The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1980s
April 7, 1983: For the 50th anniversary of the “King Kong” film, a 3,000-pound model was being hoisted onto the Empire State Building once again, but “with a blowout in an armpit” and other problems, the nylon replica ape was a laughingstock, or a disappointment, but not a terror, for millions of metropolitan area residents. Photo: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times
April 7, 1983: For the 50th anniversary of the “King Kong” film, a 3,000-pound model was being hoisted onto the Empire State Building once again, but “with a blowout in an armpit” and other problems, the nylon replica ape was a laughingstock, or a disappointment, but not a terror, for millions of metropolitan area residents. Photo: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

April 7, 1983: For the 50th anniversary of the “King Kong” film, a 3,000-pound model was being hoisted onto the Empire State Building once again, but “with a blowout in an armpit” and other problems, the nylon replica ape was a laughingstock, or a disappointment, but not a terror, for millions of metropolitan area residents. Photo: Sara Krulwich/The New York Times

Aug. 27, 1983: An article enumerated the attractions of the Flemington Fair in Flemington, N.J. There was Robert Hasselbrook, who brought his 18-month-old steer and admitted that his prize half-ton animal “will be somebody’s dinner.” There was Linda Hartman with her cat, Buttons, who was struggling to sell Belgian waffle sundaes since it was “too hot for the waffles.” There was “Flem Man,” who wore a cape and drove a Ford in a demolition derby, to his wife’s chagrin: “He’s crazy,” she said. “He thinks getting killed is fun.” And a National Guard tank demonstrated its car-smashing capabilities. Photo: Frank C. Dougherty
Aug. 27, 1983: An article enumerated the attractions of the Flemington Fair in Flemington, N.J. There was Robert Hasselbrook, who brought his 18-month-old steer and admitted that his prize half-ton animal “will be somebody’s dinner.” There was Linda Hartman with her cat, Buttons, who was struggling to sell Belgian waffle sundaes since it was “too hot for the waffles.” There was “Flem Man,” who wore a cape and drove a Ford in a demolition derby, to his wife’s chagrin: “He’s crazy,” she said. “He thinks getting killed is fun.” And a National Guard tank demonstrated its car-smashing capabilities. Photo: Frank C. Dougherty

Aug. 27, 1983: An article enumerated the attractions of the Flemington Fair in Flemington, N.J. There was Robert Hasselbrook, who brought his 18-month-old steer and admitted that his prize half-ton animal “will be somebody’s dinner.” There was Linda Hartman with her cat, Buttons, who was struggling to sell Belgian waffle sundaes since it was “too hot for the waffles.” There was “Flem Man,” who wore a cape and drove a Ford in a demolition derby, to his wife’s chagrin: “He’s crazy,” she said. “He thinks getting killed is fun.” And a National Guard tank demonstrated its car-smashing capabilities. Photo: Frank C. Dougherty

May 21, 1983: The photos shows a white Tuscan lamb coat in an Eskimo motif, but a fashion write-up of a Revillon show asked, “Would one have believed, in 1983, that a luxury furrier would revive rabbit?” Given rabbits’ recent track record in fashion, the answer was maybe, if those rabbits were French: “They’re nothing like those baby bunting numbers that appeared briefly around town in the 1970’s and shed themselves into oblivion. Revillon’s cottontails are French and said to be more tenacious about their fur.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times
May 21, 1983: The photos shows a white Tuscan lamb coat in an Eskimo motif, but a fashion write-up of a Revillon show asked, “Would one have believed, in 1983, that a luxury furrier would revive rabbit?” Given rabbits’ recent track record in fashion, the answer was maybe, if those rabbits were French: “They’re nothing like those baby bunting numbers that appeared briefly around town in the 1970’s and shed themselves into oblivion. Revillon’s cottontails are French and said to be more tenacious about their fur.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

May 21, 1983: The photos shows a white Tuscan lamb coat in an Eskimo motif, but a fashion write-up of a Revillon show asked, “Would one have believed, in 1983, that a luxury furrier would revive rabbit?” Given rabbits’ recent track record in fashion, the answer was maybe, if those rabbits were French: “They’re nothing like those baby bunting numbers that appeared briefly around town in the 1970’s and shed themselves into oblivion. Revillon’s cottontails are French and said to be more tenacious about their fur.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

Aug. 17, 1985: Like blips on a radar screen, children swung through the air under an overcast sky at an amusement park on Long Island, while “Shout” by Tears for Fears and “The Power of Love” by Huey Lewis and the News dominated the radio waves. To the north, on Baffin Island in Canada, the news wasn’t good: Christopher S. Wren reported that the Inuits there were not excited about plans for a new North American air defense system. Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times
Aug. 17, 1985: Like blips on a radar screen, children swung through the air under an overcast sky at an amusement park on Long Island, while “Shout” by Tears for Fears and “The Power of Love” by Huey Lewis and the News dominated the radio waves. To the north, on Baffin Island in Canada, the news wasn’t good: Christopher S. Wren reported that the Inuits there were not excited about plans for a new North American air defense system. Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

Aug. 17, 1985: Like blips on a radar screen, children swung through the air under an overcast sky at an amusement park on Long Island, while “Shout” by Tears for Fears and “The Power of Love” by Huey Lewis and the News dominated the radio waves. To the north, on Baffin Island in Canada, the news wasn’t good: Christopher S. Wren reported that the Inuits there were not excited about plans for a new North American air defense system. Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

April 27, 1984: The Lightning Loop at Great Adventure in Jackson Township, N.J., appeared above an article about attracting older crowds to amusement parks. Marketers hoped that by making the new parks “discreetly educational,” with better food or “designer merchandise,” that they might appeal to “an older, calmer, more sophisticated generation.” Food-wise, “the parks are experimenting with everything form pita bread sandwiches to lobster. … Older patrons, the rationale goes, are interested in a ‘dining experience’ rather than a quick snack.” Photo: Bob Glass/The New York Times
April 27, 1984: The Lightning Loop at Great Adventure in Jackson Township, N.J., appeared above an article about attracting older crowds to amusement parks. Marketers hoped that by making the new parks “discreetly educational,” with better food or “designer merchandise,” that they might appeal to “an older, calmer, more sophisticated generation.” Food-wise, “the parks are experimenting with everything form pita bread sandwiches to lobster. … Older patrons, the rationale goes, are interested in a ‘dining experience’ rather than a quick snack.” Photo: Bob Glass/The New York Times

April 27, 1984: The Lightning Loop at Great Adventure in Jackson Township, N.J., appeared above an article about attracting older crowds to amusement parks. Marketers hoped that by making the new parks “discreetly educational,” with better food or “designer merchandise,” that they might appeal to “an older, calmer, more sophisticated generation.” Food-wise, “the parks are experimenting with everything form pita bread sandwiches to lobster. … Older patrons, the rationale goes, are interested in a ‘dining experience’ rather than a quick snack.” Photo: Bob Glass/The New York Times

An end-of-year roundup recalled the 1982 defeat of Mayor Edward I. Koch by Mario M. Cuomo in the Democratic gubernatorial primary and other events, including the gathering of hundreds of thousands at Central Park’s Great Lawn in June to protest nuclear arms — “the biggest outpouring of political fervor since the 1960’s.” The rally’s cleanup, reported June 14, cost the Sanitation Department $100,000 in overtime to 500 workers. Photo: Keith Meyers/The New York Times
An end-of-year roundup recalled the 1982 defeat of Mayor Edward I. Koch by Mario M. Cuomo in the Democratic gubernatorial primary and other events, including the gathering of hundreds of thousands at Central Park’s Great Lawn in June to protest nuclear arms — “the biggest outpouring of political fervor since the 1960’s.” The rally’s cleanup, reported June 14, cost the Sanitation Department $100,000 in overtime to 500 workers. Photo: Keith Meyers/The New York Times

An end-of-year roundup recalled the 1982 defeat of Mayor Edward I. Koch by Mario M. Cuomo in the Democratic gubernatorial primary and other events, including the gathering of hundreds of thousands at Central Park’s Great Lawn in June to protest nuclear arms — “the biggest outpouring of political fervor since the 1960’s.” The rally’s cleanup, reported June 14, cost the Sanitation Department $100,000 in overtime to 500 workers. Photo: Keith Meyers/The New York Times