The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1970s
May 10, 1972: Annie Catullo, puffing on a cigarette, inspected a fish’s freshness at a market where she intended to buy fish from a wholesaler for her upper Park Avenue store. The picture was evidently intended to accompany an article published in the paper of Aug. 13, 1974, that gave ample information about the frozen fish market and its bursting bubbles. “There has been a suggestion,” The Times reported with a soupçon of intrigue, “that the Canadian Government will buy and hold some of the Canadian wholesalers’ oversupply until prices rise again and then sell it back to the packers at the price it was bought.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times
May 10, 1972: Annie Catullo, puffing on a cigarette, inspected a fish’s freshness at a market where she intended to buy fish from a wholesaler for her upper Park Avenue store. The picture was evidently intended to accompany an article published in the paper of Aug. 13, 1974, that gave ample information about the frozen fish market and its bursting bubbles. “There has been a suggestion,” The Times reported with a soupçon of intrigue, “that the Canadian Government will buy and hold some of the Canadian wholesalers’ oversupply until prices rise again and then sell it back to the packers at the price it was bought.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

May 10, 1972: Annie Catullo, puffing on a cigarette, inspected a fish’s freshness at a market where she intended to buy fish from a wholesaler for her upper Park Avenue store. The picture was evidently intended to accompany an article published in the paper of Aug. 13, 1974, that gave ample information about the frozen fish market and its bursting bubbles. “There has been a suggestion,” The Times reported with a soupçon of intrigue, “that the Canadian Government will buy and hold some of the Canadian wholesalers’ oversupply until prices rise again and then sell it back to the packers at the price it was bought.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

Jan. 13, 1977: A four-alarm fire on Jones Street in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, part of, apparently, a phenomenon: “Fireman Victor Bengyak, a veteran member of Engine Company 24 in the West Village, recalled during the fire that Jones Street had had ‘an amazing number of major-alarm fires.’” As had the rest of the city: 19 companies from outer boroughs responded to seven multi-alarm fires in Manhattan that night, to cover the depleted forces addressing the Jones Street building. Photo: Paul Hosefros/The New York Times
Jan. 13, 1977: A four-alarm fire on Jones Street in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, part of, apparently, a phenomenon: “Fireman Victor Bengyak, a veteran member of Engine Company 24 in the West Village, recalled during the fire that Jones Street had had ‘an amazing number of major-alarm fires.’” As had the rest of the city: 19 companies from outer boroughs responded to seven multi-alarm fires in Manhattan that night, to cover the depleted forces addressing the Jones Street building. Photo: Paul Hosefros/The New York Times

Jan. 13, 1977: A four-alarm fire on Jones Street in Greenwich Village, Manhattan, part of, apparently, a phenomenon: “Fireman Victor Bengyak, a veteran member of Engine Company 24 in the West Village, recalled during the fire that Jones Street had had ‘an amazing number of major-alarm fires.’” As had the rest of the city: 19 companies from outer boroughs responded to seven multi-alarm fires in Manhattan that night, to cover the depleted forces addressing the Jones Street building. Photo: Paul Hosefros/The New York Times

Feb. 11, 1972: Snowmobile fever had infected the United States, and a flurry of articles in The Times enumerated the vehicle’s pleasures and perils. While The Times Magazine called it an “American Dream Machine,” another article described the boon the “ski-scooter” was for Thief River Falls, Minn., where winter was “no longer sitting indoors drinking beer, watching TV or playing pinochle,” Andrew H. Malcolm reported. Bundle up, he warned: “If you aren’t dressed properly, the wind chill factor at 30 miles an hour equals 70 degrees below zero. One recent snowmobiler froze an eyeball into uselessness.” Photo: Gary Settle/The New York Times
Feb. 11, 1972: Snowmobile fever had infected the United States, and a flurry of articles in The Times enumerated the vehicle’s pleasures and perils. While The Times Magazine called it an “American Dream Machine,” another article described the boon the “ski-scooter” was for Thief River Falls, Minn., where winter was “no longer sitting indoors drinking beer, watching TV or playing pinochle,” Andrew H. Malcolm reported. Bundle up, he warned: “If you aren’t dressed properly, the wind chill factor at 30 miles an hour equals 70 degrees below zero. One recent snowmobiler froze an eyeball into uselessness.” Photo: Gary Settle/The New York Times

Feb. 11, 1972: Snowmobile fever had infected the United States, and a flurry of articles in The Times enumerated the vehicle’s pleasures and perils. While The Times Magazine called it an “American Dream Machine,” another article described the boon the “ski-scooter” was for Thief River Falls, Minn., where winter was “no longer sitting indoors drinking beer, watching TV or playing pinochle,” Andrew H. Malcolm reported. Bundle up, he warned: “If you aren’t dressed properly, the wind chill factor at 30 miles an hour equals 70 degrees below zero. One recent snowmobiler froze an eyeball into uselessness.” Photo: Gary Settle/The New York Times

April 1, 1974: In Modesto, Calif., the cool kids gathered on a Friday night in a parking lot on McHenry Avenue. As is helpfully pointed out on the back, “This is the ‘in’ place for seeing who is out tonight, saying ‘hi’ to your friends and maybe finding a late date.” Photo: Teresa Zabala/The New York Times
April 1, 1974: In Modesto, Calif., the cool kids gathered on a Friday night in a parking lot on McHenry Avenue. As is helpfully pointed out on the back, “This is the ‘in’ place for seeing who is out tonight, saying ‘hi’ to your friends and maybe finding a late date.” Photo: Teresa Zabala/The New York Times

April 1, 1974: In Modesto, Calif., the cool kids gathered on a Friday night in a parking lot on McHenry Avenue. As is helpfully pointed out on the back, “This is the ‘in’ place for seeing who is out tonight, saying ‘hi’ to your friends and maybe finding a late date.” Photo: Teresa Zabala/The New York Times

July 28, 1978: A water main break in Bushwick, Brooklyn, rendered Decatur Street “a scene of contrasts.” A 48-inch pipe had burst at about 4:25 a.m., sending millions of gallons into the street, “shot up through the asphalt like a geyser.” Children played while residents fretted about the damage — and the delayed response. “Bushwick is a forgotten place,” The Times quoted Anne Norris, “but we are damn good taxpayers here.” Photo: Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times
July 28, 1978: A water main break in Bushwick, Brooklyn, rendered Decatur Street “a scene of contrasts.” A 48-inch pipe had burst at about 4:25 a.m., sending millions of gallons into the street, “shot up through the asphalt like a geyser.” Children played while residents fretted about the damage — and the delayed response. “Bushwick is a forgotten place,” The Times quoted Anne Norris, “but we are damn good taxpayers here.” Photo: Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times

July 28, 1978: A water main break in Bushwick, Brooklyn, rendered Decatur Street “a scene of contrasts.” A 48-inch pipe had burst at about 4:25 a.m., sending millions of gallons into the street, “shot up through the asphalt like a geyser.” Children played while residents fretted about the damage — and the delayed response. “Bushwick is a forgotten place,” The Times quoted Anne Norris, “but we are damn good taxpayers here.” Photo: Fred R. Conrad/The New York Times

Vito Surico, service manager of an American Motors dealership, explained what lurks beneath the hood of a Gremlin to a group of Long Island women. A Dec. 12, 1970, article, which ran without this photo, described, only slightly condescendingly, a two-hour seminar intended to “translate technical information into nontechnical terms,” and how to solve certain kinds of technical difficulties. Emma J. Cook of Freeport explained why she was present. “My present method of handling emergencies is to get out and kick the car,” she said, “and if nothing happens I look around for help.” Photo: Donal F. Holway/The New York Times
Vito Surico, service manager of an American Motors dealership, explained what lurks beneath the hood of a Gremlin to a group of Long Island women. A Dec. 12, 1970, article, which ran without this photo, described, only slightly condescendingly, a two-hour seminar intended to “translate technical information into nontechnical terms,” and how to solve certain kinds of technical difficulties. Emma J. Cook of Freeport explained why she was present. “My present method of handling emergencies is to get out and kick the car,” she said, “and if nothing happens I look around for help.” Photo: Donal F. Holway/The New York Times

Vito Surico, service manager of an American Motors dealership, explained what lurks beneath the hood of a Gremlin to a group of Long Island women. A Dec. 12, 1970, article, which ran without this photo, described, only slightly condescendingly, a two-hour seminar intended to “translate technical information into nontechnical terms,” and how to solve certain kinds of technical difficulties. Emma J. Cook of Freeport explained why she was present. “My present method of handling emergencies is to get out and kick the car,” she said, “and if nothing happens I look around for help.” Photo: Donal F. Holway/The New York Times

Though it wouldn’t look it, this weeklong Nassau County sailing course was a success, reported The Times on July 30, 1975. Courses in Hempstead Harbor on Long Island showed students, open to anyone above age 14 but intended mostly for young adults and senior citizens, taught the basics of sailing. Sidney Mischon, 58, there with his wife, Mimi, for a “refresher course,” said: “Now we’re so enthusiastic that I’m afraid we’ve become bores. Mimi took her practice rope to a party last weekend and started tying knots.” Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times
Though it wouldn’t look it, this weeklong Nassau County sailing course was a success, reported The Times on July 30, 1975. Courses in Hempstead Harbor on Long Island showed students, open to anyone above age 14 but intended mostly for young adults and senior citizens, taught the basics of sailing. Sidney Mischon, 58, there with his wife, Mimi, for a “refresher course,” said: “Now we’re so enthusiastic that I’m afraid we’ve become bores. Mimi took her practice rope to a party last weekend and started tying knots.” Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

Though it wouldn’t look it, this weeklong Nassau County sailing course was a success, reported The Times on July 30, 1975. Courses in Hempstead Harbor on Long Island showed students, open to anyone above age 14 but intended mostly for young adults and senior citizens, taught the basics of sailing. Sidney Mischon, 58, there with his wife, Mimi, for a “refresher course,” said: “Now we’re so enthusiastic that I’m afraid we’ve become bores. Mimi took her practice rope to a party last weekend and started tying knots.” Photo: Barton Silverman/The New York Times

Three brothers taking home a holiday tree through a rubble-strewn lot in the Bronx. Even 40 years ago, New York’s was a tale of two cities, according to Deirdre Carmody in a Dec. 22 article from 1973 headlined, “Christmas in the City Intensifies the Happiness — and Sadness.” She took the pulse of New York with stories — some happy, like a restaurant owner whose establishment was brought to life by carolers; others sad, like that of a retiring police commissioner or of an inert man slumped over on 42nd Street, left with a stack of coins by a compassionate young passer-by. Photo: William E. Sauro/The New York Times
Three brothers taking home a holiday tree through a rubble-strewn lot in the Bronx. Even 40 years ago, New York’s was a tale of two cities, according to Deirdre Carmody in a Dec. 22 article from 1973 headlined, “Christmas in the City Intensifies the Happiness — and Sadness.” She took the pulse of New York with stories — some happy, like a restaurant owner whose establishment was brought to life by carolers; others sad, like that of a retiring police commissioner or of an inert man slumped over on 42nd Street, left with a stack of coins by a compassionate young passer-by. Photo: William E. Sauro/The New York Times

Three brothers taking home a holiday tree through a rubble-strewn lot in the Bronx. Even 40 years ago, New York’s was a tale of two cities, according to Deirdre Carmody in a Dec. 22 article from 1973 headlined, “Christmas in the City Intensifies the Happiness — and Sadness.” She took the pulse of New York with stories — some happy, like a restaurant owner whose establishment was brought to life by carolers; others sad, like that of a retiring police commissioner or of an inert man slumped over on 42nd Street, left with a stack of coins by a compassionate young passer-by. Photo: William E. Sauro/The New York Times