The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Tagged: 1910s
March 8, 1919: The statue of Bartolomeo Colleoni, a 15th-century Venetian military person of rank, was removed from Venice to prevent vandalism of it during Austria-Hungary’s advance on the Italian front during World War I. The statue was saved from the Austrians’ foul scribblings, but not, alas, from the pigeons of the Santi Giovanni e Paolo church, who rest on Colleoni’s bronze steed to this day. Photo: The New York Times
March 8, 1919: The statue of Bartolomeo Colleoni, a 15th-century Venetian military person of rank, was removed from Venice to prevent vandalism of it during Austria-Hungary’s advance on the Italian front during World War I. The statue was saved from the Austrians’ foul scribblings, but not, alas, from the pigeons of the Santi Giovanni e Paolo church, who rest on Colleoni’s bronze steed to this day. Photo: The New York Times

March 8, 1919: The statue of Bartolomeo Colleoni, a 15th-century Venetian military person of rank, was removed from Venice to prevent vandalism of it during Austria-Hungary’s advance on the Italian front during World War I. The statue was saved from the Austrians’ foul scribblings, but not, alas, from the pigeons of the Santi Giovanni e Paolo church, who rest on Colleoni’s bronze steed to this day. Photo: The New York Times

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos
A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos