The New York TimesThe Lively Morgue

Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times
Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

Feb. 25, 1974: Dar Robinson, a stuntman, leapt from a seven-story building (or was it eight?) to show how life-saving an air-bag device on the ground could be. Mr. Robinson held more than 21 world stunt records, according to The Associated Press, before he died while filming a stunt in 1986. The film, released as “Million Dollar Mystery” in 1987, earned four Golden Raspberry nominations, including Worst Original Song and Worst Actor. Photo: Neal Boenzi/The New York Times

July 6, 1953: With the photographer Sam Falk visible on the front of the helicopter’s bubble shield, two police officers sat ready at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn to begin a patrol. “The helicopters of the Police Department Aviation Bureau, which heretofore flew daily at random all over the city, will start today to patrol the city’s waterfront, waterways and the five boroughs on a regular ‘beat’ basis,” The Times reported two weeks earlier. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times
July 6, 1953: With the photographer Sam Falk visible on the front of the helicopter’s bubble shield, two police officers sat ready at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn to begin a patrol. “The helicopters of the Police Department Aviation Bureau, which heretofore flew daily at random all over the city, will start today to patrol the city’s waterfront, waterways and the five boroughs on a regular ‘beat’ basis,” The Times reported two weeks earlier. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

July 6, 1953: With the photographer Sam Falk visible on the front of the helicopter’s bubble shield, two police officers sat ready at Floyd Bennett Field in Brooklyn to begin a patrol. “The helicopters of the Police Department Aviation Bureau, which heretofore flew daily at random all over the city, will start today to patrol the city’s waterfront, waterways and the five boroughs on a regular ‘beat’ basis,” The Times reported two weeks earlier. Photo: Sam Falk/The New York Times

Jan. 17, 1956: From the annals of improbable aircraft, the Army’s aerocycle, tested at Camp Kilmer, N.J., by Chris Kopp of de Lackner Helicopter. Like a wacky harbinger of Segway technology, the aerocycle was reported to have “two advantages over the conventional helicopter — it is more stable and it is easier to control because the operator steers it by leaning his body in the desired direction.” For the overdetermined navigator who feared leaning too far and falling on the rotating blades, there was a safety belt, and a rubber doughnut absorbed the shock if the pilot came down too hard. Photo: Patrick Burns/The New York Times
Jan. 17, 1956: From the annals of improbable aircraft, the Army’s aerocycle, tested at Camp Kilmer, N.J., by Chris Kopp of de Lackner Helicopter. Like a wacky harbinger of Segway technology, the aerocycle was reported to have “two advantages over the conventional helicopter — it is more stable and it is easier to control because the operator steers it by leaning his body in the desired direction.” For the overdetermined navigator who feared leaning too far and falling on the rotating blades, there was a safety belt, and a rubber doughnut absorbed the shock if the pilot came down too hard. Photo: Patrick Burns/The New York Times

Jan. 17, 1956: From the annals of improbable aircraft, the Army’s aerocycle, tested at Camp Kilmer, N.J., by Chris Kopp of de Lackner Helicopter. Like a wacky harbinger of Segway technology, the aerocycle was reported to have “two advantages over the conventional helicopter — it is more stable and it is easier to control because the operator steers it by leaning his body in the desired direction.” For the overdetermined navigator who feared leaning too far and falling on the rotating blades, there was a safety belt, and a rubber doughnut absorbed the shock if the pilot came down too hard. Photo: Patrick Burns/The New York Times

Feb. 12, 1965: Flights were canceled at Kennedy Airport because of heavy fog on Lincoln’s Birthday. While this DC-7B sat on the tarmac, a member of the ground crew searched for a Miami-bound airplane that was retreating on the runway. The ground crew member, the caption reported, could hear the other plane but not see it. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times
Feb. 12, 1965: Flights were canceled at Kennedy Airport because of heavy fog on Lincoln’s Birthday. While this DC-7B sat on the tarmac, a member of the ground crew searched for a Miami-bound airplane that was retreating on the runway. The ground crew member, the caption reported, could hear the other plane but not see it. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

Feb. 12, 1965: Flights were canceled at Kennedy Airport because of heavy fog on Lincoln’s Birthday. While this DC-7B sat on the tarmac, a member of the ground crew searched for a Miami-bound airplane that was retreating on the runway. The ground crew member, the caption reported, could hear the other plane but not see it. Photo: Allyn Baum/The New York Times

March 25, 1952: En route to the International Motor Sports show at the Grand Central Palace in Manhattan, Frazer L. W. Dougherty drove his Airphibian, an airplane that could be detached from its wings and tail to become an odd little car, down Grand Central Parkway. Mr. Dougherty was quoted in The Boston Globe as hoping to sell the Airphibian to the public soon. Meanwhile, in a preview of the auto show, The Times published a vision of the car of the future — “telescoping wheels for leapfrogging traffic,” a microphone for “yelling at drivers, pedestrians,” a “soda pop dispenser,” a bumper to protect the grill and a bumper to protect the grill bumper were among its features. Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times
March 25, 1952: En route to the International Motor Sports show at the Grand Central Palace in Manhattan, Frazer L. W. Dougherty drove his Airphibian, an airplane that could be detached from its wings and tail to become an odd little car, down Grand Central Parkway. Mr. Dougherty was quoted in The Boston Globe as hoping to sell the Airphibian to the public soon. Meanwhile, in a preview of the auto show, The Times published a vision of the car of the future — “telescoping wheels for leapfrogging traffic,” a microphone for “yelling at drivers, pedestrians,” a “soda pop dispenser,” a bumper to protect the grill and a bumper to protect the grill bumper were among its features. Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times

March 25, 1952: En route to the International Motor Sports show at the Grand Central Palace in Manhattan, Frazer L. W. Dougherty drove his Airphibian, an airplane that could be detached from its wings and tail to become an odd little car, down Grand Central Parkway. Mr. Dougherty was quoted in The Boston Globe as hoping to sell the Airphibian to the public soon. Meanwhile, in a preview of the auto show, The Times published a vision of the car of the future — “telescoping wheels for leapfrogging traffic,” a microphone for “yelling at drivers, pedestrians,” a “soda pop dispenser,” a bumper to protect the grill and a bumper to protect the grill bumper were among its features. Photo: Eddie Hausner/The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1928: Ray Keech of Atlantic City posed alongside his 36-cylinder triplex, with which he hoped to break the world’s land speed record. He succeeded on April 22, beating the record with a speed of 207.55 miles per hour at Daytona Beach, Fla. His record held till March 1929, when it was exceeded by Maj. H.O.D. Seagrave in his car, the Golden Arrow. Not long after, Mr. Keech was killed in a four-car accident during a race in Altoona, Pa., though he was posthumously declared the winner of the race and awarded $4,500. Photo: The New York Times
Feb. 18, 1928: Ray Keech of Atlantic City posed alongside his 36-cylinder triplex, with which he hoped to break the world’s land speed record. He succeeded on April 22, beating the record with a speed of 207.55 miles per hour at Daytona Beach, Fla. His record held till March 1929, when it was exceeded by Maj. H.O.D. Seagrave in his car, the Golden Arrow. Not long after, Mr. Keech was killed in a four-car accident during a race in Altoona, Pa., though he was posthumously declared the winner of the race and awarded $4,500. Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1928: Ray Keech of Atlantic City posed alongside his 36-cylinder triplex, with which he hoped to break the world’s land speed record. He succeeded on April 22, beating the record with a speed of 207.55 miles per hour at Daytona Beach, Fla. His record held till March 1929, when it was exceeded by Maj. H.O.D. Seagrave in his car, the Golden Arrow. Not long after, Mr. Keech was killed in a four-car accident during a race in Altoona, Pa., though he was posthumously declared the winner of the race and awarded $4,500. Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 14, 1931: “She rivals the best of the masculine speedboat racers,” the picture’s caption reads. Loretta Turnbull of Monrovia, Calif., won “fifty trophies, forty-five of which were won in competition with men.” A few years later, when she received kidnapping threats at her home, her father, Rupert, boasted of the family’s prowess with guns. “Mr. Turnbull said he was turning his ranch into an armed camp,” The Times reported. “Loretta and her three brothers,” Mr. Turnbull was quoted as saying, “were all taught the use of firearms and how to shoot straight and rapidly. We feel that we are able to take care of ourselves.” Photo: The New York Times
Feb. 14, 1931: “She rivals the best of the masculine speedboat racers,” the picture’s caption reads. Loretta Turnbull of Monrovia, Calif., won “fifty trophies, forty-five of which were won in competition with men.” A few years later, when she received kidnapping threats at her home, her father, Rupert, boasted of the family’s prowess with guns. “Mr. Turnbull said he was turning his ranch into an armed camp,” The Times reported. “Loretta and her three brothers,” Mr. Turnbull was quoted as saying, “were all taught the use of firearms and how to shoot straight and rapidly. We feel that we are able to take care of ourselves.” Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 14, 1931: “She rivals the best of the masculine speedboat racers,” the picture’s caption reads. Loretta Turnbull of Monrovia, Calif., won “fifty trophies, forty-five of which were won in competition with men.” A few years later, when she received kidnapping threats at her home, her father, Rupert, boasted of the family’s prowess with guns. “Mr. Turnbull said he was turning his ranch into an armed camp,” The Times reported. “Loretta and her three brothers,” Mr. Turnbull was quoted as saying, “were all taught the use of firearms and how to shoot straight and rapidly. We feel that we are able to take care of ourselves.” Photo: The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times
Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times

Feb. 18, 1976: Saturday night specials, on display, which did not appear in The Times’s pages until 1980, when the number of illegal handguns in the city was reported at two million. “Respectable people go to bars to buy guns,” said Detective Gloria O’Meara. “The local drug dealer has guns. They’re there for the price.” Photo: Bill Aller/The New York Times