The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1950s
June 3, 1953: “In the tramp of ten thousand marching feet the oldest among the spectators heard an echo of the might and majesty of the greatest empire that the world has ever known,” a breathless reporter for The New York Times wrote on the occasion of Queen Elizabeth II’s crowning. “Only the British, among all the peoples of the earth, could have staged such a display and every moment of it seemed to be savored by an appreciative public drawn from the four quarters of the globe and from virtually every nation and people under the sun.” A far cry from these days, when it seems the only thing keeping the monarchy from receding into obscurity is a single tiny baby. Photo: The New York Times
June 3, 1953: “In the tramp of ten thousand marching feet the oldest among the spectators heard an echo of the might and majesty of the greatest empire that the world has ever known,” a breathless reporter for The New York Times wrote on the occasion of Queen Elizabeth II’s crowning. “Only the British, among all the peoples of the earth, could have staged such a display and every moment of it seemed to be savored by an appreciative public drawn from the four quarters of the globe and from virtually every nation and people under the sun.” A far cry from these days, when it seems the only thing keeping the monarchy from receding into obscurity is a single tiny baby. Photo: The New York Times

June 3, 1953: “In the tramp of ten thousand marching feet the oldest among the spectators heard an echo of the might and majesty of the greatest empire that the world has ever known,” a breathless reporter for The New York Times wrote on the occasion of Queen Elizabeth II’s crowning. “Only the British, among all the peoples of the earth, could have staged such a display and every moment of it seemed to be savored by an appreciative public drawn from the four quarters of the globe and from virtually every nation and people under the sun.” A far cry from these days, when it seems the only thing keeping the monarchy from receding into obscurity is a single tiny baby. Photo: The New York Times

Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and waiting. “I’ll probably get fired,” a secretary was quoted complaining. “But I’ve waited this long so I’m going to wait till she comes down — even if I don’t make it back to the office before closing time.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times
Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and waiting. “I’ll probably get fired,” a secretary was quoted complaining. “But I’ve waited this long so I’m going to wait till she comes down — even if I don’t make it back to the office before closing time.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

Oct. 29, 1954: A visit by Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother to New York included being whisked to the 102nd floor observation deck of the Empire State Building. She charmed her American guides, chatting with them amiably and was “nearly mobbed” as she left the building. “How the crowds knew she was in the building was something of a mystery,” The Times reported. “Her decision to make a visit was not made until noon.” People thronged for a glimpse of royalty, even if it meant playing hooky and waiting. “I’ll probably get fired,” a secretary was quoted complaining. “But I’ve waited this long so I’m going to wait till she comes down — even if I don’t make it back to the office before closing time.” Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

In 1955, Easter fell on April 10, and in the day’s paper a stand-alone photo — taken on Good Friday — showed Torrance Helen watering lilies on the 64th floor of the RCA Building (30 Rockefeller Plaza). The picture ran near a mention of an egg-rolling event in Central Park that drew 1,500 children to push eggs across the Great Lawn, and a prediction of 70 degree weather on Sunday. The story provided a variety of other Easter observations, including one for Sing Sing’s 1,450 prisoners, who would “get an opportunity to attend Easter services in chapels bedecked with plants and flowers, enjoy a special dinner and see the movie, ‘Gone With the Wind.’ ” Photo:
In 1955, Easter fell on April 10, and in the day’s paper a stand-alone photo — taken on Good Friday — showed Torrance Helen watering lilies on the 64th floor of the RCA Building (30 Rockefeller Plaza). The picture ran near a mention of an egg-rolling event in Central Park that drew 1,500 children to push eggs across the Great Lawn, and a prediction of 70 degree weather on Sunday. The story provided a variety of other Easter observations, including one for Sing Sing’s 1,450 prisoners, who would “get an opportunity to attend Easter services in chapels bedecked with plants and flowers, enjoy a special dinner and see the movie, ‘Gone With the Wind.’ ” Photo:

In 1955, Easter fell on April 10, and in the day’s paper a stand-alone photo — taken on Good Friday — showed Torrance Helen watering lilies on the 64th floor of the RCA Building (30 Rockefeller Plaza). The picture ran near a mention of an egg-rolling event in Central Park that drew 1,500 children to push eggs across the Great Lawn, and a prediction of 70 degree weather on Sunday. The story provided a variety of other Easter observations, including one for Sing Sing’s 1,450 prisoners, who would “get an opportunity to attend Easter services in chapels bedecked with plants and flowers, enjoy a special dinner and see the movie, ‘Gone With the Wind.’ ” Photo:

July 19, 1954: One of the more boastful cruise ships to set sail since the Titanic, the superliner United States (“America’s largest, fastest and newest passenger liner”) had an appointment with its own special “beauty parlor” in Bayonne, N.J. “A spokesman for the line said this would be the third time in her two-year career that she would be looked over below the waterline,” The Times reported. “Work to be performed at Bayonne will include bottom scraping, painting and a check of her propellers.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times
July 19, 1954: One of the more boastful cruise ships to set sail since the Titanic, the superliner United States (“America’s largest, fastest and newest passenger liner”) had an appointment with its own special “beauty parlor” in Bayonne, N.J. “A spokesman for the line said this would be the third time in her two-year career that she would be looked over below the waterline,” The Times reported. “Work to be performed at Bayonne will include bottom scraping, painting and a check of her propellers.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

July 19, 1954: One of the more boastful cruise ships to set sail since the Titanic, the superliner United States (“America’s largest, fastest and newest passenger liner”) had an appointment with its own special “beauty parlor” in Bayonne, N.J. “A spokesman for the line said this would be the third time in her two-year career that she would be looked over below the waterline,” The Times reported. “Work to be performed at Bayonne will include bottom scraping, painting and a check of her propellers.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

April 4, 1956: Hugh Wiley, “the 29-year-old seagoing horseman on leave from the Navy” led his horse up a chartered plane at Idlewild, now Kennedy Airport, for Hamburg, where the Olympic riding team was en route for training before arriving in Stockholm. Though the 1956 Olympics were held in Melbourne, Australia, Australia’s fear of horse-borne diseases meant a six-month quarantine; the International Olympic Committee decided it was easier to host the horse events in Europe. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times
April 4, 1956: Hugh Wiley, “the 29-year-old seagoing horseman on leave from the Navy” led his horse up a chartered plane at Idlewild, now Kennedy Airport, for Hamburg, where the Olympic riding team was en route for training before arriving in Stockholm. Though the 1956 Olympics were held in Melbourne, Australia, Australia’s fear of horse-borne diseases meant a six-month quarantine; the International Olympic Committee decided it was easier to host the horse events in Europe. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

April 4, 1956: Hugh Wiley, “the 29-year-old seagoing horseman on leave from the Navy” led his horse up a chartered plane at Idlewild, now Kennedy Airport, for Hamburg, where the Olympic riding team was en route for training before arriving in Stockholm. Though the 1956 Olympics were held in Melbourne, Australia, Australia’s fear of horse-borne diseases meant a six-month quarantine; the International Olympic Committee decided it was easier to host the horse events in Europe. Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos
A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos

Aug. 12, 1959: “4 Chimp Children Take Up the City Ways,” the headline said, explaining how these chimpanzees at the Bronx Zoo leapt into the city water on hot New York days, even though they would never swim in the Congo. “On warmer mornings, they get wet without coaxing although they squeal and hesitate like human 4-year-olds,” The Times reported. As well as smooch their masters like human 4-year-olds. Photo: Arthur Brower/The New York Times
Aug. 12, 1959: “4 Chimp Children Take Up the City Ways,” the headline said, explaining how these chimpanzees at the Bronx Zoo leapt into the city water on hot New York days, even though they would never swim in the Congo. “On warmer mornings, they get wet without coaxing although they squeal and hesitate like human 4-year-olds,” The Times reported. As well as smooch their masters like human 4-year-olds. Photo: Arthur Brower/The New York Times

Aug. 12, 1959: “4 Chimp Children Take Up the City Ways,” the headline said, explaining how these chimpanzees at the Bronx Zoo leapt into the city water on hot New York days, even though they would never swim in the Congo. “On warmer mornings, they get wet without coaxing although they squeal and hesitate like human 4-year-olds,” The Times reported. As well as smooch their masters like human 4-year-olds. Photo: Arthur Brower/The New York Times

May 12, 1958: A contact sheet from a photo shoot at the Bronx Zoo for which an emperor penguin named Jill was the star, occasioning the addition of two duck-billed platypuses, which called “attention to the many other outstanding specimens” at the zoo. “The emperors are hand-fed — five pounds of mackerel a day,” her keeper, Chappie Solanto, told the Times magazine. “The public thinks they look like old men. And people are surprised at their fatness and that they don’t go into the water like other penguins here.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
May 12, 1958: A contact sheet from a photo shoot at the Bronx Zoo for which an emperor penguin named Jill was the star, occasioning the addition of two duck-billed platypuses, which called “attention to the many other outstanding specimens” at the zoo. “The emperors are hand-fed — five pounds of mackerel a day,” her keeper, Chappie Solanto, told the Times magazine. “The public thinks they look like old men. And people are surprised at their fatness and that they don’t go into the water like other penguins here.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

May 12, 1958: A contact sheet from a photo shoot at the Bronx Zoo for which an emperor penguin named Jill was the star, occasioning the addition of two duck-billed platypuses, which called “attention to the many other outstanding specimens” at the zoo. “The emperors are hand-fed — five pounds of mackerel a day,” her keeper, Chappie Solanto, told the Times magazine. “The public thinks they look like old men. And people are surprised at their fatness and that they don’t go into the water like other penguins here.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

April 12, 1956: A colony of Antarctica’s comical flightless bird, the penguin, waddling across icy rock in an unpublished picture from a spread of images taken during the United States-led mission, Operation Deepfreeze, to reach the South Pole. The Cold War-era operation was in preparation for the International Geophysical Year, a period of international cooperation, including that of the Soviet Union, to explore Earth’s most hard-to-reach places, plumbing the depths, soaring the heights and crossing its underbelly. Photo: Bernard Kalb/The New York Times.
April 12, 1956: A colony of Antarctica’s comical flightless bird, the penguin, waddling across icy rock in an unpublished picture from a spread of images taken during the United States-led mission, Operation Deepfreeze, to reach the South Pole. The Cold War-era operation was in preparation for the International Geophysical Year, a period of international cooperation, including that of the Soviet Union, to explore Earth’s most hard-to-reach places, plumbing the depths, soaring the heights and crossing its underbelly. Photo: Bernard Kalb/The New York Times.

April 12, 1956: A colony of Antarctica’s comical flightless bird, the penguin, waddling across icy rock in an unpublished picture from a spread of images taken during the United States-led mission, Operation Deepfreeze, to reach the South Pole. The Cold War-era operation was in preparation for the International Geophysical Year, a period of international cooperation, including that of the Soviet Union, to explore Earth’s most hard-to-reach places, plumbing the depths, soaring the heights and crossing its underbelly. Photo: Bernard Kalb/The New York Times.

July 6, 1953: With the photographer Sam Falk visible on the front of the helicopter’s bubble shield, two police officers sat ready at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn to begin a patrol. “The helicopters of the Police Department Aviation Bureau, which heretofore flew daily at random all over the city, will start today to patrol the city’s waterfront, waterways and the five boroughs on a regular ‘beat’ basis,” The Times reported two weeks earlier. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
July 6, 1953: With the photographer Sam Falk visible on the front of the helicopter’s bubble shield, two police officers sat ready at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn to begin a patrol. “The helicopters of the Police Department Aviation Bureau, which heretofore flew daily at random all over the city, will start today to patrol the city’s waterfront, waterways and the five boroughs on a regular ‘beat’ basis,” The Times reported two weeks earlier. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

July 6, 1953: With the photographer Sam Falk visible on the front of the helicopter’s bubble shield, two police officers sat ready at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn to begin a patrol. “The helicopters of the Police Department Aviation Bureau, which heretofore flew daily at random all over the city, will start today to patrol the city’s waterfront, waterways and the five boroughs on a regular ‘beat’ basis,” The Times reported two weeks earlier. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times