The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1970s
Jan. 21, 1975: Three inches of snow accumulated in parts of northern New Jersey, including Allendale, closing schools and hindering traffic of virtually every variety — plane, train, automobile — but not toboggan. In other news of the day, the front page reported that 10 hostages were released by terrorists at a Paris airport and that a police officer was shot to death in a Greenwich Village subway. Photo: Joyce Dopkeen/The New York Times
Jan. 21, 1975: Three inches of snow accumulated in parts of northern New Jersey, including Allendale, closing schools and hindering traffic of virtually every variety — plane, train, automobile — but not toboggan. In other news of the day, the front page reported that 10 hostages were released by terrorists at a Paris airport and that a police officer was shot to death in a Greenwich Village subway. Photo: Joyce Dopkeen/The New York Times

Jan. 21, 1975: Three inches of snow accumulated in parts of northern New Jersey, including Allendale, closing schools and hindering traffic of virtually every variety — plane, train, automobile — but not toboggan. In other news of the day, the front page reported that 10 hostages were released by terrorists at a Paris airport and that a police officer was shot to death in a Greenwich Village subway. Photo: Joyce Dopkeen/The New York Times

Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times
Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times

An eerie vision from October 1970, when the World Trade Center became the world’s tallest building. A 38-foot wall was added to the top of the 100th floor, making the tower four feet higher than the next tallest structure, the Empire State Building, before it reached its full height that December of 1,370 feet. But, it almost goes without saying, from our contemporary vantage, these beams being put into place summon the iconic image of the ground floor structure standing after the towers had collapsed around it, 31 years later. Photo: William Sauro/The New York Times
An eerie vision from October 1970, when the World Trade Center became the world’s tallest building. A 38-foot wall was added to the top of the 100th floor, making the tower four feet higher than the next tallest structure, the Empire State Building, before it reached its full height that December of 1,370 feet. But, it almost goes without saying, from our contemporary vantage, these beams being put into place summon the iconic image of the ground floor structure standing after the towers had collapsed around it, 31 years later. Photo: William Sauro/The New York Times

An eerie vision from October 1970, when the World Trade Center became the world’s tallest building. A 38-foot wall was added to the top of the 100th floor, making the tower four feet higher than the next tallest structure, the Empire State Building, before it reached its full height that December of 1,370 feet. But, it almost goes without saying, from our contemporary vantage, these beams being put into place summon the iconic image of the ground floor structure standing after the towers had collapsed around it, 31 years later. Photo: William Sauro/The New York Times

A bold statement between two towering obelisks: A spherical sculpture by Fritz Koenig flouted the hegemony of the straight line, provocatively declaring itself between the World Trade Center buildings. It was one of several abstract outdoor sculptures that made a stand in the mid-’70s. “Among the confusion and hustle of the city, they make a statement,” The Times quoted Doris Freedman, former head of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs. “They assert an individual presence, they humanize the impersonality of the city,” she said. Photo: Jack Manning/The New York Times
A bold statement between two towering obelisks: A spherical sculpture by Fritz Koenig flouted the hegemony of the straight line, provocatively declaring itself between the World Trade Center buildings. It was one of several abstract outdoor sculptures that made a stand in the mid-’70s. “Among the confusion and hustle of the city, they make a statement,” The Times quoted Doris Freedman, former head of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs. “They assert an individual presence, they humanize the impersonality of the city,” she said. Photo: Jack Manning/The New York Times

A bold statement between two towering obelisks: A spherical sculpture by Fritz Koenig flouted the hegemony of the straight line, provocatively declaring itself between the World Trade Center buildings. It was one of several abstract outdoor sculptures that made a stand in the mid-’70s. “Among the confusion and hustle of the city, they make a statement,” The Times quoted Doris Freedman, former head of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs. “They assert an individual presence, they humanize the impersonality of the city,” she said. Photo: Jack Manning/The New York Times

Jan. 23, 1975: A program to calm tensions in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn involved block-by-block visits to residents’ homes by police officers for “a few minutes of friendly talk.” The project seemed to bode well for the neighborhood, which roiled with racial tension: “Most of the policemen are white,” The Times reported, “and most of the residents black and they say the visits have brought some startling revelations. ‘You find out these people are the same as other people,’ said Detective Joseph Cunningham.” Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times
Jan. 23, 1975: A program to calm tensions in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn involved block-by-block visits to residents’ homes by police officers for “a few minutes of friendly talk.” The project seemed to bode well for the neighborhood, which roiled with racial tension: “Most of the policemen are white,” The Times reported, “and most of the residents black and they say the visits have brought some startling revelations. ‘You find out these people are the same as other people,’ said Detective Joseph Cunningham.” Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

Jan. 23, 1975: A program to calm tensions in the Bedford-Stuyvesant neighborhood of Brooklyn involved block-by-block visits to residents’ homes by police officers for “a few minutes of friendly talk.” The project seemed to bode well for the neighborhood, which roiled with racial tension: “Most of the policemen are white,” The Times reported, “and most of the residents black and they say the visits have brought some startling revelations. ‘You find out these people are the same as other people,’ said Detective Joseph Cunningham.” Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

March 24, 1973: Olga Korbut, who won three gold medals at the 1972 Munich Olympics, on the balance beam at Madison Square Garden several months before an article in The Times was published, reporting on Soviet takedowns of its own athletes, in print and elsewhere. “So striking has been the string of downfalls for the sports heroes of last year this season,” Hedrick Smith wrote for The Times, “that Westerners here have been wondering aloud whether Soviet authorities prefer that their athletes be reminded periodically they have feet of clay.” Photo: Larry Morris/The New York Times
March 24, 1973: Olga Korbut, who won three gold medals at the 1972 Munich Olympics, on the balance beam at Madison Square Garden several months before an article in The Times was published, reporting on Soviet takedowns of its own athletes, in print and elsewhere. “So striking has been the string of downfalls for the sports heroes of last year this season,” Hedrick Smith wrote for The Times, “that Westerners here have been wondering aloud whether Soviet authorities prefer that their athletes be reminded periodically they have feet of clay.” Photo: Larry Morris/The New York Times

March 24, 1973: Olga Korbut, who won three gold medals at the 1972 Munich Olympics, on the balance beam at Madison Square Garden several months before an article in The Times was published, reporting on Soviet takedowns of its own athletes, in print and elsewhere. “So striking has been the string of downfalls for the sports heroes of last year this season,” Hedrick Smith wrote for The Times, “that Westerners here have been wondering aloud whether Soviet authorities prefer that their athletes be reminded periodically they have feet of clay.” Photo: Larry Morris/The New York Times