The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1940s
Oct. 4, 1949: How better to sell the government’s debt than with multitudes of the smiling visage of President Harry S. Truman? Such was the thinking in 1949, when a group of “the country’s top cartoonists and comic-strip artists” was assembled to accompany a traveling exhibit of their work to help sell government bonds. Before the tour began, reported The Times, they gathered in the Rose Garden to meet with the president, face to faces. Photo: Bruce Hoertel/The New York Times
Oct. 4, 1949: How better to sell the government’s debt than with multitudes of the smiling visage of President Harry S. Truman? Such was the thinking in 1949, when a group of “the country’s top cartoonists and comic-strip artists” was assembled to accompany a traveling exhibit of their work to help sell government bonds. Before the tour began, reported The Times, they gathered in the Rose Garden to meet with the president, face to faces. Photo: Bruce Hoertel/The New York Times

Oct. 4, 1949: How better to sell the government’s debt than with multitudes of the smiling visage of President Harry S. Truman? Such was the thinking in 1949, when a group of “the country’s top cartoonists and comic-strip artists” was assembled to accompany a traveling exhibit of their work to help sell government bonds. Before the tour began, reported The Times, they gathered in the Rose Garden to meet with the president, face to faces. Photo: Bruce Hoertel/The New York Times

April 7, 1946: “Despite Cain’s stare, Queen Victoria hasn’t a hangover. The ‘icebag’ protects her elaborately carved crown,” The Times reported in the magazine. “Wonderful as are the works in the display galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art — one of the five or six great treasure houses of this world — a large part of the museum’s wonders is hidden from view in some forty storerooms, most of them underground,” wrote Charles Grutzner. Other pictures of some of the museum’s treasures sport innuendo-rife captions: “Bronze nudes and a marble Antigone share museum’s nether regions with a giant boar and undraped Venuses.” Photo: The New York Times
April 7, 1946: “Despite Cain’s stare, Queen Victoria hasn’t a hangover. The ‘icebag’ protects her elaborately carved crown,” The Times reported in the magazine. “Wonderful as are the works in the display galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art — one of the five or six great treasure houses of this world — a large part of the museum’s wonders is hidden from view in some forty storerooms, most of them underground,” wrote Charles Grutzner. Other pictures of some of the museum’s treasures sport innuendo-rife captions: “Bronze nudes and a marble Antigone share museum’s nether regions with a giant boar and undraped Venuses.” Photo: The New York Times

April 7, 1946: “Despite Cain’s stare, Queen Victoria hasn’t a hangover. The ‘icebag’ protects her elaborately carved crown,” The Times reported in the magazine. “Wonderful as are the works in the display galleries of the Metropolitan Museum of Art — one of the five or six great treasure houses of this world — a large part of the museum’s wonders is hidden from view in some forty storerooms, most of them underground,” wrote Charles Grutzner. Other pictures of some of the museum’s treasures sport innuendo-rife captions: “Bronze nudes and a marble Antigone share museum’s nether regions with a giant boar and undraped Venuses.” Photo: The New York Times

A stamp on the back of this picture from Japan reads April 25, 1945, on which date The Times had blaring headlines about the state of the war in Europe (it was winding down), and a smaller article at the bottom of the front page about an impasse at Okinawa, in the Pacific, that “American infantrymen” had brought to an end. “The fighting was heavy along the entire front as the doughboys moved cautiously from one fortification to another and there were as yet no indications of large gains,” The Times reported. Photo: The New York Times
A stamp on the back of this picture from Japan reads April 25, 1945, on which date The Times had blaring headlines about the state of the war in Europe (it was winding down), and a smaller article at the bottom of the front page about an impasse at Okinawa, in the Pacific, that “American infantrymen” had brought to an end. “The fighting was heavy along the entire front as the doughboys moved cautiously from one fortification to another and there were as yet no indications of large gains,” The Times reported. Photo: The New York Times

A stamp on the back of this picture from Japan reads April 25, 1945, on which date The Times had blaring headlines about the state of the war in Europe (it was winding down), and a smaller article at the bottom of the front page about an impasse at Okinawa, in the Pacific, that “American infantrymen” had brought to an end. “The fighting was heavy along the entire front as the doughboys moved cautiously from one fortification to another and there were as yet no indications of large gains,” The Times reported. Photo: The New York Times

Not Potsdam, not Yalta: Tehran. At the end of November 1943, the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, from left, welcomed his American and British counterparts, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston Churchill at the Russian Embassy in Tehran. At the meeting, several key decisions were made, not the least of which was Roosevelt’s promise to Stalin to open a second front against the Nazis in France. There was also a dinner at which Churchill offered Stalin the “Sword of Stalingrad,” which, after kissing it, some reports said, Stalin handed to a Russian officer who promptly dropped it on his own foot. Photo: Wide World Photos
Not Potsdam, not Yalta: Tehran. At the end of November 1943, the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, from left, welcomed his American and British counterparts, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston Churchill at the Russian Embassy in Tehran. At the meeting, several key decisions were made, not the least of which was Roosevelt’s promise to Stalin to open a second front against the Nazis in France. There was also a dinner at which Churchill offered Stalin the “Sword of Stalingrad,” which, after kissing it, some reports said, Stalin handed to a Russian officer who promptly dropped it on his own foot. Photo: Wide World Photos

Not Potsdam, not Yalta: Tehran. At the end of November 1943, the Soviet leader Joseph Stalin, from left, welcomed his American and British counterparts, President Franklin D. Roosevelt and Prime Minister Winston Churchill at the Russian Embassy in Tehran. At the meeting, several key decisions were made, not the least of which was Roosevelt’s promise to Stalin to open a second front against the Nazis in France. There was also a dinner at which Churchill offered Stalin the “Sword of Stalingrad,” which, after kissing it, some reports said, Stalin handed to a Russian officer who promptly dropped it on his own foot. Photo: Wide World Photos

March 31, 1940: The circus came to New York, heralding, according to The Times, spring’s arrival. But before coming to New York, the circus had been incubating in Sarasota, Fla., where performers fine-tuned their acts, like Lucia Christiani’s two-horse backward somersault through a hoop. Photo: The New York Times
March 31, 1940: The circus came to New York, heralding, according to The Times, spring’s arrival. But before coming to New York, the circus had been incubating in Sarasota, Fla., where performers fine-tuned their acts, like Lucia Christiani’s two-horse backward somersault through a hoop. Photo: The New York Times

March 31, 1940: The circus came to New York, heralding, according to The Times, spring’s arrival. But before coming to New York, the circus had been incubating in Sarasota, Fla., where performers fine-tuned their acts, like Lucia Christiani’s two-horse backward somersault through a hoop. Photo: The New York Times

Sept. 7, 1947: Ballerinas following the steps of Jerome Robbins, who choreographed “High Button Shoes,” a musical comedy that, according to The Times, the pit musicians called “The Ballet of the Bleeding Lips.” “If anything approaching the pandemonium of this ballet occurred on a city street the riot squads would be summoned forthwith,” it was reported. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
Sept. 7, 1947: Ballerinas following the steps of Jerome Robbins, who choreographed “High Button Shoes,” a musical comedy that, according to The Times, the pit musicians called “The Ballet of the Bleeding Lips.” “If anything approaching the pandemonium of this ballet occurred on a city street the riot squads would be summoned forthwith,” it was reported. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

Sept. 7, 1947: Ballerinas following the steps of Jerome Robbins, who choreographed “High Button Shoes,” a musical comedy that, according to The Times, the pit musicians called “The Ballet of the Bleeding Lips.” “If anything approaching the pandemonium of this ballet occurred on a city street the riot squads would be summoned forthwith,” it was reported. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

March 13, 1947: Coiled firehoses at the scene of a South Street blaze, published in 1951 in a Sunday magazine roundup of fire stories, “some fairly curious recent episodes in which fire was the villain,” for National Fire Prevention Week. Some of those curious episodes included a man who tried to kill mosquitos by tossing flour into the air and brushing a lit torch through the dust cloud (it “flattened his home”) or a man who, after a fight with his wife, wrote a fake suicide note to scare her after she walked out, then turned on the gas. “He waited a while, had another little drink or two, and tried to light a cigarette. A month or so later he was out of the hospital, but the house had to be rebuilt.” The piece did not report if there was a reconciliation. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
March 13, 1947: Coiled firehoses at the scene of a South Street blaze, published in 1951 in a Sunday magazine roundup of fire stories, “some fairly curious recent episodes in which fire was the villain,” for National Fire Prevention Week. Some of those curious episodes included a man who tried to kill mosquitos by tossing flour into the air and brushing a lit torch through the dust cloud (it “flattened his home”) or a man who, after a fight with his wife, wrote a fake suicide note to scare her after she walked out, then turned on the gas. “He waited a while, had another little drink or two, and tried to light a cigarette. A month or so later he was out of the hospital, but the house had to be rebuilt.” The piece did not report if there was a reconciliation. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

March 13, 1947: Coiled firehoses at the scene of a South Street blaze, published in 1951 in a Sunday magazine roundup of fire stories, “some fairly curious recent episodes in which fire was the villain,” for National Fire Prevention Week. Some of those curious episodes included a man who tried to kill mosquitos by tossing flour into the air and brushing a lit torch through the dust cloud (it “flattened his home”) or a man who, after a fight with his wife, wrote a fake suicide note to scare her after she walked out, then turned on the gas. “He waited a while, had another little drink or two, and tried to light a cigarette. A month or so later he was out of the hospital, but the house had to be rebuilt.” The piece did not report if there was a reconciliation. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

April 24, 1948: The freighter Charles Tufts, which crashed on the shores of Sea Gate, Brooklyn, made an addition to the spectacles available to Coney Island sightseers. The Charles Tufts was a Liberty ship, one of the fleet of cargo vessels built during World War II, and the man it was named for donated the land in Medford, Mass., that would eventually become Tufts University. It took 12 hours and five tugboats to free the boat. Photo: The New York Times
April 24, 1948: The freighter Charles Tufts, which crashed on the shores of Sea Gate, Brooklyn, made an addition to the spectacles available to Coney Island sightseers. The Charles Tufts was a Liberty ship, one of the fleet of cargo vessels built during World War II, and the man it was named for donated the land in Medford, Mass., that would eventually become Tufts University. It took 12 hours and five tugboats to free the boat. Photo: The New York Times

April 24, 1948: The freighter Charles Tufts, which crashed on the shores of Sea Gate, Brooklyn, made an addition to the spectacles available to Coney Island sightseers. The Charles Tufts was a Liberty ship, one of the fleet of cargo vessels built during World War II, and the man it was named for donated the land in Medford, Mass., that would eventually become Tufts University. It took 12 hours and five tugboats to free the boat. Photo: The New York Times

July 21, 1943: An M-7 tank, on its way to be inspected by Mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia and then put on display. The tank was lauded for its success routing the Axis forces out of Sicily and North in “Operation Husky,” and, as The Times reported, was “known to the British forces as ‘the priest,’ because of the pulpit-like appearance of its anti-aircraft gun mount.” Photo: The New York Times
July 21, 1943: An M-7 tank, on its way to be inspected by Mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia and then put on display. The tank was lauded for its success routing the Axis forces out of Sicily and North in “Operation Husky,” and, as The Times reported, was “known to the British forces as ‘the priest,’ because of the pulpit-like appearance of its anti-aircraft gun mount.” Photo: The New York Times

July 21, 1943: An M-7 tank, on its way to be inspected by Mayor Fiorello H. La Guardia and then put on display. The tank was lauded for its success routing the Axis forces out of Sicily and North in “Operation Husky,” and, as The Times reported, was “known to the British forces as ‘the priest,’ because of the pulpit-like appearance of its anti-aircraft gun mount.” Photo: The New York Times