The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1960s
May 24, 1960: Sam Falk of The New York Times sought the perfect shot of an aquarium shark in a year when a Jersey Shore shark attack frightened the Metro area. The Times sought to set the record straight on Aug. 28: “Scientists point out there is less chance of a swimmer being attacked by a shark than struck by lightning.” And experts surmised that “there is no real increase, but merely more swimmers and sun bathers to report sighting of sharks” as well as “other large fish, which are often mistaken for sharks.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
May 24, 1960: Sam Falk of The New York Times sought the perfect shot of an aquarium shark in a year when a Jersey Shore shark attack frightened the Metro area. The Times sought to set the record straight on Aug. 28: “Scientists point out there is less chance of a swimmer being attacked by a shark than struck by lightning.” And experts surmised that “there is no real increase, but merely more swimmers and sun bathers to report sighting of sharks” as well as “other large fish, which are often mistaken for sharks.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

May 24, 1960: Sam Falk of The New York Times sought the perfect shot of an aquarium shark in a year when a Jersey Shore shark attack frightened the Metro area. The Times sought to set the record straight on Aug. 28: “Scientists point out there is less chance of a swimmer being attacked by a shark than struck by lightning.” And experts surmised that “there is no real increase, but merely more swimmers and sun bathers to report sighting of sharks” as well as “other large fish, which are often mistaken for sharks.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

April 30, 1961: As part of the “American Assault on Space,” astronauts were ordered to spend up to 24 hours underwater to simulate weightlessness and “problems of dexterity.” There was also the hope to gain traction in the space race with the Soviet Union. However, not, apparently, to gain traction in the Cold War chess race — they decided on checkers. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
April 30, 1961: As part of the “American Assault on Space,” astronauts were ordered to spend up to 24 hours underwater to simulate weightlessness and “problems of dexterity.” There was also the hope to gain traction in the space race with the Soviet Union. However, not, apparently, to gain traction in the Cold War chess race — they decided on checkers. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

April 30, 1961: As part of the “American Assault on Space,” astronauts were ordered to spend up to 24 hours underwater to simulate weightlessness and “problems of dexterity.” There was also the hope to gain traction in the space race with the Soviet Union. However, not, apparently, to gain traction in the Cold War chess race — they decided on checkers. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

Sept. 12, 1960: Flooding on West and Cortlandt Streets, brought by Hurricane Donna, which laid waste to Florida and on up the East Coast. The storm killed dozens in Florida and Puerto Rico and elsewhere. Indeed, according to the National Hurricane Center, it was the United States’ 10th costliest hurricane — adjusted for inflation, population and wealth normalization. The intersection at West and Cortlandt Streets was razed a few years later to make way for the World Trade Center. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times
Sept. 12, 1960: Flooding on West and Cortlandt Streets, brought by Hurricane Donna, which laid waste to Florida and on up the East Coast. The storm killed dozens in Florida and Puerto Rico and elsewhere. Indeed, according to the National Hurricane Center, it was the United States’ 10th costliest hurricane — adjusted for inflation, population and wealth normalization. The intersection at West and Cortlandt Streets was razed a few years later to make way for the World Trade Center. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

Sept. 12, 1960: Flooding on West and Cortlandt Streets, brought by Hurricane Donna, which laid waste to Florida and on up the East Coast. The storm killed dozens in Florida and Puerto Rico and elsewhere. Indeed, according to the National Hurricane Center, it was the United States’ 10th costliest hurricane — adjusted for inflation, population and wealth normalization. The intersection at West and Cortlandt Streets was razed a few years later to make way for the World Trade Center. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

July 1, 1960: Happy campers’ eyes were dry on a day of exodus as 7,000 children from the city boarded trains at Grand Central Terminal to be whisked to various summer camps. “By next Thursday,” The Times reported, “about 35,000 will have passed through the terminal and Pennsylvania Station. Other thousands will depart by bus.” Some children, however, stayed behind, and got soaked, as these children did in the Bronx, playing in front of a fire hydrant opened by the Police Athletic League. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times
July 1, 1960: Happy campers’ eyes were dry on a day of exodus as 7,000 children from the city boarded trains at Grand Central Terminal to be whisked to various summer camps. “By next Thursday,” The Times reported, “about 35,000 will have passed through the terminal and Pennsylvania Station. Other thousands will depart by bus.” Some children, however, stayed behind, and got soaked, as these children did in the Bronx, playing in front of a fire hydrant opened by the Police Athletic League. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

July 1, 1960: Happy campers’ eyes were dry on a day of exodus as 7,000 children from the city boarded trains at Grand Central Terminal to be whisked to various summer camps. “By next Thursday,” The Times reported, “about 35,000 will have passed through the terminal and Pennsylvania Station. Other thousands will depart by bus.” Some children, however, stayed behind, and got soaked, as these children did in the Bronx, playing in front of a fire hydrant opened by the Police Athletic League. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

Nov. 16, 1969: Just a few months after Dwight D. Eisenhower’s death, his premonitions of a military-industrial complex were being reported on in The Times magazine, in an article with a photograph in which a mechanic checked the intake blades of a C-5 Galaxy Transport, built by Lockheed in Marietta, Ga. “Since the U.S. is both underwriter and customer, … it should own the defense industry.” Photo: George Tames/The New York Times
Nov. 16, 1969: Just a few months after Dwight D. Eisenhower’s death, his premonitions of a military-industrial complex were being reported on in The Times magazine, in an article with a photograph in which a mechanic checked the intake blades of a C-5 Galaxy Transport, built by Lockheed in Marietta, Ga. “Since the U.S. is both underwriter and customer, … it should own the defense industry.” Photo: George Tames/The New York Times

Nov. 16, 1969: Just a few months after Dwight D. Eisenhower’s death, his premonitions of a military-industrial complex were being reported on in The Times magazine, in an article with a photograph in which a mechanic checked the intake blades of a C-5 Galaxy Transport, built by Lockheed in Marietta, Ga. “Since the U.S. is both underwriter and customer, … it should own the defense industry.” Photo: George Tames/The New York Times

Feb. 24, 1960: At the Art Model Studios in Mount Vernon, N.Y., where men would spend their days “‘just sittin’ around’ whittling — and get paid for it.” An article went on to describe a merry band of obsessive perfectionists who made model boats, mostly ocean liners, for ship companies and museums, spending hundreds of hours and using tools like tweezers to build “a precise fractional scale of the actual ship,” down to the “life preservers that would be tight on an ant.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times
Feb. 24, 1960: At the Art Model Studios in Mount Vernon, N.Y., where men would spend their days “‘just sittin’ around’ whittling — and get paid for it.” An article went on to describe a merry band of obsessive perfectionists who made model boats, mostly ocean liners, for ship companies and museums, spending hundreds of hours and using tools like tweezers to build “a precise fractional scale of the actual ship,” down to the “life preservers that would be tight on an ant.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

Feb. 24, 1960: At the Art Model Studios in Mount Vernon, N.Y., where men would spend their days “‘just sittin’ around’ whittling — and get paid for it.” An article went on to describe a merry band of obsessive perfectionists who made model boats, mostly ocean liners, for ship companies and museums, spending hundreds of hours and using tools like tweezers to build “a precise fractional scale of the actual ship,” down to the “life preservers that would be tight on an ant.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

Ski season in Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx opened on Dec. 11, 1964, the park’s slopes sprayed with fake snow and its benches’ fresh paint still drying. Arriving to the opening-day confusion at the ski area was Sacha Grill, shown here, a ski instructor who, apart from the fact that he carried skis, dressed more like a yacht club member than a skier. Perhaps that’s why the concession owner asked him, “Hi, who’re you with?” The Times reported that Mr. Grill “explained that he was one of the ski instructors.” The owner didn’t miss a beat. “Oh wow, we need them,” he replied. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Ski season in Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx opened on Dec. 11, 1964, the park’s slopes sprayed with fake snow and its benches’ fresh paint still drying. Arriving to the opening-day confusion at the ski area was Sacha Grill, shown here, a ski instructor who, apart from the fact that he carried skis, dressed more like a yacht club member than a skier. Perhaps that’s why the concession owner asked him, “Hi, who’re you with?” The Times reported that Mr. Grill “explained that he was one of the ski instructors.” The owner didn’t miss a beat. “Oh wow, we need them,” he replied. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Ski season in Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx opened on Dec. 11, 1964, the park’s slopes sprayed with fake snow and its benches’ fresh paint still drying. Arriving to the opening-day confusion at the ski area was Sacha Grill, shown here, a ski instructor who, apart from the fact that he carried skis, dressed more like a yacht club member than a skier. Perhaps that’s why the concession owner asked him, “Hi, who’re you with?” The Times reported that Mr. Grill “explained that he was one of the ski instructors.” The owner didn’t miss a beat. “Oh wow, we need them,” he replied. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Jan. 7, 1960: In Rockaway, Queens, snow blanketed the decrepitude at the Arverne Urban Renewal Area, which was slated to be entirely rebuilt by 1969. In 1966, it was still waiting on some sign of progress when a grand jury took a bus trip there to investigate the deteriorating section. Bungalows were razed in 1969, but nothing new was built, and in 1971 the city was parking low-income residents in trailers there while those residents, mostly blacks and Puerto Ricans, waited for more permanent housing. Not until the Bloomberg era did Arverne begin to show signs of new life. Photo: Patrick F. Burns/The New York Times
Jan. 7, 1960: In Rockaway, Queens, snow blanketed the decrepitude at the Arverne Urban Renewal Area, which was slated to be entirely rebuilt by 1969. In 1966, it was still waiting on some sign of progress when a grand jury took a bus trip there to investigate the deteriorating section. Bungalows were razed in 1969, but nothing new was built, and in 1971 the city was parking low-income residents in trailers there while those residents, mostly blacks and Puerto Ricans, waited for more permanent housing. Not until the Bloomberg era did Arverne begin to show signs of new life. Photo: Patrick F. Burns/The New York Times

Jan. 7, 1960: In Rockaway, Queens, snow blanketed the decrepitude at the Arverne Urban Renewal Area, which was slated to be entirely rebuilt by 1969. In 1966, it was still waiting on some sign of progress when a grand jury took a bus trip there to investigate the deteriorating section. Bungalows were razed in 1969, but nothing new was built, and in 1971 the city was parking low-income residents in trailers there while those residents, mostly blacks and Puerto Ricans, waited for more permanent housing. Not until the Bloomberg era did Arverne begin to show signs of new life. Photo: Patrick F. Burns/The New York Times

March 11, 1968: A tank was parked near the Throgs Neck Bridge, not leftover from a battle to determine which was the superior borough, Queens or the Bronx (they are joined by the bridge), but because it was apparently abandoned. It sat there for a weekend, to the amusement of the locals, like Olympia Johansen’s son Stanley. “He just got back from Vietnam in January,” Mrs. Johansen said.  “‘Hey Mom,’ he yelled to me, ‘They just delivered my tank.’ ” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times
March 11, 1968: A tank was parked near the Throgs Neck Bridge, not leftover from a battle to determine which was the superior borough, Queens or the Bronx (they are joined by the bridge), but because it was apparently abandoned. It sat there for a weekend, to the amusement of the locals, like Olympia Johansen’s son Stanley. “He just got back from Vietnam in January,” Mrs. Johansen said.  “‘Hey Mom,’ he yelled to me, ‘They just delivered my tank.’ ” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

March 11, 1968: A tank was parked near the Throgs Neck Bridge, not leftover from a battle to determine which was the superior borough, Queens or the Bronx (they are joined by the bridge), but because it was apparently abandoned. It sat there for a weekend, to the amusement of the locals, like Olympia Johansen’s son Stanley. “He just got back from Vietnam in January,” Mrs. Johansen said.  “‘Hey Mom,’ he yelled to me, ‘They just delivered my tank.’ ” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

“Education is our business,” averred Walter J. Sutcliffe, chief commander of the United States Power Squadrons, in the paper of Jan. 19, 1964. And so, William Stein gave a demonstration of the effects of wind on a sail, using an electric fan. “We want to help and serve the person who wants to make sure that what he is doing on the water with his boat is correct,” Mr. Sutcliffe wrote. Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times
“Education is our business,” averred Walter J. Sutcliffe, chief commander of the United States Power Squadrons, in the paper of Jan. 19, 1964. And so, William Stein gave a demonstration of the effects of wind on a sail, using an electric fan. “We want to help and serve the person who wants to make sure that what he is doing on the water with his boat is correct,” Mr. Sutcliffe wrote. Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times

“Education is our business,” averred Walter J. Sutcliffe, chief commander of the United States Power Squadrons, in the paper of Jan. 19, 1964. And so, William Stein gave a demonstration of the effects of wind on a sail, using an electric fan. “We want to help and serve the person who wants to make sure that what he is doing on the water with his boat is correct,” Mr. Sutcliffe wrote. Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times