The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1920s
Feb. 24, 1924: “Skims over the drifts like a bird”: A big sled outfitted with propellers and skis, devised by the aptly named Wing Brothers of St. Ignace, Mich., is the sort of thing that would have saved Atlanta and other parts of the South from their crippling January weather-induced traffic jams — the sort of thing that we may all start looking to acquire soon, as this winter seems as if it will never end. Other examples of propeller-driven sleds can be found here and here. Photo: The New York Times
Feb. 24, 1924: “Skims over the drifts like a bird”: A big sled outfitted with propellers and skis, devised by the aptly named Wing Brothers of St. Ignace, Mich., is the sort of thing that would have saved Atlanta and other parts of the South from their crippling January weather-induced traffic jams — the sort of thing that we may all start looking to acquire soon, as this winter seems as if it will never end. Other examples of propeller-driven sleds can be found here and here. Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 24, 1924: “Skims over the drifts like a bird”: A big sled outfitted with propellers and skis, devised by the aptly named Wing Brothers of St. Ignace, Mich., is the sort of thing that would have saved Atlanta and other parts of the South from their crippling January weather-induced traffic jams — the sort of thing that we may all start looking to acquire soon, as this winter seems as if it will never end. Other examples of propeller-driven sleds can be found here and here. Photo: The New York Times

June 27, 1926: F. S. Townsley, chief ranger, officially handed a permit to Guz Petzel, allowing him to drive his “four-cylinder, home-made product” through Yosemite National Park — the smallest automobile to enter it. But it was a harbinger of bigger things: “Nature lovers, old-timers” and their allies had been working to keep a road out of the Yosemite Valley. As The Times reported a few weeks later, a new road built by convicts was opened, “so broad and level that it brings the valley within seven or eight hours of easy driving from the Golden Gate.” Officials expected a ten-fold increase of visitors to the park. Photo: The New York Times
June 27, 1926: F. S. Townsley, chief ranger, officially handed a permit to Guz Petzel, allowing him to drive his “four-cylinder, home-made product” through Yosemite National Park — the smallest automobile to enter it. But it was a harbinger of bigger things: “Nature lovers, old-timers” and their allies had been working to keep a road out of the Yosemite Valley. As The Times reported a few weeks later, a new road built by convicts was opened, “so broad and level that it brings the valley within seven or eight hours of easy driving from the Golden Gate.” Officials expected a ten-fold increase of visitors to the park. Photo: The New York Times

June 27, 1926: F. S. Townsley, chief ranger, officially handed a permit to Guz Petzel, allowing him to drive his “four-cylinder, home-made product” through Yosemite National Park — the smallest automobile to enter it. But it was a harbinger of bigger things: “Nature lovers, old-timers” and their allies had been working to keep a road out of the Yosemite Valley. As The Times reported a few weeks later, a new road built by convicts was opened, “so broad and level that it brings the valley within seven or eight hours of easy driving from the Golden Gate.” Officials expected a ten-fold increase of visitors to the park. Photo: The New York Times

Nov. 26, 1925: A friendly “bruin,” the Old English term for brown bears (though it appears as though this one might actually be a black bear), “knows that the good things to eat” are along the tourist routes in the Rockies of British Columbia. Coincidentally, Nov. 26, 1925, was that year’s Thanksgiving, on which the Chicago Bears played against the Chicago Cardinals at Wrigley Field. The football game ended in a 0-0 tie. Photo: The New York Times
Nov. 26, 1925: A friendly “bruin,” the Old English term for brown bears (though it appears as though this one might actually be a black bear), “knows that the good things to eat” are along the tourist routes in the Rockies of British Columbia. Coincidentally, Nov. 26, 1925, was that year’s Thanksgiving, on which the Chicago Bears played against the Chicago Cardinals at Wrigley Field. The football game ended in a 0-0 tie. Photo: The New York Times

Nov. 26, 1925: A friendly “bruin,” the Old English term for brown bears (though it appears as though this one might actually be a black bear), “knows that the good things to eat” are along the tourist routes in the Rockies of British Columbia. Coincidentally, Nov. 26, 1925, was that year’s Thanksgiving, on which the Chicago Bears played against the Chicago Cardinals at Wrigley Field. The football game ended in a 0-0 tie. Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 20, 1924: From the Mid-Week Pictorial, “A Bare Possibility of Coming Trouble,” a young bear appeared ready to disarm young Ernest in Buck Hill Falls, Pa. The handwritten admonition, in pencil on the back of the photo, serves as a warning to this “youthful nimrod” and others “who steal their father’s guns and hunting toys to go out after big game. Sometimes the game is closer at hand than they suspect.” Photo: The New York Times
Dec. 20, 1924: From the Mid-Week Pictorial, “A Bare Possibility of Coming Trouble,” a young bear appeared ready to disarm young Ernest in Buck Hill Falls, Pa. The handwritten admonition, in pencil on the back of the photo, serves as a warning to this “youthful nimrod” and others “who steal their father’s guns and hunting toys to go out after big game. Sometimes the game is closer at hand than they suspect.” Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 20, 1924: From the Mid-Week Pictorial, “A Bare Possibility of Coming Trouble,” a young bear appeared ready to disarm young Ernest in Buck Hill Falls, Pa. The handwritten admonition, in pencil on the back of the photo, serves as a warning to this “youthful nimrod” and others “who steal their father’s guns and hunting toys to go out after big game. Sometimes the game is closer at hand than they suspect.” Photo: The New York Times

In an undated photo, probably circa 1921, the 19-year-old wing-walker Lillian Boyer performed “the most daring aerial feats said to have been undertaken by one of her sex in the history of aerial thrills” — a history she must have had more than a modest hand in making, performing hundreds of stunts and jumps until federal law prohibited such low-flying planes in 1929. She died of natural, non-plane-related causes 60 years later. Photo: The New York Times
In an undated photo, probably circa 1921, the 19-year-old wing-walker Lillian Boyer performed “the most daring aerial feats said to have been undertaken by one of her sex in the history of aerial thrills” — a history she must have had more than a modest hand in making, performing hundreds of stunts and jumps until federal law prohibited such low-flying planes in 1929. She died of natural, non-plane-related causes 60 years later. Photo: The New York Times

In an undated photo, probably circa 1921, the 19-year-old wing-walker Lillian Boyer performed “the most daring aerial feats said to have been undertaken by one of her sex in the history of aerial thrills” — a history she must have had more than a modest hand in making, performing hundreds of stunts and jumps until federal law prohibited such low-flying planes in 1929. She died of natural, non-plane-related causes 60 years later. Photo: The New York Times

A standalone photo spread from Feb. 10, 1924 —  which also included images of the tightrope walker Bird Millman traversing the air above Broadway, parasol in hand — showed a fisherman catching a bass on the Hillsborough River in Tampa, Fla., in gloriously un-February-like weather. Photo: The New York Times
A standalone photo spread from Feb. 10, 1924 —  which also included images of the tightrope walker Bird Millman traversing the air above Broadway, parasol in hand — showed a fisherman catching a bass on the Hillsborough River in Tampa, Fla., in gloriously un-February-like weather. Photo: The New York Times

A standalone photo spread from Feb. 10, 1924 —  which also included images of the tightrope walker Bird Millman traversing the air above Broadway, parasol in hand — showed a fisherman catching a bass on the Hillsborough River in Tampa, Fla., in gloriously un-February-like weather. Photo: The New York Times

Nov. 5, 1927: Giacomo Lauri-Volpi in a lavish costume (read a related Lens post) as Pollione in “Norma,” an opera by Vincenzo Bellini, in which Pollione grows tired of his wife, Norma, and takes a lover. Norma finds out, is upset, contemplates infanticide, then offers the children to the lover, who refuses. The adults all talk it over, and by the end, both Norma and Pollione are in love with each other again and have offered themselves to burn in a funeral pyre. Norma is considered one of the harder soprano parts to sing. Photo: The New York Times
Nov. 5, 1927: Giacomo Lauri-Volpi in a lavish costume (read a related Lens post) as Pollione in “Norma,” an opera by Vincenzo Bellini, in which Pollione grows tired of his wife, Norma, and takes a lover. Norma finds out, is upset, contemplates infanticide, then offers the children to the lover, who refuses. The adults all talk it over, and by the end, both Norma and Pollione are in love with each other again and have offered themselves to burn in a funeral pyre. Norma is considered one of the harder soprano parts to sing. Photo: The New York Times

Nov. 5, 1927: Giacomo Lauri-Volpi in a lavish costume (read a related Lens post) as Pollione in “Norma,” an opera by Vincenzo Bellini, in which Pollione grows tired of his wife, Norma, and takes a lover. Norma finds out, is upset, contemplates infanticide, then offers the children to the lover, who refuses. The adults all talk it over, and by the end, both Norma and Pollione are in love with each other again and have offered themselves to burn in a funeral pyre. Norma is considered one of the harder soprano parts to sing. Photo: The New York Times

“Mrs. Marshall Field with the pelt of a jaguar.” An article published Sept. 15, 1926, recounted Mrs. Field’s three months in Brazil, financed by her husband. The expedition was headed by George K. Cherrie, an ornithologist at the Field Museum in Chicago, who accompanied President Theodore Roosevelt on his 1913-14 voyage down the River of Doubt. There is a related post on the Lens blog. Photo: The New York Times
“Mrs. Marshall Field with the pelt of a jaguar.” An article published Sept. 15, 1926, recounted Mrs. Field’s three months in Brazil, financed by her husband. The expedition was headed by George K. Cherrie, an ornithologist at the Field Museum in Chicago, who accompanied President Theodore Roosevelt on his 1913-14 voyage down the River of Doubt. There is a related post on the Lens blog. Photo: The New York Times

“Mrs. Marshall Field with the pelt of a jaguar.” An article published Sept. 15, 1926, recounted Mrs. Field’s three months in Brazil, financed by her husband. The expedition was headed by George K. Cherrie, an ornithologist at the Field Museum in Chicago, who accompanied President Theodore Roosevelt on his 1913-14 voyage down the River of Doubt. There is a related post on the Lens blog. Photo: The New York Times

A photo spread from 1924 showed the adventures of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Morden of Chicago hunting tigers in India and Nepal. Perhaps not as sensitively as it could have, a caption described “a free ride for a big cat: helpers of the Morden party bringing in one of the victims aboard an elephant.” Photo: The New York Times
A photo spread from 1924 showed the adventures of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Morden of Chicago hunting tigers in India and Nepal. Perhaps not as sensitively as it could have, a caption described “a free ride for a big cat: helpers of the Morden party bringing in one of the victims aboard an elephant.” Photo: The New York Times

A photo spread from 1924 showed the adventures of Mr. and Mrs. J. W. Morden of Chicago hunting tigers in India and Nepal. Perhaps not as sensitively as it could have, a caption described “a free ride for a big cat: helpers of the Morden party bringing in one of the victims aboard an elephant.” Photo: The New York Times