The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

March 25, 1952: En route to the International Motor Sports show at the Grand Central Palace in Manhattan, Frazer L. W. Dougherty drove his Airphibian, an airplane that could be detached from its wings and tail to become an odd little car, down Grand Central Parkway. Mr. Dougherty was quoted in The Boston Globe as hoping to sell the Airphibian to the public soon. Meanwhile, in a preview of the auto show, The Times published a vision of the car of the future — “telescoping wheels for leapfrogging traffic,” a microphone for “yelling at drivers, pedestrians,” a “soda pop dispenser,” a bumper to protect the grill and a bumper to protect the grill bumper were among its features. Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times
March 25, 1952: En route to the International Motor Sports show at the Grand Central Palace in Manhattan, Frazer L. W. Dougherty drove his Airphibian, an airplane that could be detached from its wings and tail to become an odd little car, down Grand Central Parkway. Mr. Dougherty was quoted in The Boston Globe as hoping to sell the Airphibian to the public soon. Meanwhile, in a preview of the auto show, The Times published a vision of the car of the future — “telescoping wheels for leapfrogging traffic,” a microphone for “yelling at drivers, pedestrians,” a “soda pop dispenser,” a bumper to protect the grill and a bumper to protect the grill bumper were among its features. Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times

March 25, 1952: En route to the International Motor Sports show at the Grand Central Palace in Manhattan, Frazer L. W. Dougherty drove his Airphibian, an airplane that could be detached from its wings and tail to become an odd little car, down Grand Central Parkway. Mr. Dougherty was quoted in The Boston Globe as hoping to sell the Airphibian to the public soon. Meanwhile, in a preview of the auto show, The Times published a vision of the car of the future — “telescoping wheels for leapfrogging traffic,” a microphone for “yelling at drivers, pedestrians,” a “soda pop dispenser,” a bumper to protect the grill and a bumper to protect the grill bumper were among its features. Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1928: Ray Keech of Atlantic City posed alongside his 36-cylinder triplex, with which he hoped to break the world’s land speed record. He succeeded on April 22, beating the record with a speed of 207.55 miles per hour at Daytona Beach, Fla. His record held till March 1929, when it was exceeded by Maj. H.O.D. Seagrave in his car, the Golden Arrow. Not long after, Mr. Keech was killed in a four-car accident during a race in Altoona, Pa., though he was posthumously declared the winner of the race and awarded $4,500. Photo: The New York Times
Feb. 18, 1928: Ray Keech of Atlantic City posed alongside his 36-cylinder triplex, with which he hoped to break the world’s land speed record. He succeeded on April 22, beating the record with a speed of 207.55 miles per hour at Daytona Beach, Fla. His record held till March 1929, when it was exceeded by Maj. H.O.D. Seagrave in his car, the Golden Arrow. Not long after, Mr. Keech was killed in a four-car accident during a race in Altoona, Pa., though he was posthumously declared the winner of the race and awarded $4,500. Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1928: Ray Keech of Atlantic City posed alongside his 36-cylinder triplex, with which he hoped to break the world’s land speed record. He succeeded on April 22, beating the record with a speed of 207.55 miles per hour at Daytona Beach, Fla. His record held till March 1929, when it was exceeded by Maj. H.O.D. Seagrave in his car, the Golden Arrow. Not long after, Mr. Keech was killed in a four-car accident during a race in Altoona, Pa., though he was posthumously declared the winner of the race and awarded $4,500. Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 14, 1931: “She rivals the best of the masculine speedboat racers,” the picture’s caption reads. Loretta Turnbull of Monrovia, Calif., won “fifty trophies, forty-five of which were won in competition with men.” A few years later, when she received kidnapping threats at her home, her father, Rupert, boasted of the family’s prowess with guns. “Mr. Turnbull said he was turning his ranch into an armed camp,” The Times reported. “Loretta and her three brothers,” Mr. Turnbull was quoted as saying, “were all taught the use of firearms and how to shoot straight and rapidly. We feel that we are able to take care of ourselves.” Photo: The New York Times
Feb. 14, 1931: “She rivals the best of the masculine speedboat racers,” the picture’s caption reads. Loretta Turnbull of Monrovia, Calif., won “fifty trophies, forty-five of which were won in competition with men.” A few years later, when she received kidnapping threats at her home, her father, Rupert, boasted of the family’s prowess with guns. “Mr. Turnbull said he was turning his ranch into an armed camp,” The Times reported. “Loretta and her three brothers,” Mr. Turnbull was quoted as saying, “were all taught the use of firearms and how to shoot straight and rapidly. We feel that we are able to take care of ourselves.” Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 14, 1931: “She rivals the best of the masculine speedboat racers,” the picture’s caption reads. Loretta Turnbull of Monrovia, Calif., won “fifty trophies, forty-five of which were won in competition with men.” A few years later, when she received kidnapping threats at her home, her father, Rupert, boasted of the family’s prowess with guns. “Mr. Turnbull said he was turning his ranch into an armed camp,” The Times reported. “Loretta and her three brothers,” Mr. Turnbull was quoted as saying, “were all taught the use of firearms and how to shoot straight and rapidly. We feel that we are able to take care of ourselves.” Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times
Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times

A plainclothes police officer kept watch over rooftops in the Highbridge neighborhood of the Bronx on Nov. 25, 1969, in part of the coverage for a Dec. 24 article that reported on a special Police Department crime analysis, hoping to stem robberies. Though the report said that the victims were likely to be older and white, and that 80 percent of the “robbers, according to descriptions supplied by the victims, were Negroes or Puerto Ricans,” The Times quoted Capt. Salvatore Matteis, the 44th Precinct commander, as saying “This isn’t a matter of race; it’s a matter of economics.” Photo: Michael Evans/The New York Times
A plainclothes police officer kept watch over rooftops in the Highbridge neighborhood of the Bronx on Nov. 25, 1969, in part of the coverage for a Dec. 24 article that reported on a special Police Department crime analysis, hoping to stem robberies. Though the report said that the victims were likely to be older and white, and that 80 percent of the “robbers, according to descriptions supplied by the victims, were Negroes or Puerto Ricans,” The Times quoted Capt. Salvatore Matteis, the 44th Precinct commander, as saying “This isn’t a matter of race; it’s a matter of economics.” Photo: Michael Evans/The New York Times

A plainclothes police officer kept watch over rooftops in the Highbridge neighborhood of the Bronx on Nov. 25, 1969, in part of the coverage for a Dec. 24 article that reported on a special Police Department crime analysis, hoping to stem robberies. Though the report said that the victims were likely to be older and white, and that 80 percent of the “robbers, according to descriptions supplied by the victims, were Negroes or Puerto Ricans,” The Times quoted Capt. Salvatore Matteis, the 44th Precinct commander, as saying “This isn’t a matter of race; it’s a matter of economics.” Photo: Michael Evans/The New York Times

Police officers kept an eye on a Soviet navy training ship, the Druzhba, on Aug. 14, 1990. The unpublished photo was part of coverage for an Aug. 17 article that described the city’s police department “stretched thin by budget cuts and rising crime.” The commissioner was reported to be looking into whether or not officers were “overspecialized” and too “preoccupied with duties that distract them from their central mission of preventing and fighting crime.” Photo:
Police officers kept an eye on a Soviet navy training ship, the Druzhba, on Aug. 14, 1990. The unpublished photo was part of coverage for an Aug. 17 article that described the city’s police department “stretched thin by budget cuts and rising crime.” The commissioner was reported to be looking into whether or not officers were “overspecialized” and too “preoccupied with duties that distract them from their central mission of preventing and fighting crime.” Photo:

Police officers kept an eye on a Soviet navy training ship, the Druzhba, on Aug. 14, 1990. The unpublished photo was part of coverage for an Aug. 17 article that described the city’s police department “stretched thin by budget cuts and rising crime.” The commissioner was reported to be looking into whether or not officers were “overspecialized” and too “preoccupied with duties that distract them from their central mission of preventing and fighting crime.” Photo:

June 28, 1931: According to its handwritten caption by Frank Hurley of Hobart, Tasmania, the crew of the Discovery, a British-Australian-New Zealand vessel on its way to Antarctica, enjoyed a midnight sunset in the rigging. From aboard the ship, earlier in the expedition, Sir Douglas Mawson wrote proudly for The Times, “Very notable additions were made to geographical knowledge.” Photo: Wide World Photos
June 28, 1931: According to its handwritten caption by Frank Hurley of Hobart, Tasmania, the crew of the Discovery, a British-Australian-New Zealand vessel on its way to Antarctica, enjoyed a midnight sunset in the rigging. From aboard the ship, earlier in the expedition, Sir Douglas Mawson wrote proudly for The Times, “Very notable additions were made to geographical knowledge.” Photo: Wide World Photos

June 28, 1931: According to its handwritten caption by Frank Hurley of Hobart, Tasmania, the crew of the Discovery, a British-Australian-New Zealand vessel on its way to Antarctica, enjoyed a midnight sunset in the rigging. From aboard the ship, earlier in the expedition, Sir Douglas Mawson wrote proudly for The Times, “Very notable additions were made to geographical knowledge.” Photo: Wide World Photos