The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1950s
April 4, 1957 was one for New York’s history books, as a record 2.4 inches of snow fell, coating Central Park’s boats and budding trees. Twenty-five years later, almost to the day on April 6, 1982, 9.6 inches fell on, or rather, crushed, the city, and since New York was hardly spared of snow this year (February was the second snowiest on record), one can only wait with a wintry mix of hope and dread for what April 2014 will bring. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
April 4, 1957 was one for New York’s history books, as a record 2.4 inches of snow fell, coating Central Park’s boats and budding trees. Twenty-five years later, almost to the day on April 6, 1982, 9.6 inches fell on, or rather, crushed, the city, and since New York was hardly spared of snow this year (February was the second snowiest on record), one can only wait with a wintry mix of hope and dread for what April 2014 will bring. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

April 4, 1957 was one for New York’s history books, as a record 2.4 inches of snow fell, coating Central Park’s boats and budding trees. Twenty-five years later, almost to the day on April 6, 1982, 9.6 inches fell on, or rather, crushed, the city, and since New York was hardly spared of snow this year (February was the second snowiest on record), one can only wait with a wintry mix of hope and dread for what April 2014 will bring. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

March 5, 1958: An obsolete Sherman tank, named for the Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman and bought on surplus, was used to demolish obsolete housing at 57th Street and Broadway in West New York, N.J. But it toppled the old Army barracks on top of it, and its operators were briefly trapped inside, till a “power scoop” came to free them, unhurt. Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times
March 5, 1958: An obsolete Sherman tank, named for the Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman and bought on surplus, was used to demolish obsolete housing at 57th Street and Broadway in West New York, N.J. But it toppled the old Army barracks on top of it, and its operators were briefly trapped inside, till a “power scoop” came to free them, unhurt. Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

March 5, 1958: An obsolete Sherman tank, named for the Civil War general William Tecumseh Sherman and bought on surplus, was used to demolish obsolete housing at 57th Street and Broadway in West New York, N.J. But it toppled the old Army barracks on top of it, and its operators were briefly trapped inside, till a “power scoop” came to free them, unhurt. Photo: Patrick A. Burns/The New York Times

A brief taut with mystery and suspense, in the paper of March 11, 1953: Gloria Teich, of Riverside Drive, seemed to think her vehicle was sinking as she tried to unlock it for an afternoon drive. “Astonished by the strange occurrence, she stood for a moment, staring. Sure enough, it was sinking slowly into the earth. By the time Mrs. Teich collected her wits sufficiently to attempt to drive the car away, it was too late.” The culprit was determined to be a water main leak, and the car was towed out of the hole by 4 p.m. Photo: George Alexanderson/The New York Times
A brief taut with mystery and suspense, in the paper of March 11, 1953: Gloria Teich, of Riverside Drive, seemed to think her vehicle was sinking as she tried to unlock it for an afternoon drive. “Astonished by the strange occurrence, she stood for a moment, staring. Sure enough, it was sinking slowly into the earth. By the time Mrs. Teich collected her wits sufficiently to attempt to drive the car away, it was too late.” The culprit was determined to be a water main leak, and the car was towed out of the hole by 4 p.m. Photo: George Alexanderson/The New York Times

A brief taut with mystery and suspense, in the paper of March 11, 1953: Gloria Teich, of Riverside Drive, seemed to think her vehicle was sinking as she tried to unlock it for an afternoon drive. “Astonished by the strange occurrence, she stood for a moment, staring. Sure enough, it was sinking slowly into the earth. By the time Mrs. Teich collected her wits sufficiently to attempt to drive the car away, it was too late.” The culprit was determined to be a water main leak, and the car was towed out of the hole by 4 p.m. Photo: George Alexanderson/The New York Times

A vehicle is unloaded from a ship moored in a Brooklyn pier, but there was little shipping news in the paper of Friday, July 13, 1951. What news there was included a notice reporting a shrinkage of the United States’ “dry” population, which noted that New York led in total beer consumption, but was sixth in per capita consumption. Another brief noted that the Russian premier Joseph Stalin had received an African lion as a “present from a South African admirer.” And for those fretting about what to do with their blueberries, some recipes gave guidance. Photo: The New York Times
A vehicle is unloaded from a ship moored in a Brooklyn pier, but there was little shipping news in the paper of Friday, July 13, 1951. What news there was included a notice reporting a shrinkage of the United States’ “dry” population, which noted that New York led in total beer consumption, but was sixth in per capita consumption. Another brief noted that the Russian premier Joseph Stalin had received an African lion as a “present from a South African admirer.” And for those fretting about what to do with their blueberries, some recipes gave guidance. Photo: The New York Times

A vehicle is unloaded from a ship moored in a Brooklyn pier, but there was little shipping news in the paper of Friday, July 13, 1951. What news there was included a notice reporting a shrinkage of the United States’ “dry” population, which noted that New York led in total beer consumption, but was sixth in per capita consumption. Another brief noted that the Russian premier Joseph Stalin had received an African lion as a “present from a South African admirer.” And for those fretting about what to do with their blueberries, some recipes gave guidance. Photo: The New York Times

Jan. 11, 1957: The superintendent of 2001 Grand Concourse in the Bronx, Mary Sideris, swept away floodwater from a water main break in the building’s courtyard. Traffic was rerouted and the subway closed, and the break left a hole 15 feet wide and 10 feet deep. In 1980, Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman of New York’s 16th district illustrated a point about the state of New York’s water pipes using Ms. Sideris’s image alongside a letter to the editor. “In 1979 there were over 500 water main breaks in the city,” Rep. Holtzman wrote, decrying an estimated loss of 30 percent of the water that enters the system. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Jan. 11, 1957: The superintendent of 2001 Grand Concourse in the Bronx, Mary Sideris, swept away floodwater from a water main break in the building’s courtyard. Traffic was rerouted and the subway closed, and the break left a hole 15 feet wide and 10 feet deep. In 1980, Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman of New York’s 16th district illustrated a point about the state of New York’s water pipes using Ms. Sideris’s image alongside a letter to the editor. “In 1979 there were over 500 water main breaks in the city,” Rep. Holtzman wrote, decrying an estimated loss of 30 percent of the water that enters the system. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Jan. 11, 1957: The superintendent of 2001 Grand Concourse in the Bronx, Mary Sideris, swept away floodwater from a water main break in the building’s courtyard. Traffic was rerouted and the subway closed, and the break left a hole 15 feet wide and 10 feet deep. In 1980, Rep. Elizabeth Holtzman of New York’s 16th district illustrated a point about the state of New York’s water pipes using Ms. Sideris’s image alongside a letter to the editor. “In 1979 there were over 500 water main breaks in the city,” Rep. Holtzman wrote, decrying an estimated loss of 30 percent of the water that enters the system. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

July 26, 1954: Sightseeing atop the Empire State Building, one of the “Five Wonders of New York,” which were given a large photo spread in that day’s paper. Elsewhere, though, a tiny column called “Other Sights” suggested a trip to the Cloisters or a stroll in Central Park along the secluded paths, where the mind, by way of the poet Andrew Marvell, is “annihilating all that’s made to a green thought in a green shade.” Photo: The New York Times
July 26, 1954: Sightseeing atop the Empire State Building, one of the “Five Wonders of New York,” which were given a large photo spread in that day’s paper. Elsewhere, though, a tiny column called “Other Sights” suggested a trip to the Cloisters or a stroll in Central Park along the secluded paths, where the mind, by way of the poet Andrew Marvell, is “annihilating all that’s made to a green thought in a green shade.” Photo: The New York Times

July 26, 1954: Sightseeing atop the Empire State Building, one of the “Five Wonders of New York,” which were given a large photo spread in that day’s paper. Elsewhere, though, a tiny column called “Other Sights” suggested a trip to the Cloisters or a stroll in Central Park along the secluded paths, where the mind, by way of the poet Andrew Marvell, is “annihilating all that’s made to a green thought in a green shade.” Photo: The New York Times

The heat of July 1954 did not stop these intrepid tourists from making a go of it in the city. In the days leading to July 21, when the photo was taken, food crops had been destroyed, storms had killed 10 and an eclipse was obscured by clouds in Ontario. And in Brooklyn, at a mobile animal clinic for checkups, neighborhood pets were affected, too. Reported The Times: “These dog days shouldn’t happen to a dog. Especially a fat dog, and there are a lot of those.” Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
The heat of July 1954 did not stop these intrepid tourists from making a go of it in the city. In the days leading to July 21, when the photo was taken, food crops had been destroyed, storms had killed 10 and an eclipse was obscured by clouds in Ontario. And in Brooklyn, at a mobile animal clinic for checkups, neighborhood pets were affected, too. Reported The Times: “These dog days shouldn’t happen to a dog. Especially a fat dog, and there are a lot of those.” Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

The heat of July 1954 did not stop these intrepid tourists from making a go of it in the city. In the days leading to July 21, when the photo was taken, food crops had been destroyed, storms had killed 10 and an eclipse was obscured by clouds in Ontario. And in Brooklyn, at a mobile animal clinic for checkups, neighborhood pets were affected, too. Reported The Times: “These dog days shouldn’t happen to a dog. Especially a fat dog, and there are a lot of those.” Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Feb. 3, 1954: Though Mr. Chuckles, a spotted cat native to Central and South America known as a margay, was terrifying to 2-year-old William J. Clarke III — to clarify, he is the one in the cage — at the Empire Cat Club’s Annual Championship Show at the Hotel Belmont Plaza, it was the shorthair Ginger, “an unimpressed individualist from the alleys,” who sent Mr. Chuckles to an “undignified retreat” behind a chair, The Times reported. Wu Oedipus, a Siamese kitten, watched the scene from inside the brandy snifter he had gotten stuck in. Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times
Feb. 3, 1954: Though Mr. Chuckles, a spotted cat native to Central and South America known as a margay, was terrifying to 2-year-old William J. Clarke III — to clarify, he is the one in the cage — at the Empire Cat Club’s Annual Championship Show at the Hotel Belmont Plaza, it was the shorthair Ginger, “an unimpressed individualist from the alleys,” who sent Mr. Chuckles to an “undignified retreat” behind a chair, The Times reported. Wu Oedipus, a Siamese kitten, watched the scene from inside the brandy snifter he had gotten stuck in. Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

Feb. 3, 1954: Though Mr. Chuckles, a spotted cat native to Central and South America known as a margay, was terrifying to 2-year-old William J. Clarke III — to clarify, he is the one in the cage — at the Empire Cat Club’s Annual Championship Show at the Hotel Belmont Plaza, it was the shorthair Ginger, “an unimpressed individualist from the alleys,” who sent Mr. Chuckles to an “undignified retreat” behind a chair, The Times reported. Wu Oedipus, a Siamese kitten, watched the scene from inside the brandy snifter he had gotten stuck in. Photo: Ernie Sisto/The New York Times

Nov. 1, 1955: The zookeeper Fred Martini, of the Bronx Zoo’s lion house, with Dot and Dash, newly arrived yet sensitive cheetahs. They were reported to “make certain that their antics” — which included paw swipes, pants-tugging, jumping and nipping — “were all in good fun,” and not a prelude to mauling Mr. Martini before the crowd. They concluded the meet-and-greet by gently licking his face and hands. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Nov. 1, 1955: The zookeeper Fred Martini, of the Bronx Zoo’s lion house, with Dot and Dash, newly arrived yet sensitive cheetahs. They were reported to “make certain that their antics” — which included paw swipes, pants-tugging, jumping and nipping — “were all in good fun,” and not a prelude to mauling Mr. Martini before the crowd. They concluded the meet-and-greet by gently licking his face and hands. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Nov. 1, 1955: The zookeeper Fred Martini, of the Bronx Zoo’s lion house, with Dot and Dash, newly arrived yet sensitive cheetahs. They were reported to “make certain that their antics” — which included paw swipes, pants-tugging, jumping and nipping — “were all in good fun,” and not a prelude to mauling Mr. Martini before the crowd. They concluded the meet-and-greet by gently licking his face and hands. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times