The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1960s
Feb. 12, 1965: Flights were canceled at Kennedy Airport because of heavy fog on Lincoln’s Birthday. While this DC-7B sat on the tarmac, a member of the ground crew searched for a Miami-bound airplane that was retreating on the runway. The ground crew member, the caption reported, could hear the other plane but not see it. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times
Feb. 12, 1965: Flights were canceled at Kennedy Airport because of heavy fog on Lincoln’s Birthday. While this DC-7B sat on the tarmac, a member of the ground crew searched for a Miami-bound airplane that was retreating on the runway. The ground crew member, the caption reported, could hear the other plane but not see it. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

Feb. 12, 1965: Flights were canceled at Kennedy Airport because of heavy fog on Lincoln’s Birthday. While this DC-7B sat on the tarmac, a member of the ground crew searched for a Miami-bound airplane that was retreating on the runway. The ground crew member, the caption reported, could hear the other plane but not see it. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

A plainclothes police officer kept watch over rooftops in the Highbridge neighborhood of the Bronx on Nov. 25, 1969, in part of the coverage for a Dec. 24 article that reported on a special Police Department crime analysis, hoping to stem robberies. Though the report said that the victims were likely to be older and white, and that 80 percent of the “robbers, according to descriptions supplied by the victims, were Negroes or Puerto Ricans,” The Times quoted Capt. Salvatore Matteis, the 44th Precinct commander, as saying “This isn’t a matter of race; it’s a matter of economics.” Photo: Michael Evans/The New York Times
A plainclothes police officer kept watch over rooftops in the Highbridge neighborhood of the Bronx on Nov. 25, 1969, in part of the coverage for a Dec. 24 article that reported on a special Police Department crime analysis, hoping to stem robberies. Though the report said that the victims were likely to be older and white, and that 80 percent of the “robbers, according to descriptions supplied by the victims, were Negroes or Puerto Ricans,” The Times quoted Capt. Salvatore Matteis, the 44th Precinct commander, as saying “This isn’t a matter of race; it’s a matter of economics.” Photo: Michael Evans/The New York Times

A plainclothes police officer kept watch over rooftops in the Highbridge neighborhood of the Bronx on Nov. 25, 1969, in part of the coverage for a Dec. 24 article that reported on a special Police Department crime analysis, hoping to stem robberies. Though the report said that the victims were likely to be older and white, and that 80 percent of the “robbers, according to descriptions supplied by the victims, were Negroes or Puerto Ricans,” The Times quoted Capt. Salvatore Matteis, the 44th Precinct commander, as saying “This isn’t a matter of race; it’s a matter of economics.” Photo: Michael Evans/The New York Times

Jan. 14, 1963: Paddy Chayefsky’s play, “The Passion of Josef D.,” put on at the New Amsterdam Theater, required the transforming of actors like Peter Falk, pictured, into Joseph Stalins and Leon Trotskys. According to Luther Adler, who played Vladimir Lenin, “In this show we have 22 wigs, 24 mustaches, 10 goatees and 4 beards for a cast in which 35 actors will play more than 100 roles.” Photo: The New York Times
Jan. 14, 1963: Paddy Chayefsky’s play, “The Passion of Josef D.,” put on at the New Amsterdam Theater, required the transforming of actors like Peter Falk, pictured, into Joseph Stalins and Leon Trotskys. According to Luther Adler, who played Vladimir Lenin, “In this show we have 22 wigs, 24 mustaches, 10 goatees and 4 beards for a cast in which 35 actors will play more than 100 roles.” Photo: The New York Times

Jan. 14, 1963: Paddy Chayefsky’s play, “The Passion of Josef D.,” put on at the New Amsterdam Theater, required the transforming of actors like Peter Falk, pictured, into Joseph Stalins and Leon Trotskys. According to Luther Adler, who played Vladimir Lenin, “In this show we have 22 wigs, 24 mustaches, 10 goatees and 4 beards for a cast in which 35 actors will play more than 100 roles.” Photo: The New York Times

July 1, 1969: A police officer on duty in the 78th Precinct in Brooklyn, dressed as “a tall, voluptuous broad,” according to the picture’s sensitive caption-writer. While he was “in disguise, two men pinched the undercover man where a woman shouldn’t be pinched, and the undercover man pinched them in return. The second pinch was in the form of an arrest,” the photo’s back reads. And, helpfully, it’s pointed out that the policeman “is married and is the father of one child.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times
July 1, 1969: A police officer on duty in the 78th Precinct in Brooklyn, dressed as “a tall, voluptuous broad,” according to the picture’s sensitive caption-writer. While he was “in disguise, two men pinched the undercover man where a woman shouldn’t be pinched, and the undercover man pinched them in return. The second pinch was in the form of an arrest,” the photo’s back reads. And, helpfully, it’s pointed out that the policeman “is married and is the father of one child.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

July 1, 1969: A police officer on duty in the 78th Precinct in Brooklyn, dressed as “a tall, voluptuous broad,” according to the picture’s sensitive caption-writer. While he was “in disguise, two men pinched the undercover man where a woman shouldn’t be pinched, and the undercover man pinched them in return. The second pinch was in the form of an arrest,” the photo’s back reads. And, helpfully, it’s pointed out that the policeman “is married and is the father of one child.” Photo: Don Hogan Charles/The New York Times

May 26, 1961: A sudden noise panicked poor Patrolhorse Cam, who “bolted and plunged” into the East River, The Times reported. His rider, Patrolman John A. Jezsek, rolled off Cam’s back while another patrolman dived in and another called for, who else, the police. “Police launches, a helicopter, emergency service trucks and a Department of Sanitation wrecker with a crane boom” were dispatched. After being examined by the department veterinarian, “Cam was given a rubdown, a stimulant, some hot mash — and the rest of the day off.” Photo: Carl T. Gossett/The New York Times
May 26, 1961: A sudden noise panicked poor Patrolhorse Cam, who “bolted and plunged” into the East River, The Times reported. His rider, Patrolman John A. Jezsek, rolled off Cam’s back while another patrolman dived in and another called for, who else, the police. “Police launches, a helicopter, emergency service trucks and a Department of Sanitation wrecker with a crane boom” were dispatched. After being examined by the department veterinarian, “Cam was given a rubdown, a stimulant, some hot mash — and the rest of the day off.” Photo: Carl T. Gossett/The New York Times

May 26, 1961: A sudden noise panicked poor Patrolhorse Cam, who “bolted and plunged” into the East River, The Times reported. His rider, Patrolman John A. Jezsek, rolled off Cam’s back while another patrolman dived in and another called for, who else, the police. “Police launches, a helicopter, emergency service trucks and a Department of Sanitation wrecker with a crane boom” were dispatched. After being examined by the department veterinarian, “Cam was given a rubdown, a stimulant, some hot mash — and the rest of the day off.” Photo: Carl T. Gossett/The New York Times

Nov. 24, 1964: James Beard, he of the eponymous cooking award, demonstrated cooking at his cooking school on East 10th Street. His book “Delights and Prejudices” was published earlier that year and comprised stories and reflections about his beginnings in the food business. An early gastronomic impression: “I was on all fours. I crawled into the vegetable bin, settled on a giant onion and ate it, skin and all. It must have marked me for life, for I have never ceased to love the hearty flavor of raw onions.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
Nov. 24, 1964: James Beard, he of the eponymous cooking award, demonstrated cooking at his cooking school on East 10th Street. His book “Delights and Prejudices” was published earlier that year and comprised stories and reflections about his beginnings in the food business. An early gastronomic impression: “I was on all fours. I crawled into the vegetable bin, settled on a giant onion and ate it, skin and all. It must have marked me for life, for I have never ceased to love the hearty flavor of raw onions.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

Nov. 24, 1964: James Beard, he of the eponymous cooking award, demonstrated cooking at his cooking school on East 10th Street. His book “Delights and Prejudices” was published earlier that year and comprised stories and reflections about his beginnings in the food business. An early gastronomic impression: “I was on all fours. I crawled into the vegetable bin, settled on a giant onion and ate it, skin and all. It must have marked me for life, for I have never ceased to love the hearty flavor of raw onions.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

May 24, 1960: Sam Falk of The New York Times sought the perfect shot of an aquarium shark in a year when a Jersey Shore shark attack frightened the Metro area. The Times sought to set the record straight on Aug. 28: “Scientists point out there is less chance of a swimmer being attacked by a shark than struck by lightning.” And experts surmised that “there is no real increase, but merely more swimmers and sun bathers to report sighting of sharks” as well as “other large fish, which are often mistaken for sharks.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
May 24, 1960: Sam Falk of The New York Times sought the perfect shot of an aquarium shark in a year when a Jersey Shore shark attack frightened the Metro area. The Times sought to set the record straight on Aug. 28: “Scientists point out there is less chance of a swimmer being attacked by a shark than struck by lightning.” And experts surmised that “there is no real increase, but merely more swimmers and sun bathers to report sighting of sharks” as well as “other large fish, which are often mistaken for sharks.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

May 24, 1960: Sam Falk of The New York Times sought the perfect shot of an aquarium shark in a year when a Jersey Shore shark attack frightened the Metro area. The Times sought to set the record straight on Aug. 28: “Scientists point out there is less chance of a swimmer being attacked by a shark than struck by lightning.” And experts surmised that “there is no real increase, but merely more swimmers and sun bathers to report sighting of sharks” as well as “other large fish, which are often mistaken for sharks.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

April 30, 1961: As part of the “American Assault on Space,” astronauts were ordered to spend up to 24 hours underwater to simulate weightlessness and “problems of dexterity.” There was also the hope to gain traction in the space race with the Soviet Union. However, not, apparently, to gain traction in the Cold War chess race — they decided on checkers. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
April 30, 1961: As part of the “American Assault on Space,” astronauts were ordered to spend up to 24 hours underwater to simulate weightlessness and “problems of dexterity.” There was also the hope to gain traction in the space race with the Soviet Union. However, not, apparently, to gain traction in the Cold War chess race — they decided on checkers. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

April 30, 1961: As part of the “American Assault on Space,” astronauts were ordered to spend up to 24 hours underwater to simulate weightlessness and “problems of dexterity.” There was also the hope to gain traction in the space race with the Soviet Union. However, not, apparently, to gain traction in the Cold War chess race — they decided on checkers. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

Sept. 12, 1960: Flooding on West and Cortlandt Streets, brought by Hurricane Donna, which laid waste to Florida and on up the East Coast. The storm killed dozens in Florida and Puerto Rico and elsewhere. Indeed, according to the National Hurricane Center, it was the United States’ 10th costliest hurricane — adjusted for inflation, population and wealth normalization. The intersection at West and Cortlandt Streets was razed a few years later to make way for the World Trade Center. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times
Sept. 12, 1960: Flooding on West and Cortlandt Streets, brought by Hurricane Donna, which laid waste to Florida and on up the East Coast. The storm killed dozens in Florida and Puerto Rico and elsewhere. Indeed, according to the National Hurricane Center, it was the United States’ 10th costliest hurricane — adjusted for inflation, population and wealth normalization. The intersection at West and Cortlandt Streets was razed a few years later to make way for the World Trade Center. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

Sept. 12, 1960: Flooding on West and Cortlandt Streets, brought by Hurricane Donna, which laid waste to Florida and on up the East Coast. The storm killed dozens in Florida and Puerto Rico and elsewhere. Indeed, according to the National Hurricane Center, it was the United States’ 10th costliest hurricane — adjusted for inflation, population and wealth normalization. The intersection at West and Cortlandt Streets was razed a few years later to make way for the World Trade Center. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

July 1, 1960: Happy campers’ eyes were dry on a day of exodus as 7,000 children from the city boarded trains at Grand Central Terminal to be whisked to various summer camps. “By next Thursday,” The Times reported, “about 35,000 will have passed through the terminal and Pennsylvania Station. Other thousands will depart by bus.” Some children, however, stayed behind, and got soaked, as these children did in the Bronx, playing in front of a fire hydrant opened by the Police Athletic League. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times
July 1, 1960: Happy campers’ eyes were dry on a day of exodus as 7,000 children from the city boarded trains at Grand Central Terminal to be whisked to various summer camps. “By next Thursday,” The Times reported, “about 35,000 will have passed through the terminal and Pennsylvania Station. Other thousands will depart by bus.” Some children, however, stayed behind, and got soaked, as these children did in the Bronx, playing in front of a fire hydrant opened by the Police Athletic League. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

July 1, 1960: Happy campers’ eyes were dry on a day of exodus as 7,000 children from the city boarded trains at Grand Central Terminal to be whisked to various summer camps. “By next Thursday,” The Times reported, “about 35,000 will have passed through the terminal and Pennsylvania Station. Other thousands will depart by bus.” Some children, however, stayed behind, and got soaked, as these children did in the Bronx, playing in front of a fire hydrant opened by the Police Athletic League. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times