The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

March 10, 1933: Finally, a “fool-proof hover plane,” which, the back of the photo explained, would revolutionize “air transport, since it can take off vertically from the ground and descend in like manner.” Its inventors added that it could “hover or fly backwards at will.” Whose will, it didn’t say, raising the specter of a very frightening giant mechanical dragonfly indeed. Photo: The New York Times
March 10, 1933: Finally, a “fool-proof hover plane,” which, the back of the photo explained, would revolutionize “air transport, since it can take off vertically from the ground and descend in like manner.” Its inventors added that it could “hover or fly backwards at will.” Whose will, it didn’t say, raising the specter of a very frightening giant mechanical dragonfly indeed. Photo: The New York Times

March 10, 1933: Finally, a “fool-proof hover plane,” which, the back of the photo explained, would revolutionize “air transport, since it can take off vertically from the ground and descend in like manner.” Its inventors added that it could “hover or fly backwards at will.” Whose will, it didn’t say, raising the specter of a very frightening giant mechanical dragonfly indeed. Photo: The New York Times

April 2, 1933: According to some paste-on scholarship on the back of this photo, the French engineer Joseph Archer devoted 11 years to perfecting his propellered  “airline cab,” which was intended to scoot along at 150 miles per hour, suspended from an overhead monorail. Repeated fruitless Google and Times archive searches suggest that Mr. Archer’s invention was not a pedestal-smashing success, nor was his work on a trench mortar as legacy-making as it seemed at the time of this photo’s issue. A side view of the cab can be found here. Photo: The New York Times
April 2, 1933: According to some paste-on scholarship on the back of this photo, the French engineer Joseph Archer devoted 11 years to perfecting his propellered  “airline cab,” which was intended to scoot along at 150 miles per hour, suspended from an overhead monorail. Repeated fruitless Google and Times archive searches suggest that Mr. Archer’s invention was not a pedestal-smashing success, nor was his work on a trench mortar as legacy-making as it seemed at the time of this photo’s issue. A side view of the cab can be found here. Photo: The New York Times

April 2, 1933: According to some paste-on scholarship on the back of this photo, the French engineer Joseph Archer devoted 11 years to perfecting his propellered  “airline cab,” which was intended to scoot along at 150 miles per hour, suspended from an overhead monorail. Repeated fruitless Google and Times archive searches suggest that Mr. Archer’s invention was not a pedestal-smashing success, nor was his work on a trench mortar as legacy-making as it seemed at the time of this photo’s issue. A side view of the cab can be found here. Photo: The New York Times

April 24, 1948: The freighter Charles Tufts, which crashed on the shores of Sea Gate, Brooklyn, made an addition to the spectacles available to Coney Island sightseers. The Charles Tufts was a Liberty ship, one of the fleet of cargo vessels built during World War II, and the man it was named for donated the land in Medford, Mass., that would eventually become Tufts University. It took 12 hours and five tugboats to free the boat. Photo: The New York Times
April 24, 1948: The freighter Charles Tufts, which crashed on the shores of Sea Gate, Brooklyn, made an addition to the spectacles available to Coney Island sightseers. The Charles Tufts was a Liberty ship, one of the fleet of cargo vessels built during World War II, and the man it was named for donated the land in Medford, Mass., that would eventually become Tufts University. It took 12 hours and five tugboats to free the boat. Photo: The New York Times

April 24, 1948: The freighter Charles Tufts, which crashed on the shores of Sea Gate, Brooklyn, made an addition to the spectacles available to Coney Island sightseers. The Charles Tufts was a Liberty ship, one of the fleet of cargo vessels built during World War II, and the man it was named for donated the land in Medford, Mass., that would eventually become Tufts University. It took 12 hours and five tugboats to free the boat. Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 24, 1960: At the Art Model Studios in Mount Vernon, N.Y., where men would spend their days “‘just sittin’ around’ whittling — and get paid for it.” An article went on to describe a merry band of obsessive perfectionists who made model boats, mostly ocean liners, for ship companies and museums, spending hundreds of hours and using tools like tweezers to build “a precise fractional scale of the actual ship,” down to the “life preservers that would be tight on an ant.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times
Feb. 24, 1960: At the Art Model Studios in Mount Vernon, N.Y., where men would spend their days “‘just sittin’ around’ whittling — and get paid for it.” An article went on to describe a merry band of obsessive perfectionists who made model boats, mostly ocean liners, for ship companies and museums, spending hundreds of hours and using tools like tweezers to build “a precise fractional scale of the actual ship,” down to the “life preservers that would be tight on an ant.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

Feb. 24, 1960: At the Art Model Studios in Mount Vernon, N.Y., where men would spend their days “‘just sittin’ around’ whittling — and get paid for it.” An article went on to describe a merry band of obsessive perfectionists who made model boats, mostly ocean liners, for ship companies and museums, spending hundreds of hours and using tools like tweezers to build “a precise fractional scale of the actual ship,” down to the “life preservers that would be tight on an ant.” Photo: Robert Walker/The New York Times

Ski season in Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx opened on Dec. 11, 1964, the park’s slopes sprayed with fake snow and its benches’ fresh paint still drying. Arriving to the opening-day confusion at the ski area was Sacha Grill, shown here, a ski instructor who, apart from the fact that he carried skis, dressed more like a yacht club member than a skier. Perhaps that’s why the concession owner asked him, “Hi, who’re you with?” The Times reported that Mr. Grill “explained that he was one of the ski instructors.” The owner didn’t miss a beat. “Oh wow, we need them,” he replied. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Ski season in Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx opened on Dec. 11, 1964, the park’s slopes sprayed with fake snow and its benches’ fresh paint still drying. Arriving to the opening-day confusion at the ski area was Sacha Grill, shown here, a ski instructor who, apart from the fact that he carried skis, dressed more like a yacht club member than a skier. Perhaps that’s why the concession owner asked him, “Hi, who’re you with?” The Times reported that Mr. Grill “explained that he was one of the ski instructors.” The owner didn’t miss a beat. “Oh wow, we need them,” he replied. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Ski season in Van Cortlandt Park in the Bronx opened on Dec. 11, 1964, the park’s slopes sprayed with fake snow and its benches’ fresh paint still drying. Arriving to the opening-day confusion at the ski area was Sacha Grill, shown here, a ski instructor who, apart from the fact that he carried skis, dressed more like a yacht club member than a skier. Perhaps that’s why the concession owner asked him, “Hi, who’re you with?” The Times reported that Mr. Grill “explained that he was one of the ski instructors.” The owner didn’t miss a beat. “Oh wow, we need them,” he replied. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

April 4, 1957 was one for New York’s history books, as a record 2.4 inches of snow fell, coating Central Park’s boats and budding trees. Twenty-five years later, almost to the day on April 6, 1982, 9.6 inches fell on, or rather, crushed, the city, and since New York was hardly spared of snow this year (February was the second snowiest on record), one can only wait with a wintry mix of hope and dread for what April 2014 will bring. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
April 4, 1957 was one for New York’s history books, as a record 2.4 inches of snow fell, coating Central Park’s boats and budding trees. Twenty-five years later, almost to the day on April 6, 1982, 9.6 inches fell on, or rather, crushed, the city, and since New York was hardly spared of snow this year (February was the second snowiest on record), one can only wait with a wintry mix of hope and dread for what April 2014 will bring. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

April 4, 1957 was one for New York’s history books, as a record 2.4 inches of snow fell, coating Central Park’s boats and budding trees. Twenty-five years later, almost to the day on April 6, 1982, 9.6 inches fell on, or rather, crushed, the city, and since New York was hardly spared of snow this year (February was the second snowiest on record), one can only wait with a wintry mix of hope and dread for what April 2014 will bring. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Jan. 7, 1960: In Rockaway, Queens, snow blanketed the decrepitude at the Arverne Urban Renewal Area, which was slated to be entirely rebuilt by 1969. In 1966, it was still waiting on some sign of progress when a grand jury took a bus trip there to investigate the deteriorating section. Bungalows were razed in 1969, but nothing new was built, and in 1971 the city was parking low-income residents in trailers there while those residents, mostly blacks and Puerto Ricans, waited for more permanent housing. Not until the Bloomberg era did Arverne begin to show signs of new life. Photo: Patrick F. Burns/The New York Times
Jan. 7, 1960: In Rockaway, Queens, snow blanketed the decrepitude at the Arverne Urban Renewal Area, which was slated to be entirely rebuilt by 1969. In 1966, it was still waiting on some sign of progress when a grand jury took a bus trip there to investigate the deteriorating section. Bungalows were razed in 1969, but nothing new was built, and in 1971 the city was parking low-income residents in trailers there while those residents, mostly blacks and Puerto Ricans, waited for more permanent housing. Not until the Bloomberg era did Arverne begin to show signs of new life. Photo: Patrick F. Burns/The New York Times

Jan. 7, 1960: In Rockaway, Queens, snow blanketed the decrepitude at the Arverne Urban Renewal Area, which was slated to be entirely rebuilt by 1969. In 1966, it was still waiting on some sign of progress when a grand jury took a bus trip there to investigate the deteriorating section. Bungalows were razed in 1969, but nothing new was built, and in 1971 the city was parking low-income residents in trailers there while those residents, mostly blacks and Puerto Ricans, waited for more permanent housing. Not until the Bloomberg era did Arverne begin to show signs of new life. Photo: Patrick F. Burns/The New York Times

Feb. 11, 1972: Snowmobile fever had infected the United States, and a flurry of articles in The Times enumerated the vehicle’s pleasures and perils. While The Times Magazine called it an “American Dream Machine,” another article described the boon the “ski-scooter” was for Thief River Falls, Minn., where winter was “no longer sitting indoors drinking beer, watching TV or playing pinochle,” Andrew H. Malcolm reported. Bundle up, he warned: “If you aren’t dressed properly, the wind chill factor at 30 miles an hour equals 70 degrees below zero. One recent snowmobiler froze an eyeball into uselessness.” Photo: Gary Settle/The New York Times
Feb. 11, 1972: Snowmobile fever had infected the United States, and a flurry of articles in The Times enumerated the vehicle’s pleasures and perils. While The Times Magazine called it an “American Dream Machine,” another article described the boon the “ski-scooter” was for Thief River Falls, Minn., where winter was “no longer sitting indoors drinking beer, watching TV or playing pinochle,” Andrew H. Malcolm reported. Bundle up, he warned: “If you aren’t dressed properly, the wind chill factor at 30 miles an hour equals 70 degrees below zero. One recent snowmobiler froze an eyeball into uselessness.” Photo: Gary Settle/The New York Times

Feb. 11, 1972: Snowmobile fever had infected the United States, and a flurry of articles in The Times enumerated the vehicle’s pleasures and perils. While The Times Magazine called it an “American Dream Machine,” another article described the boon the “ski-scooter” was for Thief River Falls, Minn., where winter was “no longer sitting indoors drinking beer, watching TV or playing pinochle,” Andrew H. Malcolm reported. Bundle up, he warned: “If you aren’t dressed properly, the wind chill factor at 30 miles an hour equals 70 degrees below zero. One recent snowmobiler froze an eyeball into uselessness.” Photo: Gary Settle/The New York Times

Feb. 24, 1924: “Skims over the drifts like a bird”: A big sled outfitted with propellers and skis, devised by the aptly named Wing Brothers of St. Ignace, Mich., is the sort of thing that would have saved Atlanta and other parts of the South from their crippling January weather-induced traffic jams — the sort of thing that we may all start looking to acquire soon, as this winter seems as if it will never end. Other examples of propeller-driven sleds can be found here and here. Photo: The New York Times
Feb. 24, 1924: “Skims over the drifts like a bird”: A big sled outfitted with propellers and skis, devised by the aptly named Wing Brothers of St. Ignace, Mich., is the sort of thing that would have saved Atlanta and other parts of the South from their crippling January weather-induced traffic jams — the sort of thing that we may all start looking to acquire soon, as this winter seems as if it will never end. Other examples of propeller-driven sleds can be found here and here. Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 24, 1924: “Skims over the drifts like a bird”: A big sled outfitted with propellers and skis, devised by the aptly named Wing Brothers of St. Ignace, Mich., is the sort of thing that would have saved Atlanta and other parts of the South from their crippling January weather-induced traffic jams — the sort of thing that we may all start looking to acquire soon, as this winter seems as if it will never end. Other examples of propeller-driven sleds can be found here and here. Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 11, 1933: “Taking Advantage of a Winter Sport in New York,” children in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, sledded down the Long Meadow’s slopes right into a column in the day’s paper that reported a $43 million increase in the state budget, to cover costs like a liquor control board (thanks to the recent Prohibition repeal) or the rising population of prison inmates. Photo: The New York Times
Dec. 11, 1933: “Taking Advantage of a Winter Sport in New York,” children in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, sledded down the Long Meadow’s slopes right into a column in the day’s paper that reported a $43 million increase in the state budget, to cover costs like a liquor control board (thanks to the recent Prohibition repeal) or the rising population of prison inmates. Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 11, 1933: “Taking Advantage of a Winter Sport in New York,” children in Prospect Park, Brooklyn, sledded down the Long Meadow’s slopes right into a column in the day’s paper that reported a $43 million increase in the state budget, to cover costs like a liquor control board (thanks to the recent Prohibition repeal) or the rising population of prison inmates. Photo: The New York Times