The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1930s
“Hope Bubbles in Champagne’s Province,” read the headline from the paper of Nov. 26, 1933. Just a couple of weeks before the 21st Amendment repealing prohibition was ratified, French vinters were looking to open up an old market in the United States. “No group has more breathlessly awaited the outcome of the American prohibition battle than the champagne growers of France,” The Times reported. Photo: The New York Times
“Hope Bubbles in Champagne’s Province,” read the headline from the paper of Nov. 26, 1933. Just a couple of weeks before the 21st Amendment repealing prohibition was ratified, French vinters were looking to open up an old market in the United States. “No group has more breathlessly awaited the outcome of the American prohibition battle than the champagne growers of France,” The Times reported. Photo: The New York Times

“Hope Bubbles in Champagne’s Province,” read the headline from the paper of Nov. 26, 1933. Just a couple of weeks before the 21st Amendment repealing prohibition was ratified, French vinters were looking to open up an old market in the United States. “No group has more breathlessly awaited the outcome of the American prohibition battle than the champagne growers of France,” The Times reported. Photo: The New York Times

March 25, 1934: Inspired by the newfangled contraptions of the era, Andre Perugia unveiled some of his latest shoe designs: “Evening Oxford With Airplane Wire Heel; a Mule With Organ Pipe Heel, and a Sandal With a Machine Age Heel of Metal Balls.” Elsewhere in that Sunday’s “Rotogravure Picture Section in Two Parts” (beginning on page 103): signs of spring; a scowling Princess Margaret Rose of York; the pouring of 100 tons of molten glass for a mirror; and a “new plane with wings like a saucer: the ‘circle plane.’ ” Photo: The New York Times
March 25, 1934: Inspired by the newfangled contraptions of the era, Andre Perugia unveiled some of his latest shoe designs: “Evening Oxford With Airplane Wire Heel; a Mule With Organ Pipe Heel, and a Sandal With a Machine Age Heel of Metal Balls.” Elsewhere in that Sunday’s “Rotogravure Picture Section in Two Parts” (beginning on page 103): signs of spring; a scowling Princess Margaret Rose of York; the pouring of 100 tons of molten glass for a mirror; and a “new plane with wings like a saucer: the ‘circle plane.’ ” Photo: The New York Times

March 25, 1934: Inspired by the newfangled contraptions of the era, Andre Perugia unveiled some of his latest shoe designs: “Evening Oxford With Airplane Wire Heel; a Mule With Organ Pipe Heel, and a Sandal With a Machine Age Heel of Metal Balls.” Elsewhere in that Sunday’s “Rotogravure Picture Section in Two Parts” (beginning on page 103): signs of spring; a scowling Princess Margaret Rose of York; the pouring of 100 tons of molten glass for a mirror; and a “new plane with wings like a saucer: the ‘circle plane.’ ” Photo: The New York Times

April 22, 1938: The original Seabiscuit, with his trainer Tom Smith, second from right, and his owner, Charles S. Howard, right, on his way to race War Admiral, a horse who, though a year younger than Seabiscuit, was both Seabiscuit’s uncle and chief rival. (Man o’ War was Seabiscuit’s grandfather and War Admiral’s father.) The match was eventually held in November, the only time they actually raced each other, and Seabiscuit, “the phlegmatic ugly duckling with the lame leg from the Pacific Coast” beat War Admiral with a record-breaking run. Photo: The New York Times
April 22, 1938: The original Seabiscuit, with his trainer Tom Smith, second from right, and his owner, Charles S. Howard, right, on his way to race War Admiral, a horse who, though a year younger than Seabiscuit, was both Seabiscuit’s uncle and chief rival. (Man o’ War was Seabiscuit’s grandfather and War Admiral’s father.) The match was eventually held in November, the only time they actually raced each other, and Seabiscuit, “the phlegmatic ugly duckling with the lame leg from the Pacific Coast” beat War Admiral with a record-breaking run. Photo: The New York Times

April 22, 1938: The original Seabiscuit, with his trainer Tom Smith, second from right, and his owner, Charles S. Howard, right, on his way to race War Admiral, a horse who, though a year younger than Seabiscuit, was both Seabiscuit’s uncle and chief rival. (Man o’ War was Seabiscuit’s grandfather and War Admiral’s father.) The match was eventually held in November, the only time they actually raced each other, and Seabiscuit, “the phlegmatic ugly duckling with the lame leg from the Pacific Coast” beat War Admiral with a record-breaking run. Photo: The New York Times

April 7, 1934: At the Aintree Racecourse near Liverpool, England, the Becher’s Brook fence is a formidable obstacle to any horse-jockey duo seeking glory at the Grand National (scenes from that competition are here, on Page 17). So formidable, in fact, that the fence terrifies the animals, who act erratically before the race, including the heavy-betting favorite of 2012, Synchronised, who died in that year’s Grand National. That death and later ones reignited debate and concern that the race’s dangers might “lead Parliament to ban it as it did, in time, with bearbaiting, dog-coursing and fox hunting.” Photo: The New York Times
April 7, 1934: At the Aintree Racecourse near Liverpool, England, the Becher’s Brook fence is a formidable obstacle to any horse-jockey duo seeking glory at the Grand National (scenes from that competition are here, on Page 17). So formidable, in fact, that the fence terrifies the animals, who act erratically before the race, including the heavy-betting favorite of 2012, Synchronised, who died in that year’s Grand National. That death and later ones reignited debate and concern that the race’s dangers might “lead Parliament to ban it as it did, in time, with bearbaiting, dog-coursing and fox hunting.” Photo: The New York Times

April 7, 1934: At the Aintree Racecourse near Liverpool, England, the Becher’s Brook fence is a formidable obstacle to any horse-jockey duo seeking glory at the Grand National (scenes from that competition are here, on Page 17). So formidable, in fact, that the fence terrifies the animals, who act erratically before the race, including the heavy-betting favorite of 2012, Synchronised, who died in that year’s Grand National. That death and later ones reignited debate and concern that the race’s dangers might “lead Parliament to ban it as it did, in time, with bearbaiting, dog-coursing and fox hunting.” Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 6, 1930: Wild horses, some “ready for the saddle,” 1,500 strong, were brought to Dublin Canyon, Calif., to be sold. A note on the picture’s back observes that “Will James could write several books on the different personalities of this group.” Mr. James was a popular author and illustrator of cowboy tales, including one about his own origins: that he was born “on a wagon in Montana or Wyoming,” orphaned, then raised by a French-Canadian trapper. (In fact, his given name was Joseph Ernest Nephtali Dufault and he was born in Saint-Nazaire-d’Acton, in Quebec.) Photo: The New York Times
Dec. 6, 1930: Wild horses, some “ready for the saddle,” 1,500 strong, were brought to Dublin Canyon, Calif., to be sold. A note on the picture’s back observes that “Will James could write several books on the different personalities of this group.” Mr. James was a popular author and illustrator of cowboy tales, including one about his own origins: that he was born “on a wagon in Montana or Wyoming,” orphaned, then raised by a French-Canadian trapper. (In fact, his given name was Joseph Ernest Nephtali Dufault and he was born in Saint-Nazaire-d’Acton, in Quebec.) Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 6, 1930: Wild horses, some “ready for the saddle,” 1,500 strong, were brought to Dublin Canyon, Calif., to be sold. A note on the picture’s back observes that “Will James could write several books on the different personalities of this group.” Mr. James was a popular author and illustrator of cowboy tales, including one about his own origins: that he was born “on a wagon in Montana or Wyoming,” orphaned, then raised by a French-Canadian trapper. (In fact, his given name was Joseph Ernest Nephtali Dufault and he was born in Saint-Nazaire-d’Acton, in Quebec.) Photo: The New York Times

Aug. 9, 1930: In Castellane, southern France, about a hundred miles from the Italian border, a herd of sheep sought ground suitable for grazing. Earlier that year, Premier Benito Mussolini of Italy made his own references to sheep in the area, The Times reported. “Down with France!” was the crowd’s chant during a speech in which the premier explained that he was rousing his people from stupefaction, “the bleatings of foreign wolves in sheep’s clothing.” Photo: The New York Times
Aug. 9, 1930: In Castellane, southern France, about a hundred miles from the Italian border, a herd of sheep sought ground suitable for grazing. Earlier that year, Premier Benito Mussolini of Italy made his own references to sheep in the area, The Times reported. “Down with France!” was the crowd’s chant during a speech in which the premier explained that he was rousing his people from stupefaction, “the bleatings of foreign wolves in sheep’s clothing.” Photo: The New York Times

Aug. 9, 1930: In Castellane, southern France, about a hundred miles from the Italian border, a herd of sheep sought ground suitable for grazing. Earlier that year, Premier Benito Mussolini of Italy made his own references to sheep in the area, The Times reported. “Down with France!” was the crowd’s chant during a speech in which the premier explained that he was rousing his people from stupefaction, “the bleatings of foreign wolves in sheep’s clothing.” Photo: The New York Times

In October 1933, 6,000 Boy Scouts descended on Long Island in what was the largest of an annual pilgrimage to the grave of Theodore Roosevelt. Held every year since the president’s death in 1919, the event was to commemorate his birthday. This time, the “veteran National Scout Commander” Daniel Carter Beard, at the age of 86, led the mile-and-a-half walk to the site in Oyster Bay. Photo: The New York Times
In October 1933, 6,000 Boy Scouts descended on Long Island in what was the largest of an annual pilgrimage to the grave of Theodore Roosevelt. Held every year since the president’s death in 1919, the event was to commemorate his birthday. This time, the “veteran National Scout Commander” Daniel Carter Beard, at the age of 86, led the mile-and-a-half walk to the site in Oyster Bay. Photo: The New York Times

In October 1933, 6,000 Boy Scouts descended on Long Island in what was the largest of an annual pilgrimage to the grave of Theodore Roosevelt. Held every year since the president’s death in 1919, the event was to commemorate his birthday. This time, the “veteran National Scout Commander” Daniel Carter Beard, at the age of 86, led the mile-and-a-half walk to the site in Oyster Bay. Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 14, 1931: “She rivals the best of the masculine speedboat racers,” the picture’s caption reads. Loretta Turnbull of Monrovia, Calif., won “fifty trophies, forty-five of which were won in competition with men.” A few years later, when she received kidnapping threats at her home, her father, Rupert, boasted of the family’s prowess with guns. “Mr. Turnbull said he was turning his ranch into an armed camp,” The Times reported. “Loretta and her three brothers,” Mr. Turnbull was quoted as saying, “were all taught the use of firearms and how to shoot straight and rapidly. We feel that we are able to take care of ourselves.” Photo: The New York Times
Feb. 14, 1931: “She rivals the best of the masculine speedboat racers,” the picture’s caption reads. Loretta Turnbull of Monrovia, Calif., won “fifty trophies, forty-five of which were won in competition with men.” A few years later, when she received kidnapping threats at her home, her father, Rupert, boasted of the family’s prowess with guns. “Mr. Turnbull said he was turning his ranch into an armed camp,” The Times reported. “Loretta and her three brothers,” Mr. Turnbull was quoted as saying, “were all taught the use of firearms and how to shoot straight and rapidly. We feel that we are able to take care of ourselves.” Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 14, 1931: “She rivals the best of the masculine speedboat racers,” the picture’s caption reads. Loretta Turnbull of Monrovia, Calif., won “fifty trophies, forty-five of which were won in competition with men.” A few years later, when she received kidnapping threats at her home, her father, Rupert, boasted of the family’s prowess with guns. “Mr. Turnbull said he was turning his ranch into an armed camp,” The Times reported. “Loretta and her three brothers,” Mr. Turnbull was quoted as saying, “were all taught the use of firearms and how to shoot straight and rapidly. We feel that we are able to take care of ourselves.” Photo: The New York Times