The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1970s
Sept. 2, 1971: Fans reached for a foul ball hit by Horace Clarke of the Yankees in the first inning of a 2-0 loss to the Washington Senators, who maintained a “strange dominance over the Yankees,” who managed only four hits. Not three weeks later, the Senators were given approval to move to Texas to become the Rangers. Senators fans were so angry that some stormed the field during the team’s last game in Washington, another against the Yankees, and someone made off with first base. The umpire called a forfeit in favor of the Yankees. Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times
Sept. 2, 1971: Fans reached for a foul ball hit by Horace Clarke of the Yankees in the first inning of a 2-0 loss to the Washington Senators, who maintained a “strange dominance over the Yankees,” who managed only four hits. Not three weeks later, the Senators were given approval to move to Texas to become the Rangers. Senators fans were so angry that some stormed the field during the team’s last game in Washington, another against the Yankees, and someone made off with first base. The umpire called a forfeit in favor of the Yankees. Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

Sept. 2, 1971: Fans reached for a foul ball hit by Horace Clarke of the Yankees in the first inning of a 2-0 loss to the Washington Senators, who maintained a “strange dominance over the Yankees,” who managed only four hits. Not three weeks later, the Senators were given approval to move to Texas to become the Rangers. Senators fans were so angry that some stormed the field during the team’s last game in Washington, another against the Yankees, and someone made off with first base. The umpire called a forfeit in favor of the Yankees. Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

May 15, 1977: An article in The Times Magazine presented President Jimmy Carter, early in his single term, as a “Maestro of the Media,” explaining his success on the screen. “These are the glory days,” reported Richard Reeves, “and the man can seem to do no electronic wrong.” To the left of the president’s ear, Barry Jagoda gave some last-minute advice. Photo: Theresa Zabala/The New York Times
May 15, 1977: An article in The Times Magazine presented President Jimmy Carter, early in his single term, as a “Maestro of the Media,” explaining his success on the screen. “These are the glory days,” reported Richard Reeves, “and the man can seem to do no electronic wrong.” To the left of the president’s ear, Barry Jagoda gave some last-minute advice. Photo: Theresa Zabala/The New York Times

May 15, 1977: An article in The Times Magazine presented President Jimmy Carter, early in his single term, as a “Maestro of the Media,” explaining his success on the screen. “These are the glory days,” reported Richard Reeves, “and the man can seem to do no electronic wrong.” To the left of the president’s ear, Barry Jagoda gave some last-minute advice. Photo: Theresa Zabala/The New York Times

Jan. 21, 1975: Three inches of snow accumulated in parts of northern New Jersey, including Allendale, closing schools and hindering traffic of virtually every variety — plane, train, automobile — but not toboggan. In other news of the day, the front page reported that 10 hostages were released by terrorists at a Paris airport and that a police officer was shot to death in a Greenwich Village subway. Photo: Joyce Dopkeen/The New York Times
Jan. 21, 1975: Three inches of snow accumulated in parts of northern New Jersey, including Allendale, closing schools and hindering traffic of virtually every variety — plane, train, automobile — but not toboggan. In other news of the day, the front page reported that 10 hostages were released by terrorists at a Paris airport and that a police officer was shot to death in a Greenwich Village subway. Photo: Joyce Dopkeen/The New York Times

Jan. 21, 1975: Three inches of snow accumulated in parts of northern New Jersey, including Allendale, closing schools and hindering traffic of virtually every variety — plane, train, automobile — but not toboggan. In other news of the day, the front page reported that 10 hostages were released by terrorists at a Paris airport and that a police officer was shot to death in a Greenwich Village subway. Photo: Joyce Dopkeen/The New York Times

Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times
Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times

An eerie vision from October 1970, when the World Trade Center became the world’s tallest building. A 38-foot wall was added to the top of the 100th floor, making the tower four feet higher than the next tallest structure, the Empire State Building, before it reached its full height that December of 1,370 feet. But, it almost goes without saying, from our contemporary vantage, these beams being put into place summon the iconic image of the ground floor structure standing after the towers had collapsed around it, 31 years later. Photo: William Sauro/The New York Times
An eerie vision from October 1970, when the World Trade Center became the world’s tallest building. A 38-foot wall was added to the top of the 100th floor, making the tower four feet higher than the next tallest structure, the Empire State Building, before it reached its full height that December of 1,370 feet. But, it almost goes without saying, from our contemporary vantage, these beams being put into place summon the iconic image of the ground floor structure standing after the towers had collapsed around it, 31 years later. Photo: William Sauro/The New York Times

An eerie vision from October 1970, when the World Trade Center became the world’s tallest building. A 38-foot wall was added to the top of the 100th floor, making the tower four feet higher than the next tallest structure, the Empire State Building, before it reached its full height that December of 1,370 feet. But, it almost goes without saying, from our contemporary vantage, these beams being put into place summon the iconic image of the ground floor structure standing after the towers had collapsed around it, 31 years later. Photo: William Sauro/The New York Times

A bold statement between two towering obelisks: A spherical sculpture by Fritz Koenig flouted the hegemony of the straight line, provocatively declaring itself between the World Trade Center buildings. It was one of several abstract outdoor sculptures that made a stand in the mid-’70s. “Among the confusion and hustle of the city, they make a statement,” The Times quoted Doris Freedman, former head of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs. “They assert an individual presence, they humanize the impersonality of the city,” she said. Photo: Jack Manning/The New York Times
A bold statement between two towering obelisks: A spherical sculpture by Fritz Koenig flouted the hegemony of the straight line, provocatively declaring itself between the World Trade Center buildings. It was one of several abstract outdoor sculptures that made a stand in the mid-’70s. “Among the confusion and hustle of the city, they make a statement,” The Times quoted Doris Freedman, former head of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs. “They assert an individual presence, they humanize the impersonality of the city,” she said. Photo: Jack Manning/The New York Times

A bold statement between two towering obelisks: A spherical sculpture by Fritz Koenig flouted the hegemony of the straight line, provocatively declaring itself between the World Trade Center buildings. It was one of several abstract outdoor sculptures that made a stand in the mid-’70s. “Among the confusion and hustle of the city, they make a statement,” The Times quoted Doris Freedman, former head of the city’s Department of Cultural Affairs. “They assert an individual presence, they humanize the impersonality of the city,” she said. Photo: Jack Manning/The New York Times