The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1920s
March 27, 1921: Contents under pressure — a Weimar-era advertising gimmick put unemployed soldiers to work extolling the virtues of German champagne. Years later, in The Times Magazine, Stephen Spender recalled youthful days in Berlin toward the end of the 1920s. “We saw Berlin as a tremendous phenomenon, but not as the cultural center of the then contemporary Europe,” he wrote. “In fact, I doubt whether Berlin could ever be the center of anything, even of Germany: It is a kind of off-center, just as New York is off-center to the United States.” Photo: The New York Times
March 27, 1921: Contents under pressure — a Weimar-era advertising gimmick put unemployed soldiers to work extolling the virtues of German champagne. Years later, in The Times Magazine, Stephen Spender recalled youthful days in Berlin toward the end of the 1920s. “We saw Berlin as a tremendous phenomenon, but not as the cultural center of the then contemporary Europe,” he wrote. “In fact, I doubt whether Berlin could ever be the center of anything, even of Germany: It is a kind of off-center, just as New York is off-center to the United States.” Photo: The New York Times

March 27, 1921: Contents under pressure — a Weimar-era advertising gimmick put unemployed soldiers to work extolling the virtues of German champagne. Years later, in The Times Magazine, Stephen Spender recalled youthful days in Berlin toward the end of the 1920s. “We saw Berlin as a tremendous phenomenon, but not as the cultural center of the then contemporary Europe,” he wrote. “In fact, I doubt whether Berlin could ever be the center of anything, even of Germany: It is a kind of off-center, just as New York is off-center to the United States.” Photo: The New York Times

Nov. 28, 1923: Liquor and beers were examined by J. W. Quillen, the Bureau of Internal Revenue’s chief chemist, who determined that only two of the thousands of bottles in this warehouse weren’t terrible moonshine counterfeits. Three years later, Mr. Quillen was quoted in The New York Times warning against future deaths from poisonous alcohol. At the time, the government had taken up the practice of denaturing alcohol in order to prevent its being bootlegged. Nevertheless, bootleggers sought to “renature” alcohol, and weird elixirs started finding their way into beverages and killing people. “The Government, according to the chemist, formerly used in denaturing a formula known as No. 6, which was believed to be deadly,” reported The Times. “Very recently, Mr. Quillen said, he has been receiving samples of beverages which contain wood alcohol, and no bootlegger has yet been able to get rid of the poison in that.” Photo: The New York Times
Nov. 28, 1923: Liquor and beers were examined by J. W. Quillen, the Bureau of Internal Revenue’s chief chemist, who determined that only two of the thousands of bottles in this warehouse weren’t terrible moonshine counterfeits. Three years later, Mr. Quillen was quoted in The New York Times warning against future deaths from poisonous alcohol. At the time, the government had taken up the practice of denaturing alcohol in order to prevent its being bootlegged. Nevertheless, bootleggers sought to “renature” alcohol, and weird elixirs started finding their way into beverages and killing people. “The Government, according to the chemist, formerly used in denaturing a formula known as No. 6, which was believed to be deadly,” reported The Times. “Very recently, Mr. Quillen said, he has been receiving samples of beverages which contain wood alcohol, and no bootlegger has yet been able to get rid of the poison in that.” Photo: The New York Times

Nov. 28, 1923: Liquor and beers were examined by J. W. Quillen, the Bureau of Internal Revenue’s chief chemist, who determined that only two of the thousands of bottles in this warehouse weren’t terrible moonshine counterfeits. Three years later, Mr. Quillen was quoted in The New York Times warning against future deaths from poisonous alcohol. At the time, the government had taken up the practice of denaturing alcohol in order to prevent its being bootlegged. Nevertheless, bootleggers sought to “renature” alcohol, and weird elixirs started finding their way into beverages and killing people. “The Government, according to the chemist, formerly used in denaturing a formula known as No. 6, which was believed to be deadly,” reported The Times. “Very recently, Mr. Quillen said, he has been receiving samples of beverages which contain wood alcohol, and no bootlegger has yet been able to get rid of the poison in that.” Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 1, 1923: The French actress Mistinguett, née Jeanne Florentine Bourgeois, photographed at home in Paris with her hundreds of fine shoes and blurry pet monkey. She had a certain flair for things ostentatious and dramatic, having reportedly had her famous legs insured in 1919 for 500,000 francs, and, according to The New York Times, challenging strangers who jostled her. “Mlle. Mistinguett, France’s most popular music hall artist, may fight a duel one day soon,” a special cable to The Times reported. “She slapped a man’s face the other other evening and his wife is demanding reparation. Meanwhile Mistinguett is practicing with both pistols and foils so that she may be ready.” Photo: The New York Times
Dec. 1, 1923: The French actress Mistinguett, née Jeanne Florentine Bourgeois, photographed at home in Paris with her hundreds of fine shoes and blurry pet monkey. She had a certain flair for things ostentatious and dramatic, having reportedly had her famous legs insured in 1919 for 500,000 francs, and, according to The New York Times, challenging strangers who jostled her. “Mlle. Mistinguett, France’s most popular music hall artist, may fight a duel one day soon,” a special cable to The Times reported. “She slapped a man’s face the other other evening and his wife is demanding reparation. Meanwhile Mistinguett is practicing with both pistols and foils so that she may be ready.” Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 1, 1923: The French actress Mistinguett, née Jeanne Florentine Bourgeois, photographed at home in Paris with her hundreds of fine shoes and blurry pet monkey. She had a certain flair for things ostentatious and dramatic, having reportedly had her famous legs insured in 1919 for 500,000 francs, and, according to The New York Times, challenging strangers who jostled her. “Mlle. Mistinguett, France’s most popular music hall artist, may fight a duel one day soon,” a special cable to The Times reported. “She slapped a man’s face the other other evening and his wife is demanding reparation. Meanwhile Mistinguett is practicing with both pistols and foils so that she may be ready.” Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1928: Ray Keech of Atlantic City posed alongside his 36-cylinder triplex, with which he hoped to break the world’s land speed record. He succeeded on April 22, beating the record with a speed of 207.55 miles per hour at Daytona Beach, Fla. His record held till March 1929, when it was exceeded by Maj. H.O.D. Seagrave in his car, the Golden Arrow. Not long after, Mr. Keech was killed in a four-car accident during a race in Altoona, Pa., though he was posthumously declared the winner of the race and awarded $4,500. Photo: The New York Times
Feb. 18, 1928: Ray Keech of Atlantic City posed alongside his 36-cylinder triplex, with which he hoped to break the world’s land speed record. He succeeded on April 22, beating the record with a speed of 207.55 miles per hour at Daytona Beach, Fla. His record held till March 1929, when it was exceeded by Maj. H.O.D. Seagrave in his car, the Golden Arrow. Not long after, Mr. Keech was killed in a four-car accident during a race in Altoona, Pa., though he was posthumously declared the winner of the race and awarded $4,500. Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1928: Ray Keech of Atlantic City posed alongside his 36-cylinder triplex, with which he hoped to break the world’s land speed record. He succeeded on April 22, beating the record with a speed of 207.55 miles per hour at Daytona Beach, Fla. His record held till March 1929, when it was exceeded by Maj. H.O.D. Seagrave in his car, the Golden Arrow. Not long after, Mr. Keech was killed in a four-car accident during a race in Altoona, Pa., though he was posthumously declared the winner of the race and awarded $4,500. Photo: The New York Times

May 3, 1925: A standalone photo, in a spread that included pictures of the Noonans of Lawrence, Mass. (with their 13 children), ready for church, or a two-ton rhinoceros shot by the Duke of York, of some Keystone Cop-esque policemen in Central Park, riding two to a horse in a one-ring rodeo. Photo: The New York Times
May 3, 1925: A standalone photo, in a spread that included pictures of the Noonans of Lawrence, Mass. (with their 13 children), ready for church, or a two-ton rhinoceros shot by the Duke of York, of some Keystone Cop-esque policemen in Central Park, riding two to a horse in a one-ring rodeo. Photo: The New York Times

May 3, 1925: A standalone photo, in a spread that included pictures of the Noonans of Lawrence, Mass. (with their 13 children), ready for church, or a two-ton rhinoceros shot by the Duke of York, of some Keystone Cop-esque policemen in Central Park, riding two to a horse in a one-ring rodeo. Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 24, 1924: “Skims over the drifts like a bird”: A big sled outfitted with propellers and skis, devised by the aptly named Wing Brothers of St. Ignace, Mich., is the sort of thing that would have saved Atlanta and other parts of the South from their crippling January weather-induced traffic jams — the sort of thing that we may all start looking to acquire soon, as this winter seems as if it will never end. Other examples of propeller-driven sleds can be found here and here. Photo: The New York Times
Feb. 24, 1924: “Skims over the drifts like a bird”: A big sled outfitted with propellers and skis, devised by the aptly named Wing Brothers of St. Ignace, Mich., is the sort of thing that would have saved Atlanta and other parts of the South from their crippling January weather-induced traffic jams — the sort of thing that we may all start looking to acquire soon, as this winter seems as if it will never end. Other examples of propeller-driven sleds can be found here and here. Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 24, 1924: “Skims over the drifts like a bird”: A big sled outfitted with propellers and skis, devised by the aptly named Wing Brothers of St. Ignace, Mich., is the sort of thing that would have saved Atlanta and other parts of the South from their crippling January weather-induced traffic jams — the sort of thing that we may all start looking to acquire soon, as this winter seems as if it will never end. Other examples of propeller-driven sleds can be found here and here. Photo: The New York Times

June 27, 1926: F. S. Townsley, chief ranger, officially handed a permit to Guz Petzel, allowing him to drive his “four-cylinder, home-made product” through Yosemite National Park — the smallest automobile to enter it. But it was a harbinger of bigger things: “Nature lovers, old-timers” and their allies had been working to keep a road out of the Yosemite Valley. As The Times reported a few weeks later, a new road built by convicts was opened, “so broad and level that it brings the valley within seven or eight hours of easy driving from the Golden Gate.” Officials expected a ten-fold increase of visitors to the park. Photo: The New York Times
June 27, 1926: F. S. Townsley, chief ranger, officially handed a permit to Guz Petzel, allowing him to drive his “four-cylinder, home-made product” through Yosemite National Park — the smallest automobile to enter it. But it was a harbinger of bigger things: “Nature lovers, old-timers” and their allies had been working to keep a road out of the Yosemite Valley. As The Times reported a few weeks later, a new road built by convicts was opened, “so broad and level that it brings the valley within seven or eight hours of easy driving from the Golden Gate.” Officials expected a ten-fold increase of visitors to the park. Photo: The New York Times

June 27, 1926: F. S. Townsley, chief ranger, officially handed a permit to Guz Petzel, allowing him to drive his “four-cylinder, home-made product” through Yosemite National Park — the smallest automobile to enter it. But it was a harbinger of bigger things: “Nature lovers, old-timers” and their allies had been working to keep a road out of the Yosemite Valley. As The Times reported a few weeks later, a new road built by convicts was opened, “so broad and level that it brings the valley within seven or eight hours of easy driving from the Golden Gate.” Officials expected a ten-fold increase of visitors to the park. Photo: The New York Times

Nov. 26, 1925: A friendly “bruin,” the Old English term for brown bears (though it appears as though this one might actually be a black bear), “knows that the good things to eat” are along the tourist routes in the Rockies of British Columbia. Coincidentally, Nov. 26, 1925, was that year’s Thanksgiving, on which the Chicago Bears played against the Chicago Cardinals at Wrigley Field. The football game ended in a 0-0 tie. Photo: The New York Times
Nov. 26, 1925: A friendly “bruin,” the Old English term for brown bears (though it appears as though this one might actually be a black bear), “knows that the good things to eat” are along the tourist routes in the Rockies of British Columbia. Coincidentally, Nov. 26, 1925, was that year’s Thanksgiving, on which the Chicago Bears played against the Chicago Cardinals at Wrigley Field. The football game ended in a 0-0 tie. Photo: The New York Times

Nov. 26, 1925: A friendly “bruin,” the Old English term for brown bears (though it appears as though this one might actually be a black bear), “knows that the good things to eat” are along the tourist routes in the Rockies of British Columbia. Coincidentally, Nov. 26, 1925, was that year’s Thanksgiving, on which the Chicago Bears played against the Chicago Cardinals at Wrigley Field. The football game ended in a 0-0 tie. Photo: The New York Times