapper. (In fact, his given name was Joseph Ernest Nephtali Dufault and he was born in Saint-Nazaire-d’Acton, in Quebec.) Photo: The New York Times

Aug. 9, 1930: In Castellane, southern France, about a hundred miles from the Italian border, a herd of sheep sought ground suitable for grazing. Earlier that year, Premier Benito Mussolini of Italy made his own references to sheep in the area, The Times reported. “Down with France!” was the crowd’s chant during a speech in which the premier explained that he was rousing his people from stupefaction, “the bleatings of foreign wolves in sheep’s clothing.” Photo: The New York Times
Aug. 9, 1930: In Castellane, southern France, about a hundred miles from the Italian border, a herd of sheep sought ground suitable for grazing. Earlier that year, Premier Benito Mussolini of Italy made his own references to sheep in the area, The Times reported. “Down with France!” was the crowd’s chant during a speech in which the premier explained that he was rousing his people from stupefaction, “the bleatings of foreign wolves in sheep’s clothing.” Photo: The New York Times

Aug. 9, 1930: In Castellane, southern France, about a hundred miles from the Italian border, a herd of sheep sought ground suitable for grazing. Earlier that year, Premier Benito Mussolini of Italy made his own references to sheep in the area, The Times reported. “Down with France!” was the crowd’s chant during a speech in which the premier explained that he was rousing his people from stupefaction, “the bleatings of foreign wolves in sheep’s clothing.” Photo: The New York Times