The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1960s
May 3, 1968: “There were no sticks or pucks and the only ice around was in the drinks,” reported Enid Nemy in The Times, describing a specially invented version of hockey at the St. Regis Hotel, where the elite bounced a balloon around a ballroom at a benefit for the Girl Scouts. “It turned out to be a rather ephemeral version of basketball,” Ms. Nemy wrote. The game had a penalty box (another table), referees and rules, with teams even opting for the balloon over a beach ball for fear of breaking the chandeliers. Opposing players had gardening gloves to know whose side they were on, and the “mistress of ceremonies” said “kicking or dribbling was permitted but warned against biting, gouging or breaking balloons with fingernails.” “I’m glad I’m crippled and can’t play this game,” said one observer, who had hurt his wrist in an accident. Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times
May 3, 1968: “There were no sticks or pucks and the only ice around was in the drinks,” reported Enid Nemy in The Times, describing a specially invented version of hockey at the St. Regis Hotel, where the elite bounced a balloon around a ballroom at a benefit for the Girl Scouts. “It turned out to be a rather ephemeral version of basketball,” Ms. Nemy wrote. The game had a penalty box (another table), referees and rules, with teams even opting for the balloon over a beach ball for fear of breaking the chandeliers. Opposing players had gardening gloves to know whose side they were on, and the “mistress of ceremonies” said “kicking or dribbling was permitted but warned against biting, gouging or breaking balloons with fingernails.” “I’m glad I’m crippled and can’t play this game,” said one observer, who had hurt his wrist in an accident. Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times

May 3, 1968: “There were no sticks or pucks and the only ice around was in the drinks,” reported Enid Nemy in The Times, describing a specially invented version of hockey at the St. Regis Hotel, where the elite bounced a balloon around a ballroom at a benefit for the Girl Scouts. “It turned out to be a rather ephemeral version of basketball,” Ms. Nemy wrote. The game had a penalty box (another table), referees and rules, with teams even opting for the balloon over a beach ball for fear of breaking the chandeliers. Opposing players had gardening gloves to know whose side they were on, and the “mistress of ceremonies” said “kicking or dribbling was permitted but warned against biting, gouging or breaking balloons with fingernails.” “I’m glad I’m crippled and can’t play this game,” said one observer, who had hurt his wrist in an accident. Photo: Larry C. Morris/The New York Times

July 10, 1960: In Southern California, delegates descended on the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena to nominate the Democratic candidate for president; John F. Kennedy won on the first ballot, almost doubling the votes that went to Lyndon B. Johnson. This photo adorned The Times Magazine cover, which provided a sort of guide to the convention’s goings-on, the “big powwow.” Photo: The New York Times
July 10, 1960: In Southern California, delegates descended on the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena to nominate the Democratic candidate for president; John F. Kennedy won on the first ballot, almost doubling the votes that went to Lyndon B. Johnson. This photo adorned The Times Magazine cover, which provided a sort of guide to the convention’s goings-on, the “big powwow.” Photo: The New York Times

July 10, 1960: In Southern California, delegates descended on the Los Angeles Memorial Sports Arena to nominate the Democratic candidate for president; John F. Kennedy won on the first ballot, almost doubling the votes that went to Lyndon B. Johnson. This photo adorned The Times Magazine cover, which provided a sort of guide to the convention’s goings-on, the “big powwow.” Photo: The New York Times

While the Cuban missile crisis threatened nuclear Armageddon, Stephen I. Horn, of the Jonas Brothers Studios taxidermy, was lamenting that most folks don’t realize what it takes to make a decorative fur rug. “They think taxidermy is just stuffing animals,” he was quoted as saying in the paper of Oct. 25, 1962. “It’s much more than that.” The article elaborates, showing how to make a head: “A papier-mâché form is molded. This is covered with soft putty. Glass eyes are set into the wet putty and the skin is carefully fitted over it. The head takes two or three days to dry completely.” Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times
While the Cuban missile crisis threatened nuclear Armageddon, Stephen I. Horn, of the Jonas Brothers Studios taxidermy, was lamenting that most folks don’t realize what it takes to make a decorative fur rug. “They think taxidermy is just stuffing animals,” he was quoted as saying in the paper of Oct. 25, 1962. “It’s much more than that.” The article elaborates, showing how to make a head: “A papier-mâché form is molded. This is covered with soft putty. Glass eyes are set into the wet putty and the skin is carefully fitted over it. The head takes two or three days to dry completely.” Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times

While the Cuban missile crisis threatened nuclear Armageddon, Stephen I. Horn, of the Jonas Brothers Studios taxidermy, was lamenting that most folks don’t realize what it takes to make a decorative fur rug. “They think taxidermy is just stuffing animals,” he was quoted as saying in the paper of Oct. 25, 1962. “It’s much more than that.” The article elaborates, showing how to make a head: “A papier-mâché form is molded. This is covered with soft putty. Glass eyes are set into the wet putty and the skin is carefully fitted over it. The head takes two or three days to dry completely.” Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times

Smog over New York, 1966: Around Thanksgiving, smog swept into the city, prompting a flurry of articles, dramatic front page pictures and emergency alerts in several states. Though hospitals reported that no one was immediately injured by the smog, the long-term effects were cited as a concern, and Mayor John V. Lindsay — back in City Hall after a Bermuda vacation — discussed a plan to require buildings to dispose of garbage by means other than incinerators. Would rents increase as a result? “I can’t say for sure. There’s a problem,” the mayor said. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Smog over New York, 1966: Around Thanksgiving, smog swept into the city, prompting a flurry of articles, dramatic front page pictures and emergency alerts in several states. Though hospitals reported that no one was immediately injured by the smog, the long-term effects were cited as a concern, and Mayor John V. Lindsay — back in City Hall after a Bermuda vacation — discussed a plan to require buildings to dispose of garbage by means other than incinerators. Would rents increase as a result? “I can’t say for sure. There’s a problem,” the mayor said. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Smog over New York, 1966: Around Thanksgiving, smog swept into the city, prompting a flurry of articles, dramatic front page pictures and emergency alerts in several states. Though hospitals reported that no one was immediately injured by the smog, the long-term effects were cited as a concern, and Mayor John V. Lindsay — back in City Hall after a Bermuda vacation — discussed a plan to require buildings to dispose of garbage by means other than incinerators. Would rents increase as a result? “I can’t say for sure. There’s a problem,” the mayor said. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

March 8, 1961: In the years following the second World War, finding a home for the thousands of Liberty ships that survived the fighting — like these on the Hudson River — was a challenge for the Federal Maritime Board. Many were sold, many were decommissioned and scrapped; some became floating docks, another, a floating nuclear station. Photo: The New York Times
March 8, 1961: In the years following the second World War, finding a home for the thousands of Liberty ships that survived the fighting — like these on the Hudson River — was a challenge for the Federal Maritime Board. Many were sold, many were decommissioned and scrapped; some became floating docks, another, a floating nuclear station. Photo: The New York Times

March 8, 1961: In the years following the second World War, finding a home for the thousands of Liberty ships that survived the fighting — like these on the Hudson River — was a challenge for the Federal Maritime Board. Many were sold, many were decommissioned and scrapped; some became floating docks, another, a floating nuclear station. Photo: The New York Times

Jan. 23, 1969: Boarding at Pier 86 at 46th Street in Manhattan, passengers walked the gangway to the superliner United States as a strike of longshoremen was hurting shipping-dependent industries. Truckers, for example, had had nothing to transport for 24 days. President Nixon was getting involved while American ocean liners’ departmental supervisors were reported to have taken over the work of their striking dockers, carting supplies onto boats. “I’m not hungry, just tired,” The Times quoted a pier supervisor as saying. “I only know that I have muscles I never dreamed of before.”   Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Jan. 23, 1969: Boarding at Pier 86 at 46th Street in Manhattan, passengers walked the gangway to the superliner United States as a strike of longshoremen was hurting shipping-dependent industries. Truckers, for example, had had nothing to transport for 24 days. President Nixon was getting involved while American ocean liners’ departmental supervisors were reported to have taken over the work of their striking dockers, carting supplies onto boats. “I’m not hungry, just tired,” The Times quoted a pier supervisor as saying. “I only know that I have muscles I never dreamed of before.”   Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Jan. 23, 1969: Boarding at Pier 86 at 46th Street in Manhattan, passengers walked the gangway to the superliner United States as a strike of longshoremen was hurting shipping-dependent industries. Truckers, for example, had had nothing to transport for 24 days. President Nixon was getting involved while American ocean liners’ departmental supervisors were reported to have taken over the work of their striking dockers, carting supplies onto boats. “I’m not hungry, just tired,” The Times quoted a pier supervisor as saying. “I only know that I have muscles I never dreamed of before.”   Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Feb. 12, 1965: Flights were canceled at Kennedy Airport because of heavy fog on Lincoln’s Birthday. While this DC-7B sat on the tarmac, a member of the ground crew searched for a Miami-bound airplane that was retreating on the runway. The ground crew member, the caption reported, could hear the other plane but not see it. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times
Feb. 12, 1965: Flights were canceled at Kennedy Airport because of heavy fog on Lincoln’s Birthday. While this DC-7B sat on the tarmac, a member of the ground crew searched for a Miami-bound airplane that was retreating on the runway. The ground crew member, the caption reported, could hear the other plane but not see it. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

Feb. 12, 1965: Flights were canceled at Kennedy Airport because of heavy fog on Lincoln’s Birthday. While this DC-7B sat on the tarmac, a member of the ground crew searched for a Miami-bound airplane that was retreating on the runway. The ground crew member, the caption reported, could hear the other plane but not see it. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

A plainclothes police officer kept watch over rooftops in the Highbridge neighborhood of the Bronx on Nov. 25, 1969, in part of the coverage for a Dec. 24 article that reported on a special Police Department crime analysis, hoping to stem robberies. Though the report said that the victims were likely to be older and white, and that 80 percent of the “robbers, according to descriptions supplied by the victims, were Negroes or Puerto Ricans,” The Times quoted Capt. Salvatore Matteis, the 44th Precinct commander, as saying “This isn’t a matter of race; it’s a matter of economics.” Photo: Michael Evans/The New York Times
A plainclothes police officer kept watch over rooftops in the Highbridge neighborhood of the Bronx on Nov. 25, 1969, in part of the coverage for a Dec. 24 article that reported on a special Police Department crime analysis, hoping to stem robberies. Though the report said that the victims were likely to be older and white, and that 80 percent of the “robbers, according to descriptions supplied by the victims, were Negroes or Puerto Ricans,” The Times quoted Capt. Salvatore Matteis, the 44th Precinct commander, as saying “This isn’t a matter of race; it’s a matter of economics.” Photo: Michael Evans/The New York Times

A plainclothes police officer kept watch over rooftops in the Highbridge neighborhood of the Bronx on Nov. 25, 1969, in part of the coverage for a Dec. 24 article that reported on a special Police Department crime analysis, hoping to stem robberies. Though the report said that the victims were likely to be older and white, and that 80 percent of the “robbers, according to descriptions supplied by the victims, were Negroes or Puerto Ricans,” The Times quoted Capt. Salvatore Matteis, the 44th Precinct commander, as saying “This isn’t a matter of race; it’s a matter of economics.” Photo: Michael Evans/The New York Times

Jan. 14, 1963: Paddy Chayefsky’s play, “The Passion of Josef D.,” put on at the New Amsterdam Theater, required the transforming of actors like Peter Falk, pictured, into Joseph Stalins and Leon Trotskys. According to Luther Adler, who played Vladimir Lenin, “In this show we have 22 wigs, 24 mustaches, 10 goatees and 4 beards for a cast in which 35 actors will play more than 100 roles.” Photo: The New York Times
Jan. 14, 1963: Paddy Chayefsky’s play, “The Passion of Josef D.,” put on at the New Amsterdam Theater, required the transforming of actors like Peter Falk, pictured, into Joseph Stalins and Leon Trotskys. According to Luther Adler, who played Vladimir Lenin, “In this show we have 22 wigs, 24 mustaches, 10 goatees and 4 beards for a cast in which 35 actors will play more than 100 roles.” Photo: The New York Times

Jan. 14, 1963: Paddy Chayefsky’s play, “The Passion of Josef D.,” put on at the New Amsterdam Theater, required the transforming of actors like Peter Falk, pictured, into Joseph Stalins and Leon Trotskys. According to Luther Adler, who played Vladimir Lenin, “In this show we have 22 wigs, 24 mustaches, 10 goatees and 4 beards for a cast in which 35 actors will play more than 100 roles.” Photo: The New York Times

July 1, 1969: A police officer on duty in the 78th Precinct in Brooklyn, dressed as “a tall, voluptuous broad,” according to the picture’s sensitive caption-writer. While he was “in disguise, two men pinched the undercover man where a woman shouldn’t be pinched, and the undercover man pinched them in return. The second pinch was in the form of an arrest,” the photo’s back reads. And, helpfully, it’s pointed out that the policeman “is married and is the father of one child.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times
July 1, 1969: A police officer on duty in the 78th Precinct in Brooklyn, dressed as “a tall, voluptuous broad,” according to the picture’s sensitive caption-writer. While he was “in disguise, two men pinched the undercover man where a woman shouldn’t be pinched, and the undercover man pinched them in return. The second pinch was in the form of an arrest,” the photo’s back reads. And, helpfully, it’s pointed out that the policeman “is married and is the father of one child.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

July 1, 1969: A police officer on duty in the 78th Precinct in Brooklyn, dressed as “a tall, voluptuous broad,” according to the picture’s sensitive caption-writer. While he was “in disguise, two men pinched the undercover man where a woman shouldn’t be pinched, and the undercover man pinched them in return. The second pinch was in the form of an arrest,” the photo’s back reads. And, helpfully, it’s pointed out that the policeman “is married and is the father of one child.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times