The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1930s
Douglas MacLean, with a record catch of barracuda. Mr. MacLean was a star of silent films like “Seven Keys to Baldpate,” or “Soft Cushions,” the latter of which co-starred a cricket that was “captured in California and trained to tricks.” It was also reported that the “cricket donned a make-up for the part,” and was “expected to race a brother cricket in a novel game invented by MacLean. In order to distinguish the two crickets one wears a dab of grease paint.” Though this picture is undated, one is tempted to guess it was taken before his second divorce, in 1948, from Barbara Barondes, a former Broadway actress. That news appeared alongside an unrelated notice headed “Bees Get Dander Up,” which described a scene like something from a slapstick farce: “Angry bees on the farm of G.P. Steyn, of Orange River, South Africa, drove his pigs into a duck pond, chased his cows through the krall gate and killed many chickens.” Photo: The New York Times
Douglas MacLean, with a record catch of barracuda. Mr. MacLean was a star of silent films like “Seven Keys to Baldpate,” or “Soft Cushions,” the latter of which co-starred a cricket that was “captured in California and trained to tricks.” It was also reported that the “cricket donned a make-up for the part,” and was “expected to race a brother cricket in a novel game invented by MacLean. In order to distinguish the two crickets one wears a dab of grease paint.” Though this picture is undated, one is tempted to guess it was taken before his second divorce, in 1948, from Barbara Barondes, a former Broadway actress. That news appeared alongside an unrelated notice headed “Bees Get Dander Up,” which described a scene like something from a slapstick farce: “Angry bees on the farm of G.P. Steyn, of Orange River, South Africa, drove his pigs into a duck pond, chased his cows through the krall gate and killed many chickens.” Photo: The New York Times

Douglas MacLean, with a record catch of barracuda. Mr. MacLean was a star of silent films like “Seven Keys to Baldpate,” or “Soft Cushions,” the latter of which co-starred a cricket that was “captured in California and trained to tricks.” It was also reported that the “cricket donned a make-up for the part,” and was “expected to race a brother cricket in a novel game invented by MacLean. In order to distinguish the two crickets one wears a dab of grease paint.” Though this picture is undated, one is tempted to guess it was taken before his second divorce, in 1948, from Barbara Barondes, a former Broadway actress. That news appeared alongside an unrelated notice headed “Bees Get Dander Up,” which described a scene like something from a slapstick farce: “Angry bees on the farm of G.P. Steyn, of Orange River, South Africa, drove his pigs into a duck pond, chased his cows through the krall gate and killed many chickens.” Photo: The New York Times

Jan. 4, 1933: The oceanliner L’Atlantique, en route to Cherbourg from Bordeaux for “annual overhauling,” caught fire near the Normandy coast, near its destination,  and “rumors of sabotage were current.” The fire had spread so swiftly, starting from somewhere in the first-class quarters, that its cause couldn’t be determined, and 17 of its 238 crew were presumed dead (and, later, five stowaways were found dead). A literal tug-o’-war ensued, as ships from France, Germany and the Netherlands vied to tow it back and receive compensation. A French and Dutch ship reached the beleaguered vessel first, and “the tugs started pulling in opposite directions, getting nowhere and endangering the L’Atlantique even further.” Order was restored by a nearby warship. Photo: The New York Times
Jan. 4, 1933: The oceanliner L’Atlantique, en route to Cherbourg from Bordeaux for “annual overhauling,” caught fire near the Normandy coast, near its destination,  and “rumors of sabotage were current.” The fire had spread so swiftly, starting from somewhere in the first-class quarters, that its cause couldn’t be determined, and 17 of its 238 crew were presumed dead (and, later, five stowaways were found dead). A literal tug-o’-war ensued, as ships from France, Germany and the Netherlands vied to tow it back and receive compensation. A French and Dutch ship reached the beleaguered vessel first, and “the tugs started pulling in opposite directions, getting nowhere and endangering the L’Atlantique even further.” Order was restored by a nearby warship. Photo: The New York Times

Jan. 4, 1933: The oceanliner L’Atlantique, en route to Cherbourg from Bordeaux for “annual overhauling,” caught fire near the Normandy coast, near its destination,  and “rumors of sabotage were current.” The fire had spread so swiftly, starting from somewhere in the first-class quarters, that its cause couldn’t be determined, and 17 of its 238 crew were presumed dead (and, later, five stowaways were found dead). A literal tug-o’-war ensued, as ships from France, Germany and the Netherlands vied to tow it back and receive compensation. A French and Dutch ship reached the beleaguered vessel first, and “the tugs started pulling in opposite directions, getting nowhere and endangering the L’Atlantique even further.” Order was restored by a nearby warship. Photo: The New York Times

May 14, 1935: The American yacht Yankee, towed into Gosport, in southern England, to compete in the America’s Cup (which is an international award named for a schooner named America, which raced around the Isle of Wight and earned the inaugural trophy in 1851). After months of fervent speculation and drama, the Yankee had a mixed record,  often bested by the Endeavour and the Astra, before being scrapped in 1941. Photo: The New York Times
May 14, 1935: The American yacht Yankee, towed into Gosport, in southern England, to compete in the America’s Cup (which is an international award named for a schooner named America, which raced around the Isle of Wight and earned the inaugural trophy in 1851). After months of fervent speculation and drama, the Yankee had a mixed record,  often bested by the Endeavour and the Astra, before being scrapped in 1941. Photo: The New York Times

May 14, 1935: The American yacht Yankee, towed into Gosport, in southern England, to compete in the America’s Cup (which is an international award named for a schooner named America, which raced around the Isle of Wight and earned the inaugural trophy in 1851). After months of fervent speculation and drama, the Yankee had a mixed record,  often bested by the Endeavour and the Astra, before being scrapped in 1941. Photo: The New York Times

June 3, 1933: A drydock inspection of one of the S.S. Manhattan’s propellers in Brooklyn, claimed by the caption to drive the ship two feet forward with every revolution, which could bring it to speeds of 21 knots “with only five boilers in use.” An article published Aug. 13, 1932, reported that the Manhattan carried three stowaways — “Arnold Ronner, 19, of Hartford, and Steve Bohnensteuger, 22, of Manheim, Germany …, and Charles Lake, 21, of Clinton, Iowa, farmer boy, in the first class hold” — and that there was a “thé-dansant on the veranda deck” that afternoon. Photo: The New York Times
June 3, 1933: A drydock inspection of one of the S.S. Manhattan’s propellers in Brooklyn, claimed by the caption to drive the ship two feet forward with every revolution, which could bring it to speeds of 21 knots “with only five boilers in use.” An article published Aug. 13, 1932, reported that the Manhattan carried three stowaways — “Arnold Ronner, 19, of Hartford, and Steve Bohnensteuger, 22, of Manheim, Germany …, and Charles Lake, 21, of Clinton, Iowa, farmer boy, in the first class hold” — and that there was a “thé-dansant on the veranda deck” that afternoon. Photo: The New York Times

June 3, 1933: A drydock inspection of one of the S.S. Manhattan’s propellers in Brooklyn, claimed by the caption to drive the ship two feet forward with every revolution, which could bring it to speeds of 21 knots “with only five boilers in use.” An article published Aug. 13, 1932, reported that the Manhattan carried three stowaways — “Arnold Ronner, 19, of Hartford, and Steve Bohnensteuger, 22, of Manheim, Germany …, and Charles Lake, 21, of Clinton, Iowa, farmer boy, in the first class hold” — and that there was a “thé-dansant on the veranda deck” that afternoon. Photo: The New York Times

March 10, 1933: Finally, a “fool-proof hover plane,” which, the back of the photo explained, would revolutionize “air transport, since it can take off vertically from the ground and descend in like manner.” Its inventors added that it could “hover or fly backwards at will.” Whose will, it didn’t say, raising the specter of a very frightening giant mechanical dragonfly indeed. Photo: The New York Times
March 10, 1933: Finally, a “fool-proof hover plane,” which, the back of the photo explained, would revolutionize “air transport, since it can take off vertically from the ground and descend in like manner.” Its inventors added that it could “hover or fly backwards at will.” Whose will, it didn’t say, raising the specter of a very frightening giant mechanical dragonfly indeed. Photo: The New York Times

March 10, 1933: Finally, a “fool-proof hover plane,” which, the back of the photo explained, would revolutionize “air transport, since it can take off vertically from the ground and descend in like manner.” Its inventors added that it could “hover or fly backwards at will.” Whose will, it didn’t say, raising the specter of a very frightening giant mechanical dragonfly indeed. Photo: The New York Times

April 2, 1933: According to some paste-on scholarship on the back of this photo, the French engineer Joseph Archer devoted 11 years to perfecting his propellered  “airline cab,” which was intended to scoot along at 150 miles per hour, suspended from an overhead monorail. Repeated fruitless Google and Times archive searches suggest that Mr. Archer’s invention was not a pedestal-smashing success, nor was his work on a trench mortar as legacy-making as it seemed at the time of this photo’s issue. A side view of the cab can be found here. Photo: The New York Times
April 2, 1933: According to some paste-on scholarship on the back of this photo, the French engineer Joseph Archer devoted 11 years to perfecting his propellered  “airline cab,” which was intended to scoot along at 150 miles per hour, suspended from an overhead monorail. Repeated fruitless Google and Times archive searches suggest that Mr. Archer’s invention was not a pedestal-smashing success, nor was his work on a trench mortar as legacy-making as it seemed at the time of this photo’s issue. A side view of the cab can be found here. Photo: The New York Times

April 2, 1933: According to some paste-on scholarship on the back of this photo, the French engineer Joseph Archer devoted 11 years to perfecting his propellered  “airline cab,” which was intended to scoot along at 150 miles per hour, suspended from an overhead monorail. Repeated fruitless Google and Times archive searches suggest that Mr. Archer’s invention was not a pedestal-smashing success, nor was his work on a trench mortar as legacy-making as it seemed at the time of this photo’s issue. A side view of the cab can be found here. Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 11, 1933: “Taking Advantage of a Winter Sport in New York,” children in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, sledded down the Long Meadow’s slopes right into a column in the day’s paper that reported a $43 million increase in the state budget, to cover costs like a liquor control board (thanks to the recent Prohibition repeal) or the rising population of prison inmates. Photo: The New York Times
Dec. 11, 1933: “Taking Advantage of a Winter Sport in New York,” children in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, sledded down the Long Meadow’s slopes right into a column in the day’s paper that reported a $43 million increase in the state budget, to cover costs like a liquor control board (thanks to the recent Prohibition repeal) or the rising population of prison inmates. Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 11, 1933: “Taking Advantage of a Winter Sport in New York,” children in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, sledded down the Long Meadow’s slopes right into a column in the day’s paper that reported a $43 million increase in the state budget, to cover costs like a liquor control board (thanks to the recent Prohibition repeal) or the rising population of prison inmates. Photo: The New York Times

Jan. 30, 1936: An all-too-familiar story: A cold wave in New York abated somewhat when temperatures climbed to 22 degrees, the warmest it had been in eight days. Long before the phrase “polar vortex” had entered common parlance, The Times reported that though “yesterday’s temperatures were higher than on the preceding seven days, they never went above the freezing point and were of no help to the 30,591 men who continued to try to clear the corrugated crust of ice from the streets,” like these men on Madison Avenue at 60th Street. Photo: The New York Times
Jan. 30, 1936: An all-too-familiar story: A cold wave in New York abated somewhat when temperatures climbed to 22 degrees, the warmest it had been in eight days. Long before the phrase “polar vortex” had entered common parlance, The Times reported that though “yesterday’s temperatures were higher than on the preceding seven days, they never went above the freezing point and were of no help to the 30,591 men who continued to try to clear the corrugated crust of ice from the streets,” like these men on Madison Avenue at 60th Street. Photo: The New York Times

Jan. 30, 1936: An all-too-familiar story: A cold wave in New York abated somewhat when temperatures climbed to 22 degrees, the warmest it had been in eight days. Long before the phrase “polar vortex” had entered common parlance, The Times reported that though “yesterday’s temperatures were higher than on the preceding seven days, they never went above the freezing point and were of no help to the 30,591 men who continued to try to clear the corrugated crust of ice from the streets,” like these men on Madison Avenue at 60th Street. Photo: The New York Times

Aug. 12, 1935: From the Cleveland bureau, the winner of an “elimination heat” crossed the finish line at the National Soap Box Derby in Akron, Ohio. A crash of one of the soap boxes into the judges’ stand later that day injured three, none seriously, however. Maurice E. Bales, 13, from Indiana, won the derby, and officials noted that “25 persons were overcome by the heat during the spectacle.” Mr. Bales won a four-year scholarship to any state university in the country, a trophy and a “midget racer.” Photo: The New York Times
Aug. 12, 1935: From the Cleveland bureau, the winner of an “elimination heat” crossed the finish line at the National Soap Box Derby in Akron, Ohio. A crash of one of the soap boxes into the judges’ stand later that day injured three, none seriously, however. Maurice E. Bales, 13, from Indiana, won the derby, and officials noted that “25 persons were overcome by the heat during the spectacle.” Mr. Bales won a four-year scholarship to any state university in the country, a trophy and a “midget racer.” Photo: The New York Times

Aug. 12, 1935: From the Cleveland bureau, the winner of an “elimination heat” crossed the finish line at the National Soap Box Derby in Akron, Ohio. A crash of one of the soap boxes into the judges’ stand later that day injured three, none seriously, however. Maurice E. Bales, 13, from Indiana, won the derby, and officials noted that “25 persons were overcome by the heat during the spectacle.” Mr. Bales won a four-year scholarship to any state university in the country, a trophy and a “midget racer.” Photo: The New York Times

Aug. 3, 1935: “First Aid for the lifeguard’s beauty and romance.” From the  Mid-Week Pictorial, the young buck Derwood Brough, at a beach in Rochester, sported a “soft leather nose guard which he devised after his girlfriend had announced she would not go out with him if his nose became cherry red.” The caption did not say whether she would also not go out with him if he wore the soft leather nose guard. Photo: The New York Times
Aug. 3, 1935: “First Aid for the lifeguard’s beauty and romance.” From the  Mid-Week Pictorial, the young buck Derwood Brough, at a beach in Rochester, sported a “soft leather nose guard which he devised after his girlfriend had announced she would not go out with him if his nose became cherry red.” The caption did not say whether she would also not go out with him if he wore the soft leather nose guard. Photo: The New York Times

Aug. 3, 1935: “First Aid for the lifeguard’s beauty and romance.” From the  Mid-Week Pictorial, the young buck Derwood Brough, at a beach in Rochester, sported a “soft leather nose guard which he devised after his girlfriend had announced she would not go out with him if his nose became cherry red.” The caption did not say whether she would also not go out with him if he wore the soft leather nose guard. Photo: The New York Times