The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

April 22, 1938: The original Seabiscuit, with his trainer Tom Smith, second from right, and his owner, Charles S. Howard, right, on his way to race War Admiral, a horse who, though a year younger than Seabiscuit, was both Seabiscuit’s uncle and chief rival. (Man o’ War was Seabiscuit’s grandfather and War Admiral’s father.) The match was eventually held in November, the only time they actually raced each other, and Seabiscuit, “the phlegmatic ugly duckling with the lame leg from the Pacific Coast” beat War Admiral with a record-breaking run. Photo: The New York Times
April 22, 1938: The original Seabiscuit, with his trainer Tom Smith, second from right, and his owner, Charles S. Howard, right, on his way to race War Admiral, a horse who, though a year younger than Seabiscuit, was both Seabiscuit’s uncle and chief rival. (Man o’ War was Seabiscuit’s grandfather and War Admiral’s father.) The match was eventually held in November, the only time they actually raced each other, and Seabiscuit, “the phlegmatic ugly duckling with the lame leg from the Pacific Coast” beat War Admiral with a record-breaking run. Photo: The New York Times

April 22, 1938: The original Seabiscuit, with his trainer Tom Smith, second from right, and his owner, Charles S. Howard, right, on his way to race War Admiral, a horse who, though a year younger than Seabiscuit, was both Seabiscuit’s uncle and chief rival. (Man o’ War was Seabiscuit’s grandfather and War Admiral’s father.) The match was eventually held in November, the only time they actually raced each other, and Seabiscuit, “the phlegmatic ugly duckling with the lame leg from the Pacific Coast” beat War Admiral with a record-breaking run. Photo: The New York Times

April 7, 1934: At the Aintree Racecourse near Liverpool, England, the Becher’s Brook fence is a formidable obstacle to any horse-jockey duo seeking glory at the Grand National (scenes from that competition are here, on Page 17). So formidable, in fact, that the fence terrifies the animals, who act erratically before the race, including the heavy-betting favorite of 2012, Synchronised, who died in that year’s Grand National. That death and later ones reignited debate and concern that the race’s dangers might “lead Parliament to ban it as it did, in time, with bearbaiting, dog-coursing and fox hunting.” Photo: The New York Times
April 7, 1934: At the Aintree Racecourse near Liverpool, England, the Becher’s Brook fence is a formidable obstacle to any horse-jockey duo seeking glory at the Grand National (scenes from that competition are here, on Page 17). So formidable, in fact, that the fence terrifies the animals, who act erratically before the race, including the heavy-betting favorite of 2012, Synchronised, who died in that year’s Grand National. That death and later ones reignited debate and concern that the race’s dangers might “lead Parliament to ban it as it did, in time, with bearbaiting, dog-coursing and fox hunting.” Photo: The New York Times

April 7, 1934: At the Aintree Racecourse near Liverpool, England, the Becher’s Brook fence is a formidable obstacle to any horse-jockey duo seeking glory at the Grand National (scenes from that competition are here, on Page 17). So formidable, in fact, that the fence terrifies the animals, who act erratically before the race, including the heavy-betting favorite of 2012, Synchronised, who died in that year’s Grand National. That death and later ones reignited debate and concern that the race’s dangers might “lead Parliament to ban it as it did, in time, with bearbaiting, dog-coursing and fox hunting.” Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 6, 1930: Wild horses, some “ready for the saddle,” 1,500 strong, were brought to Dublin Canyon, Calif., to be sold. A note on the picture’s back observes that “Will James could write several books on the different personalities of this group.” Mr. James was a popular author and illustrator of cowboy tales, including one about his own origins: that he was born “on a wagon in Montana or Wyoming,” orphaned, then raised by a French-Canadian trapper. (In fact, his given name was Joseph Ernest Nephtali Dufault and he was born in Saint-Nazaire-d’Acton, in Quebec.) Photo: The New York Times
Dec. 6, 1930: Wild horses, some “ready for the saddle,” 1,500 strong, were brought to Dublin Canyon, Calif., to be sold. A note on the picture’s back observes that “Will James could write several books on the different personalities of this group.” Mr. James was a popular author and illustrator of cowboy tales, including one about his own origins: that he was born “on a wagon in Montana or Wyoming,” orphaned, then raised by a French-Canadian trapper. (In fact, his given name was Joseph Ernest Nephtali Dufault and he was born in Saint-Nazaire-d’Acton, in Quebec.) Photo: The New York Times

Dec. 6, 1930: Wild horses, some “ready for the saddle,” 1,500 strong, were brought to Dublin Canyon, Calif., to be sold. A note on the picture’s back observes that “Will James could write several books on the different personalities of this group.” Mr. James was a popular author and illustrator of cowboy tales, including one about his own origins: that he was born “on a wagon in Montana or Wyoming,” orphaned, then raised by a French-Canadian trapper. (In fact, his given name was Joseph Ernest Nephtali Dufault and he was born in Saint-Nazaire-d’Acton, in Quebec.) Photo: The New York Times

Aug. 9, 1930: In Castellane, southern France, about a hundred miles from the Italian border, a herd of sheep sought ground suitable for grazing. Earlier that year, Premier Benito Mussolini of Italy made his own references to sheep in the area, The Times reported. “Down with France!” was the crowd’s chant during a speech in which the premier explained that he was rousing his people from stupefaction, “the bleatings of foreign wolves in sheep’s clothing.” Photo: The New York Times
Aug. 9, 1930: In Castellane, southern France, about a hundred miles from the Italian border, a herd of sheep sought ground suitable for grazing. Earlier that year, Premier Benito Mussolini of Italy made his own references to sheep in the area, The Times reported. “Down with France!” was the crowd’s chant during a speech in which the premier explained that he was rousing his people from stupefaction, “the bleatings of foreign wolves in sheep’s clothing.” Photo: The New York Times

Aug. 9, 1930: In Castellane, southern France, about a hundred miles from the Italian border, a herd of sheep sought ground suitable for grazing. Earlier that year, Premier Benito Mussolini of Italy made his own references to sheep in the area, The Times reported. “Down with France!” was the crowd’s chant during a speech in which the premier explained that he was rousing his people from stupefaction, “the bleatings of foreign wolves in sheep’s clothing.” Photo: The New York Times

In October 1933, 6,000 Boy Scouts descended on Long Island in what was the largest of an annual pilgrimage to the grave of Theodore Roosevelt. Held every year since the president’s death in 1919, the event was to commemorate his birthday. This time, the “veteran National Scout Commander” Daniel Carter Beard, at the age of 86, led the mile-and-a-half walk to the site in Oyster Bay. Photo: The New York Times
In October 1933, 6,000 Boy Scouts descended on Long Island in what was the largest of an annual pilgrimage to the grave of Theodore Roosevelt. Held every year since the president’s death in 1919, the event was to commemorate his birthday. This time, the “veteran National Scout Commander” Daniel Carter Beard, at the age of 86, led the mile-and-a-half walk to the site in Oyster Bay. Photo: The New York Times

In October 1933, 6,000 Boy Scouts descended on Long Island in what was the largest of an annual pilgrimage to the grave of Theodore Roosevelt. Held every year since the president’s death in 1919, the event was to commemorate his birthday. This time, the “veteran National Scout Commander” Daniel Carter Beard, at the age of 86, led the mile-and-a-half walk to the site in Oyster Bay. Photo: The New York Times

A stamp on the back of this picture from Japan reads April 25, 1945, on which date The Times had blaring headlines about the state of the war in Europe (it was winding down), and a smaller article at the bottom of the front page about an impasse at Okinawa, in the Pacific, that “American infantrymen” had brought to an end. “The fighting was heavy along the entire front as the doughboys moved cautiously from one fortification to another and there were as yet no indications of large gains,” The Times reported. Photo: The New York Times
A stamp on the back of this picture from Japan reads April 25, 1945, on which date The Times had blaring headlines about the state of the war in Europe (it was winding down), and a smaller article at the bottom of the front page about an impasse at Okinawa, in the Pacific, that “American infantrymen” had brought to an end. “The fighting was heavy along the entire front as the doughboys moved cautiously from one fortification to another and there were as yet no indications of large gains,” The Times reported. Photo: The New York Times

A stamp on the back of this picture from Japan reads April 25, 1945, on which date The Times had blaring headlines about the state of the war in Europe (it was winding down), and a smaller article at the bottom of the front page about an impasse at Okinawa, in the Pacific, that “American infantrymen” had brought to an end. “The fighting was heavy along the entire front as the doughboys moved cautiously from one fortification to another and there were as yet no indications of large gains,” The Times reported. Photo: The New York Times

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos
A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos

A proud mother greeting her son, returned home from fighting the Great War in Europe. “Like the little city of three hundred years ago,” the Times Magazine reported in 1953, when this picture was reprinted, “the present world capital represents an aspiration: it anticipates the future.” The spread, lavishly illustrated, traced New York’s history from a mercantile town of 800 to a bustling metropolis of 8 million at the time. “Today as the capital of the world not yet in being, it is a hostage to hopes, visions and dreams.” Photo: Times Wide World Photos

Aug. 12, 1959: “4 Chimp Children Take Up the City Ways,” the headline said, explaining how these chimpanzees at the Bronx Zoo leapt into the city water on hot New York days, even though they would never swim in the Congo. “On warmer mornings, they get wet without coaxing although they squeal and hesitate like human 4-year-olds,” The Times reported. As well as smooch their masters like human 4-year-olds. Photo: Arthur Brower/The New York Times
Aug. 12, 1959: “4 Chimp Children Take Up the City Ways,” the headline said, explaining how these chimpanzees at the Bronx Zoo leapt into the city water on hot New York days, even though they would never swim in the Congo. “On warmer mornings, they get wet without coaxing although they squeal and hesitate like human 4-year-olds,” The Times reported. As well as smooch their masters like human 4-year-olds. Photo: Arthur Brower/The New York Times

Aug. 12, 1959: “4 Chimp Children Take Up the City Ways,” the headline said, explaining how these chimpanzees at the Bronx Zoo leapt into the city water on hot New York days, even though they would never swim in the Congo. “On warmer mornings, they get wet without coaxing although they squeal and hesitate like human 4-year-olds,” The Times reported. As well as smooch their masters like human 4-year-olds. Photo: Arthur Brower/The New York Times

May 12, 1958: A contact sheet from a photo shoot at the Bronx Zoo for which an emperor penguin named Jill was the star, occasioning the addition of two duck-billed platypuses, which called “attention to the many other outstanding specimens” at the zoo. “The emperors are hand-fed — five pounds of mackerel a day,” her keeper, Chappie Solanto, told the Times magazine. “The public thinks they look like old men. And people are surprised at their fatness and that they don’t go into the water like other penguins here.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
May 12, 1958: A contact sheet from a photo shoot at the Bronx Zoo for which an emperor penguin named Jill was the star, occasioning the addition of two duck-billed platypuses, which called “attention to the many other outstanding specimens” at the zoo. “The emperors are hand-fed — five pounds of mackerel a day,” her keeper, Chappie Solanto, told the Times magazine. “The public thinks they look like old men. And people are surprised at their fatness and that they don’t go into the water like other penguins here.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

May 12, 1958: A contact sheet from a photo shoot at the Bronx Zoo for which an emperor penguin named Jill was the star, occasioning the addition of two duck-billed platypuses, which called “attention to the many other outstanding specimens” at the zoo. “The emperors are hand-fed — five pounds of mackerel a day,” her keeper, Chappie Solanto, told the Times magazine. “The public thinks they look like old men. And people are surprised at their fatness and that they don’t go into the water like other penguins here.” Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times